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Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

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Old 1st August 2016, 11:12 AM   #16
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I haven't lived there but we have set up our international corporate office there and I am involved in the set up and hiring/set up of direct hires and ex pats. So may be able to help answer any questions.
Thanks!

What does the work culture look like from the outside?
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Old 1st August 2016, 1:34 PM   #17
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Thanks!

What does the work culture look like from the outside?
Compared to where? For our EU employees, comparable. For our US employees a bit more of a change. It is far more easy going and work life balance is far better. We are still adjusting to our European counterparts and their time off, remote work duties, etc. We have employees in US, Dubai, UK and now in Netherlands and the latter is the most robust on employee benefits.

Most of our employees have the need of vehicles (mostly for their positions) and car allowances are common. There is a lot of accessibility by bike. Housing is comparable to some of the other countries we are. Dubai has stood out the most for us on what is expected at management level.

Biggest issues we are dealing on an employee front is the 30% tax. There is a waiver for it that drops it to 20/22 (can't remember) but qualifications around it. This is is a bigger deal for those coming from Dubai, which has no income tax, to Netherlands.

English is primarily spoken (we will have store fronts there and haven't crossed the bridge yet on what is expected at that level for bilingual) and seems to be by most.

So far everyone who isn't originally from there has settled in nicely and are seemingly very happy. I have someone from my department that is looking to head up our side over there as an ex pat. We are looking into some medical concerns to see the coverage but she has already found they are more advanced than what we have in the US.
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Old 1st August 2016, 2:56 PM   #18
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The NL has a works council that is very employee-centric. I have worked occassionally on projects in Eindhoven and AMS. I would live there. (Not that helpful, but it's what I know)

If you go South like Rotterdam, find out the culture of your community, (ex. Luthern) because the neighbours will freak if you hang your washing out on a Sunday.
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Old 2nd August 2016, 1:07 PM   #19
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Compared to where? For our EU employees, comparable. For our US employees a bit more of a change. It is far more easy going and work life balance is far better. We are still adjusting to our European counterparts and their time off, remote work duties, etc. We have employees in US, Dubai, UK and now in Netherlands and the latter is the most robust on employee benefits.

Most of our employees have the need of vehicles (mostly for their positions) and car allowances are common. There is a lot of accessibility by bike. Housing is comparable to some of the other countries we are. Dubai has stood out the most for us on what is expected at management level.

Biggest issues we are dealing on an employee front is the 30% tax. There is a waiver for it that drops it to 20/22 (can't remember) but qualifications around it. This is is a bigger deal for those coming from Dubai, which has no income tax, to Netherlands.

English is primarily spoken (we will have store fronts there and haven't crossed the bridge yet on what is expected at that level for bilingual) and seems to be by most.

So far everyone who isn't originally from there has settled in nicely and are seemingly very happy. I have someone from my department that is looking to head up our side over there as an ex pat. We are looking into some medical concerns to see the coverage but she has already found they are more advanced than what we have in the US.
Great overview, thank you!
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The NL has a works council that is very employee-centric. I have worked occassionally on projects in Eindhoven and AMS. I would live there. (Not that helpful, but it's what I know)

If you go South like Rotterdam, find out the culture of your community, (ex. Luthern) because the neighbours will freak if you hang your washing out on a Sunday.
Very helpful, I'm curious about anything that's outside the Amsterdam bubble (it seems to be a bubble from the outside).
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Old 2nd August 2016, 1:16 PM   #20
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Great overview, thank you!

Very helpful, I'm curious about anything that's outside the Amsterdam bubble (it seems to be a bubble from the outside).
I have to say The NL is one of my favourite places.
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Old 2nd August 2016, 2:29 PM   #21
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Great overview, thank you!

Very helpful, I'm curious about anything that's outside the Amsterdam bubble (it seems to be a bubble from the outside).

Not so much Amsterdam on its own, more like the part of the country from Amsterdam all the way down to Rotterdam, known as de Randstad.
It's far more cosmopolitan than the rest of the country.

For example, outside the Randstad you'll find that a lot of (high street) shops are still closed on Sundays, and Monday mornings.


Outside of the Randstad the country can feel quite provincial at times, both in amenities and people's attitudes.
As a Dutch person going back there (I've lived in the UK for the past 15+ years) I find it quite frustrating at times.

I also find that the level of 'tolerance' or other races and creeds us Dutch people pride ourselves on has decreased a fair bit over the past decade or so.

Learning the language will help you tremendously, but it's not an easy one to master and in the Randstad at least, you can get by comfortably without it.


Work-wise it's a pretty cool place to be employed. Salary and added benefits are generally good. Holiday pay, also known as the 13th month, is great.
The place I worked at a few years ago (in Rotterdam) had a 'policy' of everybody having lunch together. You'd chip in a certain amount a week and we'd take turns popping to the supermarket to get fresh bread, sandwich fillings, fruit and drinks.
We'd put it all out on the table in the boardroom and ate together.
This practice is fairly common but it depends on the company I guess.


ETA: Healthcare is expensive. My monthly premium in 2011 was around 230 Euros per month. I was a healthy 34 year old back then.
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Last edited by SoulCat; 2nd August 2016 at 2:59 PM..
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Old 2nd August 2016, 5:11 PM   #22
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Not so much Amsterdam on its own, more like the part of the country from Amsterdam all the way down to Rotterdam, known as de Randstad.
It's far more cosmopolitan than the rest of the country.
I would draw the line also a bit more eastwards making up a square, say the cities you named and than from Eindhoven to Apeldoorn. Within those lines I would say that we are pretty modern

Never worked abroad so cannot compare with elsewhere. Minimum vacation days here are 21 days a year or roughly said four weeks, not eight weeks.
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Old 2nd August 2016, 5:17 PM   #23
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I would draw the line also a bit more eastwards making up a square, say the cities you named and than from Eindhoven to Apeldoorn. Within those lines I would say that we are pretty modern

Apeldoorn? Don't make me laugh.... I grew up near there and it's a very provincial town. Certainly not on a par with A'dam, Rotterdam and The Hague etc.

I'd go as far as to say that beyond Utrecht, you'll pretty much find yourself in hinterland.
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Old 2nd August 2016, 5:23 PM   #24
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Apeldoorn? Don't make me laugh.... I grew up near there and it's a very provincial town. Certainly not on a par with A'dam, Rotterdam and The Hague etc.

I'd go as far as to say that beyond Utrecht, you'll pretty much find yourself in hinterland.
Did I write anywhere that Apeldoorn is a metropole? Just drawing some lines here of the more crowded parts of the country.

Edited it a bit. My last remark was not necessary.
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Old 2nd August 2016, 5:34 PM   #25
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Just drawing some lines here of the more crowded parts of the country.
If you read my initial post carefully you would have noticed I made a distinction between the Randstad and the rest of the country. Specifically because Emilia was asking if Amsterdam existed in its own 'bubble'.

I'm sure there are larger populated areas where people deem themselves hugely modern, including in Apeldoorn.


This does not detract from the fact that those areas are not considered to be part of the Randstad, nor do they compare in terms of being cosmopolitan.


Don't be sorry, we'll just agree to disagree. Simples.
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Old 2nd August 2016, 5:47 PM   #26
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If you read my initial post carefully you would have noticed I made a distinction between the Randstad and the rest of the country. Specifically because Emilia was asking if Amsterdam existed in its own 'bubble'.

I'm sure there are larger populated areas where people deem themselves hugely modern, including in Apeldoorn.
Well to be fair, I live in a part that is considered part of the Randstad. It is just that for my personal taste some parts of the country get to little credit.
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Old 5th August 2016, 5:59 AM   #27
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Haha a bit of regional competition, I see.

Thank you for the posts, very insightful.
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Old 5th August 2016, 8:18 AM   #28
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well... everyone already wrote everything... LOL.
i love Amsterdam -- lived there for a couple of months and LOVED it. it's a beautiful city, folks are generally helpful + everyone speaks (British) English.

one thing that did bother me were shops closed at Sundays and 10am - 5/6pm work time... at least it was like that when i was there. like i would woke every single Sunday and would have a "oh, CRAP! nothing works and i didn't buy milk or bread. or toilet paper!!!" GAH. it was frustrating. but yeah, Albert Heijn works on Sundays so that's great if you have that store near you.
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Old 5th August 2016, 8:31 AM   #29
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well... everyone already wrote everything... LOL.
i love Amsterdam -- lived there for a couple of months and LOVED it. it's a beautiful city, folks are generally helpful + everyone speaks (British) English.

one thing that did bother me were shops closed at Sundays and 10am - 5/6pm work time... at least it was like that when i was there. like i would woke every single Sunday and would have a "oh, CRAP! nothing works and i didn't buy milk or bread. or toilet paper!!!" GAH. it was frustrating. but yeah, Albert Heijn works on Sundays so that's great if you have that store near you.
More and more supermarkets are open on sundays in more and more cities. It depends a bit on the elected city-counsels. Only where the majority is protestant it still causes problems, but than you mainly speak about small villages (at least in the part where I live).
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