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Women, do you wear makeup?


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Old 3rd January 2018, 7:12 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by basil67 View Post
Staying out of the sun is the best way to avoid looking old by 40. I know older people who've got lovely skin but used minimal skin care. They simply wore hats and sunscreen.
Exactly! This is why my face still looks pretty decent at 39. I have been working the night shift for 15 years and hardly see the sunlight It's the Dracula skincare regime.
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Old 3rd January 2018, 9:54 AM   #32
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I personally think this "avoiding sun" thing is overrated, but it probably depends on one's ethnic background as well. The other day, I saw a clip of a celebrity on youtube. She's in her late 40s and is widely regarded very hot (she was picked as the most beautiful woman by People Magazine some years ago). Gosh, her face looked so fake. I have a 70-year-old female relative who was regarded as a natural beauty when she was young. Throughout her life, she uses minimal skincare products and wears minimal or no makeup. But she looks so much better than that hot celebrity. Go figure...
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Old 3rd January 2018, 10:57 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by JuneL View Post
I personally think this "avoiding sun" thing is overrated, but it probably depends on one's ethnic background as well. The other day, I saw a clip of a celebrity on youtube. She's in her late 40s and is widely regarded very hot (she was picked as the most beautiful woman by People Magazine some years ago). Gosh, her face looked so fake. I have a 70-year-old female relative who was regarded as a natural beauty when she was young. Throughout her life, she uses minimal skincare products and wears minimal or no makeup. But she looks so much better than that hot celebrity. Go figure...
A lot has to do with genetics and lifestyle choices, such as smoking.
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Old 3rd January 2018, 11:36 AM   #34
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The naked truth that people just hate hearing is that you can't do much against your genetics. Not for looks or anything else. No amount of skincare, dieting, makeup or plastic surgery will help your looks significantly, it is 90% genetics, 5% lifestyle and 5% confidence or lack of it thereof.

Ethnic background matters BIG time, obviously how your skin reacts to the sun is directly linked to the amount of melanin in the skin - something that is largely genetic. That doesn't mean photo damage is to be underestimated of course. But for most of people with office jobs - you have minimal sun exposure during the week anyway.

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Originally Posted by JuneL View Post
I personally think this "avoiding sun" thing is overrated, but it probably depends on one's ethnic background as well. The other day, I saw a clip of a celebrity on youtube. She's in her late 40s and is widely regarded very hot (she was picked as the most beautiful woman by People Magazine some years ago). Gosh, her face looked so fake. I have a 70-year-old female relative who was regarded as a natural beauty when she was young. Throughout her life, she uses minimal skincare products and wears minimal or no makeup. But she looks so much better than that hot celebrity. Go figure...
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Old 3rd January 2018, 12:05 PM   #35
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I wear makeup a few times a year (usually for fancy dinners where we dress up, and social events like attending weddings), and even then it's just concealer/BB cream and lip stain.

I've never noticed a problem with it in either my relationship life or my work life. The SO met me without makeup, and I didn't wear any at all for the first few years that we were together (we were students, so we didn't go out to fancy dinners, and none of our friends were getting married so no weddings). Seems to work well for him.

Re: work, I agree with you that there is a bit of a double standard for male vs female appearance in some fields. I can't believe it's still legal for companies to require women to wear high heels, for one thing! However, this isn't really the case in my field. In fact, I actually found that the more androgynous I dressed/behaved, the more the guys in my field tended to respect me, which suits me just fine (I prefer to save my feminine wiles for the bedroom or for men whom I'm in an intimate relationship with ).
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Old 3rd January 2018, 1:32 PM   #36
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Check out astaxanthin. It's a supplement you take internally for general health purposes but it also protects your skin from sun damage in ordinary circumstances.

If you buy it make sure you get the natural, not synthetic.

I used to wear sunscreen but since taking astaxanthin don't have to mess with it anymore. Plus, since not wearing sunscreen you get the benefits (vitamin D3) the sun offers.
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Old 3rd January 2018, 1:38 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by LivingWaterPlease View Post
Check out astaxanthin. It's a supplement you take internally for general health purposes but it also protects your skin from sun damage in ordinary circumstances.

If you buy it make sure you get the natural, not synthetic.

I used to wear sunscreen but since taking astaxanthin don't have to mess with it anymore. Plus, since not wearing sunscreen you get the benefits (vitamin D3) the sun offers.
Please don't do this. Take astaxanthin if you find it helps you, but you still NEED to apply broad spectrum UVA/UVB sunblock regardless if you're going to be out for a long time in high UV exposure, or else you're putting yourself at high risk of skin cancer.

https://www.skincancer.org/healthy-l...tamin-d/damage

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In contrast, there is overwhelming evidence for the multiple benefits of sun protection.7-16 Controlled studies have shown that regular use of an SPF 15 or higher broad-spectrum sunscreen reduces your chances of developing squamous cell carcinoma by about 40 percent,12 melanoma by 50 percent14 and premature skin aging by 24 percent.15
It has been proven on the molecular level that the sunís ultraviolet (UV) light damages the skinís cellular DNA, creating genetic mutations that can lead to skin cancer.2,16 Both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization have identified solar UV as a proven human carcinogen, with studies linking it to about 90 percent of nonmelanoma skin cancers9 and about 86 percent of melanomas,10 as well as premature skin aging.11 In addition, UV radiation harms the eyes and can cause cataracts, eyelid cancers and other ocular skin cancers, including melanomas.17
In short, unprotected sun exposure puts you at risk for any number of conditions that can permanently damage your skin, disfigure you, sometimes even kill you. And the regular use of sun protection can go a long way to keep any of that from happening.

Does Sunscreen Use Lead to Vitamin D Deficiency?
ó
High-SPF sunscreens are designed to filter out most of the sunís UVB radiation, since UVB damage is the major cause of sunburn and can lead to skin cancers. UVB wavelengths happen to be the specific wavelengths that trigger vitamin D production in the skin. Nonetheless, clinical studies have never found that everyday sunscreen use leads to vitamin D insufficiency.2,18,19 In fact, the prevailing studies show that people who use sunscreen daily can maintain their vitamin D levels18,19
One of the explanations for this may be that no matter how much sunscreen you use or how high the SPF, some of the sunís UV rays reach your skin. An SPF 15 sunscreen filters out 93 percent of UVB rays, SPF 30 keeps out 97 percent, and SPF 50 filters out 98 percent. This leaves anywhere from 2 to 7 percent of solar UVB reaching your skin, even with high-SPF sunscreens. And thatís if you use them perfectly.
Damage Before You Know It
ó
The truth is, it doesnít take much sun exposure for the body to produce vitamin D. Even committed proponents of unprotected sun exposure recommend no more than 10 to 15 minutes of exposure to arms, legs, abdomen and back, two to three times a week, followed by good sun protection.20 That minor amount of exposure produces all the vitamin D your body can muster. After that, your body automatically starts to dispose of vitamin D to avoid an overload of the vitamin, at which point your sun exposure is giving you nothing but sun damage without any of the presumed benefit.2,20
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Old 3rd January 2018, 2:15 PM   #38
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I wear it, although not all the time. And I enjoy when I do.

I'm not one to overdo my makeup during the day tho; good foundation, a bit of blush, mascara and sheer lip gloss. That's about it for most days.

If I'm going out at night, I'll glam it up several notches and love seeing how I transform as a result. Particularly my eyes.

When I'm not having to go into work or have anything special going on, I won't bother with any makeup at all and am perfectly comfortable going out in public and going about my business in the raw.

That said, I will agree that good skincare makes all the difference. I'm obsessed with taking care of my skin. It not only helps whatever makeup you put on look better but it also helps you age gracefully.

I have found that women with bad skin wouldn't be caught dead without makeup and are the ones who tend to spackle it on thinking it will cover up their imperfections when it actually does the completely opposite :/
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Old 3rd January 2018, 2:28 PM   #39
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Make up is actually good for the skin, as much as any other skin product. Most foundations have SPF filters and generally provide a shield against environmental factors.

Having said that: skincare products largely work on the basis of placebo effect. There are 2-3 ingredients that make a difference (retinol, SPF, some acids) and that's about it. The rest is pure placebo but it is a pleasant sensation that we're beating age and/or genetics (in reality biology always wins but it is truly pleasant to mislead ourselves )
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Old 3rd January 2018, 2:34 PM   #40
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Also - 95% of make up products can be substituted for another one. Labeling with a fancy name drives me bananas. Highlighter = shimmer eye shadow, concealer = thick foundation etc, lip stain = blotted lipstick etc. The different names exist to bamboozle young girls and older rookies.

Ugh and my pet peeve are so called "natural make up brands" - this is literally a theft: selling diluted pigments (e.g. skin 'tint' is just foundation sheered out with cheap solvent) on higher price...yuk.
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Old 3rd January 2018, 6:51 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Elswyth View Post
Please don't do this. Take astaxanthin if you find it helps you, but you still NEED to apply broad spectrum UVA/UVB sunblock regardless if you're going to be out for a long time in high UV exposure, or else you're putting yourself at high risk of skin cancer.

https://www.skincancer.org/healthy-l...tamin-d/damage
I disagree, Elswyth! This is what I use instead of sunscreen and four other females (my two sisters, my mother, and my late grandmother), two of whom use sunscreen and are younger than I, in my family have had surgery on their faces for skin cancer. Basically, I'm the only one in my family who hasn't!

I have not had skin cancer, do not use sunscreen, and though my sisters do, and I am a decade older than one of them and older by years than the other, I am consistently thought to be the youngest of the three because of the condition of my skin. I look at least twenty years (I often hear thirty or more, twenty is conservative) younger than I am and have had no plastic surgery, procedures or fillers.

I am outside for at least an hour six days a week unprotected by anything other than astaxanthin, one of the purposes being to absorb the sun's rays on my face while I walk.

I am close to seventy years old, my skin is flawless (I wear no foundation or creams ever on my face with no need to do so), and don't have a wrinkle on my face, age spots or any crows feet. I use no commercial skin care products except for hand cream or lotion on my hands only sometimes. I have been using retin-A on my skin for a year but am thinking of quitting because it's not doing anything for me at this point and it's drying my skin out.

Everyone do your own research and decide for yourself, though. You can make a case for the importance of using sunscreen or not depending on which links you post. There's plenty out there!

And, yes, I know dermatologists recommend sunscreen. I did not post about astaxanthin to encourage anyone to go outside unprotected from the sun, but only to tout the wonders of astaxanthin! I did my own research, made a decision, and have benefitted majorly from doing so. I also use one other major skin enhancing natural supplement but it doesn't protect from the sun.

Am editing this to add that though I don't use any creams on my face (except as mentioned earlier have been using retin-A for the last year but may quit soon) I do use topical astaxanthin straight from the capsule on my face two or three times a week for about an hour because, although taking it internally is beneficial, there seems to be evidence that applying it on top of the skin of your face, in addition to taking it orally, gives even more benefit to your skin as only a percentage of astaxanthin gets to your face when taking it orally. The percentage from taking astaxanthin internally is enough to protect your skin from harmful rays under ordinary circumstances. Topical astaxanthin from the capsule is messy and stains your skin and any clothing it gets on so you need to wash your face very well after removing it. I really like the slight stain, though, because it makes it appear as if my face is slightly tanned.
How Sunscreen Could Be Causing Skin Cancer, Not The Sun ? Collective Evolution

Last edited by LivingWaterPlease; 3rd January 2018 at 7:48 PM..
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Old 3rd January 2018, 7:52 PM   #42
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Today my daughter and I were heading out and apparently my talking messed up her make up routine as she was getting ready.

She complained that I set her back 20 minutes because she had to start over. 20 MINUTES? for MAKE UP???

No wonder why that kid always runs late
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Old 3rd January 2018, 8:42 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by JuneL View Post
I personally think this "avoiding sun" thing is overrated, but it probably depends on one's ethnic background as well.
If we are talking about fair skin, sun absolutely causes damage. I have certainly seen its affects first hand. Growing up in a beach town, where women loved to tan, we started coining the phase "leather skin ladies". Saw the same thing among my fellow equestrians (we spend a lot of time outside). Wrinkled, spotted, dry skin.

And science backs it, here is a slide show from the Mayo Clinic on the damage sun does to skin.

Specifically how sun damage causes wrinkles:
https://www.mayoclinic.org

Quote:
Solar elastosis
Ultraviolet radiation breaks down the skin's connective tissue ó collagen and elastin fibers ó that lies in the deeper layer of skin (dermis). Without the supportive connective tissue, the skin loses its strength and flexibility. This condition, known as solar elastosis (e-las-TOE-sis), is characterized by vertical creases, deep wrinkles, and loose or sagging skin.

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Originally Posted by No_Go View Post
The naked truth that people just hate hearing is that you can't do much against your genetics. Not for looks or anything else. No amount of skincare, dieting, makeup or plastic surgery will help your looks significantly, it is 90% genetics, 5% lifestyle and 5% confidence or lack of it thereof.
I do and don't agree... Yes genetics is huge, and no amount of expensive eye creams are going to get rid of dark under eye circles for example.

But diet does make a difference between healthy, and oily, or dry, angry skin.

And makeup?! There are some real wizards out there. The examples are many, but this girl for instance, you can't tell me make up made her look only 5% better.

Make up


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Originally Posted by No_Go View Post
Ethnic background matters BIG time, obviously how your skin reacts to the sun is directly linked to the amount of melanin in the skin - something that is largely genetic. That doesn't mean photo damage is to be underestimated of course. But for most of people with office jobs - you have minimal sun exposure during the week anyway.
Out here in California, a lot of people spend time outdoors and in the sun. Heck, I can see the effects on most of my friends from high school. We are all outdoorsy types, except for when they were tanning, I was covering up.

(side note, but its common to see local Asian women with driving gloves, massive sun hats or even masks, umbrellas on sunny days etc. They know about sun damage and avoid it on their fair skin)

Now I get comments like "don't you age?!" and I joke about hey - remember when you all teased me for never getting a tan!

Quote:
Originally Posted by No_Go View Post
Having said that: skincare products largely work on the basis of placebo effect. There are 2-3 ingredients that make a difference (retinol, SPF, some acids) and that's about it. The rest is pure placebo but it is a pleasant sensation that we're beating age and/or genetics (in reality biology always wins but it is truly pleasant to mislead ourselves )
Yep, I am going to brag here. People comment on my skin often. They act flabbergasted when I tell them I am 39, and say that the skin on my face makes me appear 10-15 years younger.

You know what got my skin really glowing? Simplifying my routine.

I use Cetaphil cleanser twice a day. A daytime retinal cream with SPF, and a night time retinal cream.

Thats it. This has taken my what used to be blotchy complexion with oily and dry zones to SMOOTH, clear, moisturized and supple.

I used to sell hocus pocus for $100 a half once. I have used some spendy skin care regimes as I was a rep for them in college. My skin looks better now than it ever did with this very very simple and cheap routine.
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Old 3rd January 2018, 8:52 PM   #44
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Today my daughter and I were heading out and apparently my talking messed up her make up routine as she was getting ready.

She complained that I set her back 20 minutes because she had to start over. 20 MINUTES? for MAKE UP???

No wonder why that kid always runs late
lol make up is serious business. Seriously though, I was in a rush and poked my eye with a mascara wand and started crying and after it stopped 5 min later I had to spend 20 minutes washing the raccoon eyes off because it was waterproof (it was napalm proof...even scrubbing with olive oil barely got it off). Then I just put in eye drops and went without it.

I don't use heavy skin care. I have seen skin of people who use it vs never did and I am not that convinced of result. My aunt is Korean and skin care obsessed and my mom who doesn't believe in that stuff and rarely puts anything on her face. They both have great skin, but I actually think my mom's might be a bit better. Also I've heard prescription retin A not the kind that you can get over the counter can thin your skin over time so I'm scared off that stuff. But if you have bad acne scaring or melasma or such I can definitely see how some might find it worth it. I just think it's too harsh for my skin...


I feel like stuff with big result probably comes with a big downside (and probably health) I may very well be wrong. But if it's that effective what else is it doing. Like Latisse((bimatroprost). It's for serious glaucoma but also makes eyelashes grow longer. When everyone jumped on that wagon, I stayed off. Recently I heard it long term it dissolves fatty tissue on eyes (another side effect besides the already known eye color change)

Last edited by Cookiesandough; 3rd January 2018 at 9:02 PM..
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Old 3rd January 2018, 9:02 PM   #45
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i am not a fan of mirrors i already feel ugly from a distance i don't need a close up ...i have perfected no mirror make up sometimes for church.....the heat is bad where i live at the moment .......so make up tends to melt off me.....i thought once i would set it on with hairspray....didnt work....:0)...my face felt really wrong....sticky...

i used to wear makeup all the time my ex said i look like a completely different person with makeup....he said i dont look like me.......and he asked me to take off the mask....so i did....i have always loved skin care products and interestingly enough my ex gave me skin care stuff for christmas....

i love the feeling of clean skin..makes me feel younger....not look younger but actually feel it.....i love soap.....adore it......especially soap from lush their karma soap...got that for christmas too....the smell of soap..... the silky feel of soap....makes me feel alive and bouncy ........

makeup actually makes me feel dirty......maybe its an ex hooker thing or the ex comment thing about me looking like a completely different person .....its not the mask i am supposed to wear.....


i would rather my skin felt and smelt delicious especially my face.....i make sure I have soft skin so ..lush products are the bomb and sukin...love sukin...my face......is kissable.....smilin....deb.........


............
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