LoveShack.org Community Forums

Reload this Page LoveShack.org Community Forums > Platonic > Business and Professional Relationships

Hiring someone who has been fired?


Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

Old 13th December 2009, 11:25 PM   #1
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Western PA
Posts: 7,357
Hiring someone who has been fired?

Do these companies exist? Seriously, like 12 interviews and nada? They like me until the middle I tell them I got let go. And I do into the whole speel about how I learned something from it. What the heck?

I actually took Tadxxx off my resume to apply to a few places, but have not heard back. (because it looks like I have no post masters experience now!) I don't know if that was a good move, but honestly nobody will hire me because of them. What am I supposed to do here? I'm ready to give up hope, seriously. Fiance told me he talked to a hiring manager at his company and he said that they would NEVER consider hiring anyone who disclosed they got terminated. AHHH!!!

Help?

Last edited by LoveShack.org Moderator; 14th December 2009 at 1:18 AM..
Lauriebell82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th December 2009, 11:31 PM   #2
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Third rock from the Sun
Posts: 11,889
Journal Entries: 2
Not all places do that.

I had one manager that hired me because I've learned to rise from my failures and adversities.

You have learned from this experience and now you just need to learn to rise above it. It is not easy and can easily set you back but you'll figure it out.

Another thing you can do is volunteer your time, yes it costs money but at least you can get another reference. I'm not talking Giant or retail. Volunteer at your local shelter or social organization. Another thing you can do is maybe start writing a column in your local paper or blog? something like a Dear Lauriebell82,
jerbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th December 2009, 11:41 PM   #3
Established Member
 
New Again's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,942
LaurieBell I don't know your history (with being terminated or anything), and I'm not sure how helpful this will be to you. But just a couple general suggestions about why this might be happening: First, you know that competition is crazy right now - so if a company has a choice between you and another candidate, and everything else about you two is the same, but she hasn't been fired, they're going to go with the one who wasn't terminated.

Also, could a similar situation (to the one that got you fired) occur in at the companies you're applying to? Because they will take that into consideration.

I'm sorry you're having such a hard time. I know it sucks and it's stressful. I like Jerbear's suggestion to volunteer. If it's possible for you to volunteer doing something connected to your desired career or education, that would be ideal, because you could network at the same time as you're showing your dedication to your field.
__________________
I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.
New Again is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:02 AM   #4
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,475
It's NOT because you were fired LB, it's your attitude about it! You're all blame, blame, blame, even in this post you say that you can't get a job "because of them." I honestly think it's because you still refuse to believe that you did anything wrong at your old job.

I would hire a person who has been fired, but I would not hire someone in your position. Because you do not acknowledge any wrong doing, the interviewer is worried that whatever you did that got you fired you will do again. In order to get a new job you have to demonstrate that you know and understand why you were fired. You also have to make the interviewer believe you will not do these things again.

Right now you're running from the past and lying, the worst thing you could possibly do. I'm a little worried about you LB
__________________
the problem with logic is there's too many loopholes
and the problem with truth is that it's usually brutal
allina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:15 AM   #5
Established Member
 
CarrieT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Napa - wine country
Posts: 11,711
LB, I used to be a Human Resources Director for an aerospace company and -- I hate to say this -- but I would RARELY hire someone who had been fired.

Unfortunately, there are too many people out of work who are vying for the same jobs and if the choice is between someone who was laid off and someone who was fired, I'll take the person who lost the job because of cut-backs over someone who did something wrong.

I have no knowledge as to why you were fired, but the best thing you can do is continue to be honest immediately in the interview, but be very brief about it and as positive as possible about what you learned from the situation. NO BAD MOUTHING WHATSOEVER; factual, brief, and then move on in discussing your qualifications.
CarrieT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:36 AM   #6
Established Member
 
JamesM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: In Between Two Large Bodies of Water
Posts: 8,485
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieT View Post

Unfortunately, there are too many people out of work who are vying for the same jobs and if the choice is between someone who was laid off and someone who was fired, I'll take the person who lost the job because of cut-backs over someone who did something wrong.

THIS is more of your problem than anything. Since there are so many applicants available, companies can be picky.

It is not so much about you as it is about how much competition that you have.
__________________
"A person often meets his destiny on the road he took to avoid it."
JamesM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 1:15 AM   #7
Established Member
 
WTRanger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,620
I would guess it would all come down to why you got terminated. You don't have to put that you were fired on your resume. Why are you telling people to begin with? Seems to me, I would just put the time I worked and see if they ask. If they don't, then why tell them? Legally, I don't think you have to put the fact you were fired on your resume.
__________________
"When you do things right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all."
WTRanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 11:56 AM   #8
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Western PA
Posts: 7,357
I made mistakes at my job, but really I don't think I deserved to get fired. Sorry, that's the way I feel. I don't care WHAT anyone thinks about that (on here anyway) and you can give me all the flack you want but I won't feel any differently.

Allina is right though that interviewers may be picking up on the fact that I don't know what I did wrong. I really don't! Yes, they gave me minor feedback but I do not know the real reason I was fired. They told me I didn't meet standards. That could mean anything. There was no warning I was to be fired, actually they had told me what a good job I was doing! So really I don't know how to explain what happened expect say something to that extent. Any other explanation and I really AM lying.

I don't automatically disclose that I was let go, I just tell them after they ask why I don't have a job/left. There is a gap in my resume now so that's the first question they always ask me when I sit down. Hopefully someone will call me without that job on my resume so I can start over again and be given a chance.

Here is how I usually explain what happened:

"Well, my company decided it was time for me to leave but did not give me an indepth explanation. I made some mistakes, as all new counselors do, and I did learn how important it is to accept feedback and try to stay calm in high stress situations.

Honestly that's the truth. I don't know how else to put it!

Last edited by Lauriebell82; 14th December 2009 at 11:59 AM..
Lauriebell82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:15 PM   #9
Established Member
 
CarrieT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Napa - wine country
Posts: 11,711
Okay, here is a suggestion; have a close friend (one who is very bright and thinks fast on their feet), all your old job and inquire about you. Have them pretend they are looking to hire you and find out what your old job is saying in why they let you go.

Honestly, telling them that you don't have indepth knowledge as to why you lost your job (and you are a counselor?) makes it appear that much more questionable that you are out of touch. It may not seem fair, but if you are a counselor, it is important to learn why you did not succeed at that job. Your response is really lame, honestly, and I wouldn't hire you based on such a statement. It needs to be re-phrased and by having a friend doing some reconnaissance on your part could do a world of good and will help you frame what answers you SHOULD be saying in an interview to make the stories jibe.

Come back to us with that info from your old job and we can help you with the dialogue.
CarrieT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:17 PM   #10
Established Member
 
JamesM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: In Between Two Large Bodies of Water
Posts: 8,485
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauriebell82 View Post
Allina is right though that interviewers may be picking up on the fact that I don't know what I did wrong. I really don't! Yes, they gave me minor feedback but I do not know the real reason I was fired. They told me I didn't meet standards. That could mean anything. There was no warning I was to be fired, actually they had told me what a good job I was doing! So really I don't know how to explain what happened expect say something to that extent. Any other explanation and I really AM lying.

Here is how I usually explain what happened:

"Well, my company decided it was time for me to leave but did not give me an indepth explanation. I made some mistakes, as all new counselors do, and I did learn how important it is to accept feedback and try to stay calm in high stress situations.

Honestly that's the truth. I don't know how else to put it!
First, don't leave this job off of your resume. When they find out that you did, then no explanation will work.

Second, while lying isn't the answer, an explanation IS necessary for why you left that job. Examine their standards and see how you may have fell short. And even if they did not tell you this was the problem, then decide how you may have fallen short and use this in the explanation.

So...if your clothes did not meet their standards, or perhaps you ticked off someone, then say something. Clothing wouldn't be a reason for termination usually.

Even if their was a personality clash that you did not know how to resolve, then say it. Even if you say it was a mutual agreement due to some unresolved issue, then maybe saying it will help.

And I believe that you don't know why. Companies have a way of avoiding conflicts to avoid lawsuits....and even counselors despite counseling others not to avoid conflicts.

My guess is...attitude is the reason. And I am not saying you have a bad attitude. It is how you were perceived by those over you. And this may have simply been because a personality there did not like how you acted to them.

Clearly, not knowing and saying so will not help you, because no interviewer will believe you. Despite this being closest to the truth, it won't be believed.

Ironically, this lack of explanation may be the best way that company shafted you.
JamesM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:19 PM   #11
Established Member
 
CarrieT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Napa - wine country
Posts: 11,711
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieT View Post
Okay, here is a suggestion; have a close friend (one who is very bright and thinks fast on their feet), all your old job and inquire about you. Have them pretend they are looking to hire you and find out what your old job is saying in why they let you go.

I meant to say CALL your old job but it was too late to edit the error.
CarrieT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:22 PM   #12
Established Member
 
JamesM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: In Between Two Large Bodies of Water
Posts: 8,485
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieT View Post
I meant to say CALL your old job but it was too late to edit the error.
Sorry. .....
JamesM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:34 PM   #13
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Western PA
Posts: 7,357
Carrie: Yes, I actually tried that. I had a friend call my old job and pretend he was an employer. He asked questions about my performance and my supervisor said that he couldn't disclose those details, only verify dates of employment. My friend then asked why I left and my supervisor just said "she didn't meet standards." And that sounds like I got fired obviously.

James: Actually when they put me back on probation in May (which they did just to fire me at the end of it) they told me I needed to color coordinate better and get my pants hemmed, which was one of the reasons they were putting me back on probation. So I did! And they STILL fired me. I could disclose the reasons they put me back on probation, as in my termination letter they said I didn't make enough improvement.

Reasons I was put on probatation (maybe you can help me formulate a response):

1. I told a client where I went to high school: they said I "disclosed too much to clients." So I didn't tell any client anything else about myself.

2. I was punching in 2 minutes late sometimes, they said my attendence was bad. So I started coming in 10 minutes early everyday from the day I got put back on probation.

3. I ran down the hall once because I was late for a group and they said I had anxiety issues. So I tried to remain calm and if I did get anxious/stressed out I went in my office to calm down.

4. The way my employers phrase feedback is mainly with insults. It is not constructive. So I used to get defensive. I tried to combat that by accepting feedback and instead saying "yeah, they might be true, how might I do that differently?"

I also asked repeatedly for feedback and even asked if my job was in jeopardy. They said no, I was light years away from getting fired and doing a great job. Then two days before my probation was up they fired me on my lunch hour AFTER I had seen all my clients for the day. But of course that sounds hard to believe an employer would do that I know what I'm saying doesn't sound right even though it is the truth.

So what other response would be good? I don't even know!
Lauriebell82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:41 PM   #14
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Western PA
Posts: 7,357
Oh by the way: how can a potential employer find out I worked there? In high school it was a mutual decision to get let go from a waitress job (I was bad at it!) so I left it off my application when applying for new jobs and nobody ever found out.

I think it's only if you lie about getting fired that they can catch you not if you leave a job off your resume. Not sure though...
Lauriebell82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th December 2009, 12:46 PM   #15
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Third rock from the Sun
Posts: 11,889
Journal Entries: 2
Honestly, high school jobs are not heavily weight toward your first job after you have obtained your degree.
jerbear is offline   Reply With Quote
 

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

 

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
questionable hiring parctice? laRubiaBonita Business and Professional Relationships 17 4th July 2007 6:21 PM
Hiring - without a care for me Hi Powered Business and Professional Relationships 1 6th January 2007 10:31 PM
Now Hiring!! Moose Parenting 5 15th February 2006 9:37 PM

 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 4:53 PM.

Please note: The suggestions and advice offered on this web site are opinions only and are not to be used in the place of professional psychological counseling or medical advice. If you or someone close to you is currently in crisis or in an emergency situation, contact your local law enforcement agency or emergency number.


Copyright © 1997-2013 LoveShack.org. All Rights Reserved.