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Having a bubbly personality comes across as less professional?


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Old 9th December 2017, 8:16 AM   #1
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Having a bubbly personality comes across as less professional?

Would you consider a colleague who is bubby and cheerful always, to be less professional or less intelligent or capable of growth?
Is some level of constant seriousness needed for success at work?
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Old 9th December 2017, 8:59 AM   #2
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Would you consider a colleague who is bubby and cheerful always, to be less professional or less intelligent or capable of growth?
Is some level of constant seriousness needed for success at work?
if your job is hostess at a high-end restaurant then being bubbly and cheerful is a big asset. If you're an auditor then having these traits would probably be a liability.
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Old 9th December 2017, 9:03 AM   #3
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I wouldn't say 'constant seriousness' is optimal but yes, it can actually be a struggle to work with folk who are 'constantly bubbly'.
Just the same as working with constant complainers.

Just taking those two types - the bubbly and the complainers I have experienced both over the years and with both there can be too much distraction from the task at hand I have found.

I won't automatically categorise nor judge someone but by experience those two types can find it difficult to understand why something is urgent when it's explained to them (as a prime example).
So, when delegated a task a laissez-faire response is often returned and then the task at hand is left undone or mildly attempted with no communication coming up to the deadline meaning it becomes a case of trial and error as to whether a person can be relied upon or not.

This is just my experience and without explaining details comes over possibly as a generalisation. On occasions, some have come through and excelled, the majority have not.
However, when asking for a task to be completed I want to see micro expressions and body language to indicate a person understands and is clear on what needs to be done - which requires a level of seriousness.
Plus too much bubbliness when people are under pressure can come over quite badly as insensitivity.

We have a bubbly someone who laughs raucously when anyone admits to a mistake and will laughingly tell everyone and anyone about it.
This has seriously affected ways in which our team work and communicate issues.
She is not a completely constantly bubbly person though as she will burst into tears if she doesn't understand something or makes a mistake.
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Old 9th December 2017, 11:42 AM   #4
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Even though I am not as bubbly and cheerful as in your description, I do recognize some traits.

I can be a distraction for colleagues indeed from time to time.
What I also notice is that some people don't take me seriously.

As I am ambitious in getting ahead in my career, I think I will have to make adjustments in my behaviour.

It will be difficult as it truly is my personality, but I will have to manage.
I guess this is where professional and personal are seperated...
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Old 9th December 2017, 12:17 PM   #5
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Even though I am not as bubbly and cheerful as in your description, I do recognize some traits.

I can be a distraction for colleagues indeed from time to time.
What I also notice is that some people don't take me seriously.

As I am ambitious in getting ahead in my career, I think I will have to make adjustments in my behaviour.

It will be difficult as it truly is my personality, but I will have to manage.
I guess this is where professional and personal are seperated...
A temporary distraction is OK - we all need a bit of banter a couple of times a day but if it's more than that it can severely distress a person who is trying t concentrate.

The distraction I meant in my earlier post though is not how you have understood it. You have misconstrued me I think.
It's a bubbly's person's own distraction in that (and this is what I see often with bubbly and complainers) bubbly person is so distracted by their own bubbliness that they're not aware of things going on around them or aware something might be crucially important.

I have an issue currently with someone at work which is driving me crazy - she is a combination of bubbly and complainer - she has no idea of deadlines even when they are laid out in black and white.
Two people haven't been paid commissions this month due to her lack of response to very simple queries.
I unfortunately sit close enough to hear her and she has been stopping work and singing (an awful lot), facebook chatting with people, snap chatting, chatting about clothes, hair, shoes and also complaining she has no time for this and that and the other all this last week.
One of the company Directors sits a little closer to her than me and he has called her out many times the last few months about her noise - but she doesn't see it as a serious thing yet.

It's affecting a lot of people actually but she is too happy to have any concerns for others. Or too unhappy when she complains loudly to have consideration for those around her relying on her work and her input.

If you feel your behaviour means people don't take you seriously then you can step up productivity wise or tone down the bubbly so they can feel from your body language and expressions that you do take them seriously.
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Old 9th December 2017, 1:10 PM   #6
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I have a girl like this in my office. Sometimes she chats so much to the point of her being annoying and very distracting. She likes to talk out loud about anything she does. She will also often walk up to me and tap me on the shoulder (even when I have headhpones) and launch on at least 20 minutes of talk about make up/clothes/celebrities. Generally stuff that doesn't interest me at the best of times, let alone when I am trying to work.

She means well so it's hard for me to say anything. She tones it down when there are others in the office. Fridays it's often just us and I am often tempted to work from home because she breaks my concentration so often.
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Old 9th December 2017, 1:15 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by GemmaUK View Post
I wouldn't say 'constant seriousness' is optimal but yes, it can actually be a struggle to work with folk who are 'constantly bubbly'.
Just the same as working with constant complainers.

Just taking those two types - the bubbly and the complainers I have experienced both over the years and with both there can be too much distraction from the task at hand I have found.

I won't automatically categorise nor judge someone but by experience those two types can find it difficult to understand why something is urgent when it's explained to them (as a prime example).
So, when delegated a task a laissez-faire response is often returned and then the task at hand is left undone or mildly attempted with no communication coming up to the deadline meaning it becomes a case of trial and error as to whether a person can be relied upon or not.

This is just my experience and without explaining details comes over possibly as a generalisation. On occasions, some have come through and excelled, the majority have not.
However, when asking for a task to be completed I want to see micro expressions and body language to indicate a person understands and is clear on what needs to be done - which requires a level of seriousness.
Plus too much bubbliness when people are under pressure can come over quite badly as insensitivity.

We have a bubbly someone who laughs raucously when anyone admits to a mistake and will laughingly tell everyone and anyone about it.
This has seriously affected ways in which our team work and communicate issues.
She is not a completely constantly bubbly person though as she will burst into tears if she doesn't understand something or makes a mistake.
The coworker you describe doesn't sound like a bubbly person at all, or at least it's not being bubbly that has affected your team. It sounds like she is mean and emotionally unstable and that is what makes things difficult for your coworker's.

For the most part I really like the bubbly people at work. They tend to be positive thinkers and they make me smile. I don't think the level of someone's bubbliness (is that a word?) has anything to do with their ability to do their job. If they are not getting their work completed then that's a problem that needs to be addressed but the problem isn't that the person is bubbly. Maybe the problem is that they are lazy, or disorganized, or they just don't care. It's not about being bubbly.
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Old 9th December 2017, 8:30 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by SerCay View Post
Would you consider a colleague who is bubby and cheerful always, to be less professional or less intelligent or capable of growth?
Is some level of constant seriousness needed for success at work?
Honestly? Yes.

Being funny here and there is okay but someone constantly 'bubbly and cheerful' at work is just plain immature. Unless one is comedian they can keep their 'bubbliness' outside their work hours.
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Old 10th December 2017, 3:15 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by anika99 View Post
The coworker you describe doesn't sound like a bubbly person at all, or at least it's not being bubbly that has affected your team. It sounds like she is mean and emotionally unstable and that is what makes things difficult for your coworker's.
No, much like ES' colleague she is bubbly but so bubbly to distraction point so just unaware. She means well but gets it wrong sometimes.
This is how bubbly can be insensitive/inconsiderate.
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