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Which Degree, and For Which Job?


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Old 31st October 2012, 3:59 AM   #16
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Math is part of ANY degree in some form. For my undergrad I took a "transcendental functions" class and a statistics class. Granted my undergrad is engineering and for the most part I love math, but damn those classes sucked.

Not to mention math is a huge part of retail and hospitality whether you care to admit it or not.
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Old 31st October 2012, 5:33 AM   #17
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Social sciences is pretty much the only degree, besides law (which I prob wouldn't even get into with only 92%),


Social sciences is my ONLY no math option. There is absolutely NO math in it.


If I majored in welfare I would start out at about 50K and work up to 80K as a senior case worker.

My partner and I both think I could do a harder degree with a BIT of math, but do it part time when it gets really hard; I refuse to do a difficult degree full time, you see, and will only do it part time, and do the not hard bits full time.
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Old 31st October 2012, 5:35 AM   #18
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I am seirously thinking about full time work, with study being a part time thing that I work towards.


Part time will not only enable me to tackle a HARD degree, like nutrition or exercise science, but will allow for me to work full time too.
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Old 31st October 2012, 5:36 AM   #19
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oh no, not hard! But everything in life has been so easy
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Old 31st October 2012, 5:48 AM   #20
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You may want to rethink the social worker idea. I know that it's something that I wouldn't be able to do and I've heard that it's not really a lifelong career for a lot of people because of the burnout.

"There is a lot of literature out there that talks about the high incidence of suicide rates in social workers, high turnover rates in employment, high rates of burnout, and disruptive symptoms to personal lives resulting from traumatic stress (Figley, 2002; McCann & Pearlman, 1990; Meyers & Cornille, 2002; Pryce, Shackleford, & Pryce, 2007; Valent, 2002)."
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Old 31st October 2012, 6:11 AM   #21
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You may want to rethink the social worker idea. I know that it's something that I wouldn't be able to do and I've heard that it's not really a lifelong career for a lot of people because of the burnout.

"There is a lot of literature out there that talks about the high incidence of suicide rates in social workers, high turnover rates in employment, high rates of burnout, and disruptive symptoms to personal lives resulting from traumatic stress (Figley, 2002; McCann & Pearlman, 1990; Meyers & Cornille, 2002; Pryce, Shackleford, & Pryce, 2007; Valent, 2002)."
I would never encourage anyone I cared about to go into such work, helping to clean the gutters of society.. nope.
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Old 31st October 2012, 9:25 AM   #22
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oh no, not hard! But everything in life has been so easy


I am prepared to work hard! By all accounts, I look forward to the sense of acomplishment I will feel through doing so, I think it is necessary for me to get a degree mostly FOR that reason... although getting a good paying job is sadly a huge factor too.



The thing is, I would rather do a HARD degree part time. I would rather work full time and only study part time for the harder degrees. That is just me, and what would work best for me.

There is no need to throw yourself into a difficult degree full time, not unless you HAVE to. I will be perfectly happy working a low paid job whilst I only study part time for a year or so.

I will do at least one year full time though, just while I am getting familiar with a very hard degree and the materials I need to learn, I will nto throw myself in the deap end.
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Old 31st October 2012, 9:30 AM   #23
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wow, really guys? I thought majoring in in social welfare would be very rewarding?

I would so love to HELP kids, kids like I once was, get back into school and turn their life around.

I really wish I had an outside source tell me " look, get your arse into gear NOW so that you are not studying at 26!!!!.." or " take the time to pick your career if need be, but please, let me direct you to a place where you can further your skills and get a job in the meanwhile" and " if your not in college, please quitt sitting around doing nothing, I will tell you all the reasons WHY working and earning an income is way more fullfilling than what YOUR currently doing.."

I would like to give people access to the tools and support that may help them get their lives on track, and help lobby for more government help, since people at rock bottom can often not get into paid work once they mess their lives up to a extent (no skills, no money to get skills, etc etc)

I wanted to get into social work, to make a difference to peoples lives, in a positive way.


Unfortunately, it is not always well paid at all. But that said, you can progress up the career ladder, and SOME majors do pay well!
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Old 31st October 2012, 9:35 AM   #24
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I am thinking of going back and doing a nutrition degree, too.

I am going to seriously consider what degrees lead to a good paying job; if I am to study hard for 3 plus years, I WANT a high paying job in the end, somewhere down the line.

Some people say it is simply a privvilage to GET a degee to begin with, and a high paying job should NOT be a driving factor.

I disagree that money is not a factor for me and many people; I sure as hell won't study my butt off for a 40K a year job for the rest of my life!

If I am to study, why not do a degree that is hard but rewards you with a lotta cash at some point?

I will hate studying nutrition for the most part, but if the pay is good at the end, I will do it.



Hence why I would only stud part time, so as to BARE the disgusting element of studying math and science; I can ONLY handle it in SMALL doses.

When there is a will there is a way, if I want a high paying job, I WILL do the work, but small bursts would work better for me, than to study full time on a very difficult degree.

I am proud I even got into nutrition, exercise science, and dieteticts ( you need 93% which I GOT just)



Primary school teaching is another option; I doubt I would need to do math for more than one year for that, seeing as your teaching KIDS lol.

I think you get about 70K as a base rate for teaching.
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Old 31st October 2012, 9:53 AM   #25
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HELP PLEASE.


Here are my current options I am considering:

Primary school teaching, food science ( to become anything from a food researcher, to a nutritionist, among MANY things), exercise science, or........................... still considering social work/social sceinces.

Hmm. I want the best paying job, that also is a growing industry with plenty of jobs to be had...... I am thinking a food science degree would pay off, as there wer many options you could choose as a career, and since most people are total fat arses these days, the industry is growing and expanding.................

Yes that;s right, money is a driving force here. I am not a person to study for years at a time for sh8ts and giggles; I want a GOOD PAYING job.

Waitresses get about 30 - 40 K a year., for working full time. Why the hell would I get a "degree" just to be a social worker, who starts out on 30K? (albiet the pay DOES GO UP rapidly)

*sigh* I do not need a bloody degree just to prove I am "smart" enough. I know I could pass a hard degree if I applied myself.

Man, surely OTHERS here want a good paying job, and pick degrees with such promises and opportunities?
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Old 31st October 2012, 10:10 AM   #26
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What inspires you? What do you enjoy? Start there. This is a lifelong choice. While dollar amounts matter, that has to be balanced with trying to do something that is interesting and more than just tolerable if possible.

I get that you hate math, but say if teaching is really something you'd like in the long run, suck it up and deal with the math. It's temporary.
Exactly. It seems to me that you're approaching this backwards. I suggest determining the career you want first, then figuring out what you need to do to get there.
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Old 31st October 2012, 10:15 AM   #27
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Isn't it possible to make a living as a Personal Trainer - why not get a degree in nutrition or the human body, something you already enjoy.
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Old 31st October 2012, 10:22 AM   #28
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What inspires you? What do you enjoy? Start there. This is a lifelong choice. While dollar amounts matter, that has to be balanced with trying to do something that is interesting and more than just tolerable if possible.

I get that you hate math, but say if teaching is really something you'd like in the long run, suck it up and deal with the math. It's temporary.



I can suck it up and deal with math if it IS just temporary.

Hence why I think I may be able to do nutrition. Or teaching.

I have a couple of degrees in mind, but what it will come down to is the money; I am passionate about both areas.....

And with teaching, I have heard you may need your masters in order to get looked in for many jobs, due to high competition.

An advantage of nutrition is: the actual degree is "food science" and if you cannot get work as a nutritionist, you sure can get work as a food researcher or tester in a lab, among many OTHER related positions.




It comes down to passion and money.

I did love learning about the human body for nutrition.

The science as just hard, chemistry it was; but I think we only were going to learn it on a pretty basic level anyway.
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Old 31st October 2012, 10:25 AM   #29
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Isn't it possible to make a living as a Personal Trainer - why not get a degree in nutrition or the human body, something you already enjoy.


I am thinking of it.

I know what I am in for with nutrition; one subject was hard, 70% of people fail it, but I enjoyed it.


I am adept at reading and writing essays, in spite of my bad grammar on here! HOWEVER: I really liked the element of that one science subject I am talking about.

I LOVED not having to write essays! All you did was read a lot, and do multipply choice questions for exams and weekly quizzes!

So not writing essays is ONE advantage of science subjects. ALL it takes it committment and a lot of time spent reading materials.

You learnt every intricate detail of cells, and eventually would learn about the entire human body. A lot to learn, but I already studied it for a few months.
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Old 31st October 2012, 10:25 AM   #30
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You're willing to work hard except on something that is included in 90% of degree plans, math. It's not that you're bad at it, you can't be, you just haven't learn it, you're un-practiced. that's all, so everything is an excuse unless you actually are not normal.. meaning below average intelligence. You seem to forming decent sentences so it's more likely that you're scared/lazy.


you have your basics covered, go to school fulltime.. so you're not starting your career at 40.. that's smarter than working some dead-end job while struggling to study and maintain a life over a longer period of time that just finishing it up in one swift move.

but whatever.. doesn't effect me- I have a successful decent paying career.
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