LoveShack.org Community Forums

Reload this Page LoveShack.org Community Forums > Platonic > Business and Professional Relationships

Which Degree, and For Which Job?


Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

Like Tree20Likes
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 3rd November 2012, 9:01 AM   #91
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
I think regardless of my degree and subsequent career resulting from the degree, I need to get a math tutor.

A math and science tutor for one full year before college/Uni will open up more doors, and allow me to pick from more degrees.

....I am open to anything. I just think I need a math tutor for the year leading up to Uni, so then I can have more options to choose from in life!

And I am absolutely not going to do a job that I am miserable in: I will opt for a degree that I will enjoy somewhat.

I enjoy the sciences, I just cannot delve to deaply into math; no physics, but rather chemistry is okay, but my real passion is life sciences and biomedical science.

I want to find a balance: the highest paying career that I wills till enjoy enough to handle.
I would go for a lower paying field if I like it more than a higher paying job I would hate.

... ......... I just want to get the tutoring, as it will enable me more options; to find a career I like, that pays well enough.

Not doing math or science will only allow me to complete ONE degree; a social sciences one, that requires no science or math.

I just want options. I may even find I do not hate math as much as I thought.
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2012, 2:12 PM   #92
Established Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,562
So, you don't want to do math or write essays in college? Well, a lot of students feel this way, but you will have to do both. There are degree requirements that must be fulfilled, and math will be one of them, even if your future career doesn't directly relate to math.

Most campuses have a math lab where free tutoring is offered. Many students end up of living in the math lab for the semesters they have math. You aren't the only one who sucks at math; lots of students struggle with it.

Have you registered for classes yet?
iris219 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2012, 4:18 PM   #93
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by FitChick View Post
How about becoming a physical therapist? It's kind of related to fitness in that you help people become more mobile after accidents or illnesses.
This is a good suggestion.

In the US we even have Physical Therapist Assistants. A PTA is a 2 year Associates Degree at a tech school with a great payout in the end. Program requirements differ by school but mine required only one semester of a pretty remedial math course. I'm not sure if this is an option in Australia though.

Good luck with whatever you choose.
FitChick likes this.
Flicka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2012, 4:56 PM   #94
Established Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,434
Leigh 87,

I have a degree in Social Work and also operate a private personal training facility.

I also have always been quite poor at math and avoided it whenever possible. I was never taught how to do math properly and was just pushed "through the system" so to speak. I always did well in subjects like english and history.

I did need some math courses in obtaining the degree; the hardest of which was statistics. I hired a tutor and worked hard every week. You can do the same with whatever basic math requirements needed. I had no shame working with supplemental instruction. I'd spend three hours each tutoring session with my mentor. The first hour was to go over all of my notes I took in class. The second hour was completing my homework to be turned in. The third hour was going ahead in the textbook and working on future lessons so I would be less overwhelmed in class. This is what it took FOR ME. Everyone's learning ability is different and not all teachers can disseminate the material well. My tutor was great because he would break it down for me in a way that I could understand. I ended up getting an A in the course even though my math was substandard to say the least. If I could do it, I KNOW YOU COULD DO IT! For you it might be much easier - one never knows unless they try

I started personal training in commercial facilities because I always enjoyed fitness and helping people. I was in my early twenties at the time. Personal Training wasn't nearly as respected, accepted, or as popular at that time (mid 1990's) than it is today.

I took a break at the time to pursue a Social Work degree. I graduated and spent three years working the "Zombie Squad" for Child Protective Services (I live in Pennsylvania). I was responsible for all emergency onsites or "blow ups" for existing cases in the county at night when the day workers went home. Heavy case loads, poor pay, and tons of stress. I continued to Personal Train on the weekends.

My experience is primarily in the child welfare sector, but I will tell you that Social Work is very difficult work. People in the field partake because of the passion they have to help others. You know, the people in society that nobody else wants to work with type of thing. You will never make a lot of money in the field. However, I see no reason one cannot make a living in it if they budget properly and create a reasonable lifestyle around it.

I eventually decided to combine the technical skills of Personal Training with my passion to help people (Social Work). I operate my own facility and make good money. I see no reason you could not combine Social Work with bartending if you so desired. The bartending would certainly help you out financially than just earning from Social Work. The biggest caveat in my opinion would be burnout. You would have to make sure you could handle the hours for both jobs without becoming overwhelmed. You are young now, but you want to think about how you could juggle everything over the years as you age.

Personal Training is a great option for you too. It is one of the fastest developing professions and will only become more popular in the future. With technology only advancing people are becoming lazier, heavier, and sicker. A lot of people are relying too much on machines to do their work (including me). So, most personal training exists to keep people accountable for exercising their bodies. You get to help people with aches, pains, poor energy levels, nutrition, weakness, depression, etc...

Hope some of this helps you in the decision making process - good luck!

Josh
Under.The.Radar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2012, 6:19 PM   #95
Established Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 123
Also, remember that even if a degree has some maths in it (and most of them do) it may not be a totally gruelling program. My degree is in a half-science-half-humanities sort of field, which involves a little bit of advanced maths. Some of the courses I have done had just a bit of maths (a few simple formulae) but one was very heavy in statistics. But the lecturers were very good at walking us through it since they knew we weren't exactly fresh out of high school.

What's more, the lecturers also knew that once out of university and into the workforce, we'll have computer programs to do all the stats for us anyway. So rather than having us all try and memorise a hundred different methods, it was just a matter of making sure we know how the stats tests work and when they should be applied. As long as you know those things, you can make a computer do the rest and that's OK.

Basically, don't sweat the maths too much. The lecturers know you're not all mathemagicians, and they know it's been ages since high school maths. But they'll teach you what you need to know for the degree, and they'll teach it in a manner appropriate to the work you'll be doing later on.

Last edited by Queenie42; 3rd November 2012 at 6:22 PM.. Reason: Edited to add: By the way, in four years of full-time uni, there have only been four weeks of maths lectures.
Queenie42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2012, 8:51 AM   #96
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Under.The.Radar View Post
Leigh 87,

I have a degree in Social Work and also operate a private personal training facility.

I also have always been quite poor at math and avoided it whenever possible. I was never taught how to do math properly and was just pushed "through the system" so to speak. I always did well in subjects like english and history.

I did need some math courses in obtaining the degree; the hardest of which was statistics. I hired a tutor and worked hard every week. You can do the same with whatever basic math requirements needed. I had no shame working with supplemental instruction. I'd spend three hours each tutoring session with my mentor. The first hour was to go over all of my notes I took in class. The second hour was completing my homework to be turned in. The third hour was going ahead in the textbook and working on future lessons so I would be less overwhelmed in class. This is what it took FOR ME. Everyone's learning ability is different and not all teachers can disseminate the material well. My tutor was great because he would break it down for me in a way that I could understand. I ended up getting an A in the course even though my math was substandard to say the least. If I could do it, I KNOW YOU COULD DO IT! For you it might be much easier - one never knows unless they try

I started personal training in commercial facilities because I always enjoyed fitness and helping people. I was in my early twenties at the time. Personal Training wasn't nearly as respected, accepted, or as popular at that time (mid 1990's) than it is today.

I took a break at the time to pursue a Social Work degree. I graduated and spent three years working the "Zombie Squad" for Child Protective Services (I live in Pennsylvania). I was responsible for all emergency onsites or "blow ups" for existing cases in the county at night when the day workers went home. Heavy case loads, poor pay, and tons of stress. I continued to Personal Train on the weekends.

My experience is primarily in the child welfare sector, but I will tell you that Social Work is very difficult work. People in the field partake because of the passion they have to help others. You know, the people in society that nobody else wants to work with type of thing. You will never make a lot of money in the field. However, I see no reason one cannot make a living in it if they budget properly and create a reasonable lifestyle around it.

I eventually decided to combine the technical skills of Personal Training with my passion to help people (Social Work). I operate my own facility and make good money. I see no reason you could not combine Social Work with bartending if you so desired. The bartending would certainly help you out financially than just earning from Social Work. The biggest caveat in my opinion would be burnout. You would have to make sure you could handle the hours for both jobs without becoming overwhelmed. You are young now, but you want to think about how you could juggle everything over the years as you age.

Personal Training is a great option for you too. It is one of the fastest developing professions and will only become more popular in the future. With technology only advancing people are becoming lazier, heavier, and sicker. A lot of people are relying too much on machines to do their work (including me). So, most personal training exists to keep people accountable for exercising their bodies. You get to help people with aches, pains, poor energy levels, nutrition, weakness, depression, etc...

Hope some of this helps you in the decision making process - good luck!

Josh





OH.... my god. You sound like you have very similar interests as I do! I am SO glad I read about your experience.


I love helping people and I genuinely do have a passion for wanting to help out the worst of the worst; maybe, just maybe my positive and friendly attitude, that is not at ALL condescending to such types of people, will influence SOME one; to make them go back to school, or better themselves in some way.

............I would enjoy the degree, be able to do it full time, and work part time whilst studying full time, and still have most weekends free!

....And I would make a living out of social work AND bar tending/waitressing.

...SO I could do a degree that is not THAt challenging, easily GET the work from the degree, and on top of earning a living of social work, I could save for holidays through bartending!
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2012, 8:53 AM   #97
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
I know I could make a good living from social work ANd bar tending; a career I WANT, but without the poor anual bank balance.

Because I genuinely LOVE waitressing and bar tending, I see no reason why I would not make decent enough money working 9 - 5 as a social worker, and waitressing and/or bar tending 3 nights a week.

...I would also look into personal training some weekends for extra cash.

I do love the "menial" jobs lol, I am not sure if I want to pursue a science driven career just yet.

My parents both think I should just go to college next year as soon as possible, rather than get math and science tutoring a year in advance, in order to get into a "better" degree.
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2012, 8:57 AM   #98
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
And lastly - I also do very well with tutoring; I simply never applied myself at math at school, so it is not my apptitude but rather my EXPERIENCE with math that has resulted in me being clueless about how to navigate it.

I used a chemistry tutor and ot a high distinction; I did the homework and online quizzes with her present, and also did a little additional work if need be, just to be certain I knew the material well.

It is a very real possibility that with one year of tutoring, I would get into a degree with a fair bit of science in it, but I would still not want a degree with complex math.

...Exercise science would be an option if only I had a math tutor.

Unfortunately, I need a tutor a year in advance before the degree, or I would not be able to hack it.
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2012, 9:12 AM   #99
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
Quote:
Originally Posted by iris219 View Post
So, you don't want to do math or write essays in college? Well, a lot of students feel this way, but you will have to do both. There are degree requirements that must be fulfilled, and math will be one of them, even if your future career doesn't directly relate to math.

Most campuses have a math lab where free tutoring is offered. Many students end up of living in the math lab for the semesters they have math. You aren't the only one who sucks at math; lots of students struggle with it.

Have you registered for classes yet?


I do not mind doing essays at all; and I do not mind doing basic math.

Luckily, the degree I CAN do does not require math; it is a social sciences degree, and does not have ANY math.


Like I mentioned above, I have an option to pursue a career I actually feel passionately about, that does not involve math.


However, the drawback is, I would need to do waitressing about 2 - 3 nights a week in order to make a decet living.

I do love waitressing though so I would love going to work still!



.....OR, I could get a math and science tutor fro a year PRIOR to college, and then do a degree that will earn me more money.
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2012, 3:41 PM   #100
Established Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13,098
Start by working as a cocktail waitress at a high end hotel. You might meet a rich man to marry and that will be the end of your worries.
__________________
Nothing will change unless you do.
FitChick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2012, 6:46 PM   #101
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
Quote:
Originally Posted by FitChick View Post
Start by working as a cocktail waitress at a high end hotel. You might meet a rich man to marry and that will be the end of your worries.


No thanks. Besides, my partner, who I see a long term future with, is alread rich; he owns one house, and 50% of another....

He just has no cash in hand, seeing as he only owns assets!

Not that I am dating him for his houses....



And I am better than that, I am more suited to higher education; I am no genius, but I need that level of education in my life, in order to satisfy my own personal requirements.
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th November 2012, 1:59 AM   #102
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 39
I am NOT a social worker...yet. I am in my final year of my BSW program, though, set to graduate in the Spring. I was just thinking: if you decide to become a social worker and want to bartend part-time, you might want to look into this idea further, depending on where you live. If you are in a large urban area where you may never see clients, this might work, but if you are in a rural area and clients know that you tend bar, you may not be seen as a credible social worker, especially if you work with clients who have addictions issues. I live in a rural area, and my school of social work constantly emphasizes this point. It does not matter if you are in the bar working and not drinking, the fact alone that you work in a bar as a social worker may kill any credibility you might have. It may not, though: just something to think about.

As for salary, as I've mentioned, I'm not a social worker yet, but I think that depends on where you live as well. I live in rural Northern Canada, and some of the jobs pay ok. Some of the jobs I've seen posted start at $60,000 CAD per year, but they are usually in rural Aboriginal areas that are isolated. I worked this past summer at a child protective office, where the social workers each had about 100 children on their caseloads. They were paid even more, and in some cases, housing was free or supplemented, but work stress was high. As for salary, sometimes I wonder what I am doing as I know of people with trades who are making $100,000+ working in the mines. I will be making far less for a degree that took four times as long to earn than their trades certificates, but social work is something I am more interested in anyway, as I enjoy working with people.

I know all schools are not alike, so please don't think I am indicating that they are, and I can only speak for what I am experiencing in my own school. I read earlier that you are not into writing essays? In my class, which I know is not indicative of all social work programs, I write essay after essay after essay. I usually have at least one due a week, sometimes two (I had two due this past Friday, one due this Friday). Sometimes there are three due in a week. Lots of reading, group work, and presentations too. But no math!! I do not find my program "difficult" academically, but difficult in other ways. During my first internship, I was on the phone once trying to talk someone out of committing suicide. I've also literally chased a suicidal teenager around a school to talk with him. Sometimes, I wonder what the hell I am getting myself into, but then something happens and I realize that helping people is what makes me happy.
Nanuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th November 2012, 4:19 AM   #103
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
I do like essays.

I enjoy writing.

I was talking about the benifits of doing a more science based degree, and came up with the fact that I at least would get a break from writing so many essays!

It could easily have sounded like I had an aversion to essays, but that is not the case at all; I am adept at essay writing, but I am sure you can appreciate a week or two off writing essays! With the science based degrees with minimal math, such as exercise science, I would do less writing and more reading theory and working complex problems out.'

And the salary starts at about 50K here in AUS, but soon goes up if your serious about your job and can withstand the stress.

I was suicidle as a teen and had a horrible time, therefore helping troubled people has always been something that I have considered as a career.

And thanks for the tip on bar tending - I love waitressing too, so I better do that for extra cash.
Better still, I am fairly sure I will get into personal training again next year, and do that as a joint career.

My dream would be to be a social worker ANd a personal trainer after hours some nights a week.
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th November 2012, 4:56 PM   #104
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 39
Good luck! Yes, just keep in mind about the bartending...it doesn't guarantee that it would ruin your credibility, but it is just something to keep in mind. And yes, a break from essay-writing is awesome! Looking forward to the Christmas break!
Nanuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th November 2012, 7:15 PM   #105
Established Member
 
Leigh 87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 13,209
I like writing essays enough to write a couple a week, give or take more or sometimes (hopefully) less! So as to give my hands a rest from typing haha.

Hmm, another poster said HR is a good paying career, that is a major in social sciences.
Leigh 87 is offline   Reply With Quote
 

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

 

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Degree Necessary for A 'Good Job' Leigh 87 Business and Professional Relationships 51 1st November 2012 10:49 PM
cal state degree vs UC degree for comp. eng. ihateslowjams Business and Professional Relationships 0 28th July 2012 9:48 PM
What can I do with my degree? EmptyPromises Self-Improvement and Personal Well-Being 0 15th July 2010 12:55 PM
Going back for a second degree?? backto1 Business and Professional Relationships 39 26th July 2008 9:35 AM

 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 6:10 AM.

Please note: The suggestions and advice offered on this web site are opinions only and are not to be used in the place of professional psychological counseling or medical advice. If you or someone close to you is currently in crisis or in an emergency situation, contact your local law enforcement agency or emergency number.


Copyright © 1997-2013 LoveShack.org. All Rights Reserved.