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Do women go from one abusive relationship to another?


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Old 5th November 2009, 9:31 AM   #1
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Do women go from one abusive relationship to another?

I have seen this with my ex gf. She was in an abusive relationship for ten years where he would be constantly by her side or on her back followed by physical violence. She is now with someone who displaying many of these characteristics except he has not been violent yet (and might not turn out to be). He tries to tell her what to wear, who she can be friends with, when to go out etc. etc. He gives her the silent treatment too and she also deletes his number.

I couldn't be more opposite, how does this happen?
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Old 5th November 2009, 6:54 PM   #2
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Unfortunately, yes. It does tend to repeat itself, for a number of different reasons.

Over time -- and this is especially true if someone grew up in an abusive home -- being treated that way feels like love. Abusuers are not abusive every minute of the day. And when they say they're sorry for their behavior, it looks like love. Abuse becomes the norm; the price we have to pay for being with someone.

Also what happens at the beginning of a relationship nearly always feels like love. It's intoxicating to be with someone who can't seem to get enough of being with you; someone who comes on so strong and promises the moon. By the time the behavior starts to get scary, she's hooked.

Over time, someone in an abusive relationship can start to feel like she's to blame, that she's worthless, that no one else will ever love her again. It can shred her self-esteem. So when someone new shows interest, it's easier to ignore the red flags, because she is feeling so grateful that anyone would ever care for her again.

And once she's out of an abusive relationship, she's often convinced that she will never let that happen again. Until she meets the next guy who sweeps her off her feet, again.

When it starts to feel like something isn't right, she knows she needs to do something about it. But she's in love, and it's easier to stay and hope he changes than to walk away -- expecially if what's happening doesn't feel like abuse.

The problem is that abuse nearly always escalates, over time. What feels like love and adoration and commitment turns to control, and then emotional abuse, and then physical abuse. This true in the vast majority of cases.

But it always starts out so well, that it's often hard to recognize the signs -- such as the behavior you've mentioned. No one would fall in love with a man who slapped you around on the first date.

But the process starts slowly, the desire to believe that "this time" things will be different is very strong, and the longer someone is in that situation, the harder it is to leave, or to break the cycle.
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Old 5th November 2009, 7:04 PM   #3
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I agree that foundational environment factors heavily in the types of partners we're attracted to. If you're raised with pain = love, where either physical or emotional violence is prevalent, that's what you're going to look for. If you don't find someone who meets this criteria, people will create it.

Of what I've seen on LS, not only do abusees go from one abusive relationship to another, sometimes they become abusers themselves or less often, actually heal.
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Old 15th November 2009, 2:51 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by PinkToes View Post
And once she's out of an abusive relationship, she's often convinced that she will never let that happen again. Until she meets the next guy who sweeps her off her feet, again.
I would disagree to an extent. Most women don't realize the relationship was abusive, they might not know any different or think that's what they deserve. If it was so easy for them to know it was abuse they'd see the signs and stay away from an abuser instead of finding them familiar and gravitating towards them since they feel they are capable of handling the situation until they 'mess up' as in the last straw that breaks them, so they try harder to make it work and continue the cycle unless they are fortunate enough to get professional behavioral help all the while people might point fingers and judge them negatively without understanding their distorted thought process. They don't go into a relationship thinking "my last one was abusive, this new guy is also abusive." Instead it's more like "I wasn't good enough to handle the last relationship but I'm sure I'll treat him better this time so I won't do anything to cause him to get mad at me."
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Old 18th November 2009, 12:15 PM   #5
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A number of inceteful posts on thsi thread. It was an interesting read.

As a guy I cant say Ive given it a tremendous amount of thought but Id add the following.

It stands to reason that abusive men will be attracted to women who allow themselves to be abused. Conversely secure and emotionally mature men are going to avoid headcases.

In short they go from abusive man to abusive man because their options really are that limited
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Old 18th November 2009, 12:31 PM   #6
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Emotional Abuse

Sometimes, the abuser is a mastermind at the Facade. In the beginning things are wonderful, until the abuser is sure she/he will stay. Then all hell breaks loose and the abused feel they have no where to go.


It is a vicious cycle, one I am working on never repeating!
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Old 18th November 2009, 12:59 PM   #7
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Because this is such a serious subject, discussing it shows how irresponsible society is in how they view abuse.

It is not a gender phenomenon. We need to stop looking at abuse as a male perpetration on females. Till we do, abused men will never have the support they need to break away from their cycle in being attracted to and suffering with abuse at the hands of their female partners.

We are amazing in what we can adapt to and allow to become normal. Once abuse has occurred to the point of it being a way of life for the victim, they cannot feel at ease without it. It would make sense that an abused person who has not sought help and counseling, to feel most at ease with a person who has the same qualities as the abusive person(s) they have already experienced. Often, a person who has been victimized in this way, will manufacture situations to make their new partner loose their temper. It is not their fault that the person has so little control over their anger, but the victim can learn to play this part of the cycle to ensure it continues with a new person.
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Old 23rd November 2009, 2:32 PM   #8
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abuse

whos to blame. all the info sounds too familiar. my relationship started out perfect. then the anger and rage from her and constant manipulation and intentional barage to push me over the edge. she started the physical and emotional abuse and left me stranded at a concert. took a taxi home and we got into an argument where she became physical and i was trying to defend myself but she got bruises. from there it had escelated to where she would constantly provoke me and finally pushed me over the edge with her constant attacks and demeaning ways. it has now been a yr and i have not done a thing but she still provokes me and pushes my buttons calling me an abuser. come to find out she has been charged twice w DV and has had other charges w previous relationships. has had a horrible childhood w violence in upbringing. instead of me being the typical male abuser why is she not the one being acused of the abuser. all of abusive ways and manipulation to purposely push my buttons to get me to hit her or push her. i have restrained myself. but now i have a dui from leaving an altercation and has led to nothing but trouble. if i tell her i want a divorce she threatens to run to police to have me charged. where to go what to do. i am at a loss.
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Old 5th December 2009, 7:22 PM   #9
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Pinktoes said it to a T i think women often find the abuse is because of something that happened to them in the past but this also goes for men, if they were not appreciated or loved enough they tend to act out when they grow to men.
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Old 7th December 2009, 4:09 PM   #10
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Women who are like this are in the minority. Having said that for the most part women are not looking for a doormat. They want a man with confidence and balls. So they are taking their chances when they pass on a doormat.

Most men and women tend to give their partners second chances, so they are setting themselves to be repeatedly abused. But once free of an abuser, I have noticed most do not repeat the same mistake twice.

But alas there are a few who repeatedly go after abusive men. I did have a fwb after the breakup of my marriage that was this way. There was just something in her that wasn't right. We were co-workers, she was down right gorgeous, she was one of those who came to work without a hair out of place, but about every 6 months or so whe would show up at work looking like a raccoon with a black eye or two.

After the breakup she took an interest in me and let me know she might be available. The led to a couple of pr*ck teasing encounters. Being a former player, I repeatedly passed on the 3rd attempt, until she offered to come over and teach me how to cook this gourmet meal that I had failed to cook properly a couple of times. After the meal she began her act, and this time I told her I was not playing and asked her to leave. Five minutes after she left she was back knocking on my door and telling me I could have her. I told her that if she wanted to come back in she would have to take off all of her clothes and leave them on the door step. After she stripped naked outside, I let her in. Abusive yes, but not like smashing her with my knuckles.

She responded and we became fwb for many years. I got to know her parents, sister and two brothers, and their kids. They were all normal people and hoped that we might someday become a couple.

She just had this bad gene, or something, we talked about it many times, as deep in her heart she wanted to find Mr. Right and have a family. She was very attractive, so had lots of suitors, but nice guys, the Mr. Rights turned her off. She didn't know why herself. She had even tried counseling, but was still at a lose. She was not an alcoholic, she did not do drugs, she just was just attracted to abusive men. On average she went through a new guy in less than 9 months. They would beat her, she would leave them, and within a month or two begin again with a new guy
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Old 9th December 2009, 3:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leveller View Post
I have seen this with my ex gf. She was in an abusive relationship for ten years where he would be constantly by her side or on her back followed by physical violence. She is now with someone who displaying many of these characteristics except he has not been violent yet (and might not turn out to be). He tries to tell her what to wear, who she can be friends with, when to go out etc. etc. He gives her the silent treatment too and she also deletes his number.

I couldn't be more opposite, how does this happen?
Hope this helps..

http://www.womensaid.org.uk/domestic...01&itemid=1279

Take care,
Eve xx
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Old 9th December 2009, 3:12 PM   #12
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I think it depends on a person's background. If they were raised in an abusive environment, then they're more likely to keep getting into abusive relationships because it's the only frame-of-reference of 'normal' that they have. I was in an abusive relationship but I wasn't raised in an abusive environment so once I got out of it, I never got into another one.
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Old 10th December 2009, 8:49 AM   #13
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Women are masochists who are attracted to 'power', even at the risk that said power might be turned against them.
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Old 10th December 2009, 12:31 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by threebyfate View Post
I agree that foundational environment factors heavily in the types of partners we're attracted to. If you're raised with pain = love, where either physical or emotional violence is prevalent, that's what you're going to look for. If you don't find someone who meets this criteria, people will create it.

Of what I've seen on LS, not only do abusees go from one abusive relationship to another, sometimes they become abusers themselves or less often, actually heal.
I'm going to bump my post for Woggle's sake, since he once was an abusee and now, has chosen to take on the role of abuser.
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