LoveShack.org Community Forums

Reload this Page LoveShack.org Community Forums > Platonic > Business and Professional Relationships

How do you deal with millenials?


Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

Like Tree38Likes
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 13th July 2017, 8:27 AM   #1
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 168
How do you deal with millenials?

Hi all:

I'm a software developer in my mid-50's looking to move into management. In my last couple of interviews I've been asked how would I deal with millenial coders under my supervision. My answer is that I get along well with them because we've worked together at the same level for the past few years and I feel I have earned their trust and respect.

I reckon that employers that ask that question are clueless. Granted, these are software developers with talent, but I don't see them too different from other millenials working in other industries.

Can anybody suggest answers to the question? Am I the clueless one?

Thanks,
__________________
JF
JFReyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 9:37 AM   #2
Established Member
 
Rockdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Indiana
Posts: 264
I'm a mid 50's employer. Old school very hard working and self made. I can tell you I'm clueless how to effectively manage such a self entitled "me" generation and make a profit. I've recently been through attempting to restaff some positions and shake my head at the state of where things have gotten.
__________________
Do you want to be right or do you want to be happy?
Rockdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 10:12 AM   #3
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockdad View Post
I'm a mid 50's employer. Old school very hard working and self made. I can tell you I'm clueless how to effectively manage such a self entitled "me" generation and make a profit. I've recently been through attempting to restaff some positions and shake my head at the state of where things have gotten.
Thanks for your reply. If I may ask, if you were looking for a supervisor to such millenial staff and asked the same question, what would be an acceptable/credible answer? Or would you look for an "old millenial" (30-37 y/o) to fill the position?
JFReyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 11:27 AM   #4
Established Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 735
In my experience I feel in management to be successful you have to cater to employees strengths and not expose their weaknesses.


Millennials I have worked with are in my opinion are overly sensitive in many cases and get flustered, openly frustrated and sometimes down on their abilities fairly quickly. Less of an, "I'll hammer away at this until I get through it and collapse at the end" and more of a, "I hit a wall and collapse attitude". I am not trying to generalize, it's just my experience managing millennials on projects.


My answer would be somewhere along the lines of; to effectively manage a team, you have to exploit the strengths of each individual and lessen the impact of their weaknesses. Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses that you have to manage, and if one particular age group has a certain set of weaknesses it is no different than managing say, an older age group that has a different set of common weaknesses.


I'd probably drop an analogy like if I managed a baseball team and have an older guy that hits .350 but is slow as the day is long, he wouldn't be the ideal leadoff hitter. A guy hitting .200 but runs like the wind might be more valuable as the leadoff allowing him to showcase his speed in a way that helps the team best, despite his lower batting average.
JFReyes likes this.
ChatroomHero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 12:02 PM   #5
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChatroomHero View Post
In my experience I feel in management to be successful you have to cater to employees strengths and not expose their weaknesses.
I agree but instead of expose I would offer to help them overcome their weaknesses, shall they ask for it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChatroomHero View Post
My answer would be somewhere along the lines of; to effectively manage a team, you have to exploit the strengths of each individual and lessen the impact of their weaknesses. Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses that you have to manage, and if one particular age group has a certain set of weaknesses it is no different than managing say, an older age group that has a different set of common weaknesses.
That's a great answer, thank you!

Regards,

Last edited by JFReyes; 13th July 2017 at 12:05 PM..
JFReyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 12:10 PM   #6
Established Member
 
Elswyth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 24,801
How old is the person interviewing you?

It's a rough question and IMO even leans a little bit towards age discrimination, which I've heard is an issue among software developers (some of the older devs feel like they're being negatively discriminated against). I doubt you would have been asked the same question if you were a millennial yourself. It's like a woman being asked how she'd deal with male colleagues - I don't think it's an appropriate question.

But that being said, I think your answer was perfect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockdad View Post
I'm a mid 50's employer. Old school very hard working and self made. I can tell you I'm clueless how to effectively manage such a self entitled "me" generation and make a profit. I've recently been through attempting to restaff some positions and shake my head at the state of where things have gotten.
A large % of the most profitable companies in the world are tech companies, whose main workforce consists primarily of millennials. I doubt the issue lies with the millennials.
__________________
~Perfection is about accepting that we cannot control everything and letting go of some of our preconceived notions.~ -Spiritofnow-
Elswyth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 12:13 PM   #7
Established Member
 
coolheadal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: South Florida
Posts: 3,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by JFReyes View Post
Hi all:

I'm a software developer in my mid-50's looking to move into management. In my last couple of interviews I've been asked how would I deal with millenial coders under my supervision. My answer is that I get along well with them because we've worked together at the same level for the past few years and I feel I have earned their trust and respect.

I reckon that employers that ask that question are clueless. Granted, these are software developers with talent, but I don't see them too different from other millenials working in other industries.

Can anybody suggest answers to the question? Am I the clueless one?

Thanks,

Your not seeing the picture here. They want to know what you would do and how you would handle it with other coders. I am software developer as well as with other things I do. I learn and grow in the information technology world for many years I care not to say how many! LOL You just say next time if they ask that question, you can deal with anything that arises in any situations with confidence. You need to be a leader you also need to understand what the coder is going through, the pressure and issues they face. Not just about you. Do not answer like the question is only about you. This is a broad question they're trying to figure out how you think and what you would do in certain situations when it come to employees. You can't think in the box you have to think out of it also. Got to be role model also. Show some compassion for them too the employees. A lot of manager yell at them and don't understand what they're going through when your on a timeline schedule. You got to get with it! Good luck and just remember what I said you will ace it and get the job, if you don't you did something wrong. Don't play with your and hands, look direct into the interview face and eyes and take charge of the interview. Hey you want to be the manager IT Manager also goes under IT Director. Pays a lot of money! Good Luck and don't screw it up next time!
__________________
Age doesn't matter, but Love does matter! Which love it's the magical one "I love you" also I am in love with you" More powerful than anyone age! If you really love that person you are so interested in you would move heavens and mountains to reach them!'

Last edited by coolheadal; 13th July 2017 at 12:19 PM..
coolheadal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 12:39 PM   #8
Established Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 2,752
I agree that this seems to show some age discrimination. It sounds the person asking it has some strong feelings on the different generations and managing them and while their does need to be some knowledge of generational differences it seems very specific and pointed like he has a strong belief in the right way vs. the wrong way to manage millennials.

Honestly I would do a little reading on the generational differences, you can probably find some resources online, at the library or the book store for that, BUT I would also try to see if you can get some insight from people you trust at work and see if you can find out what the "right" answer to this question is.

Like if the person interviewing you believes that millennials are all lazy, then you're answer should be about how you'll make sure that they'll meet all their objectives. If he believes millennials are the companies best resource, then you should talk about how you'll harness their creativity and drive. Etc. etc.

Also I know you are paraphrasing your answer, but I hope you had a lot more depth to it than that. I mean if you believe that your role as a manager isn't to manage, but to use say a servant leadership model and focus your energies around enabling maximum productivity for your team, then say that. Don't just say, well I work with them and we get along.

Depending on your organizational structure, you may need to have more of a true managerial type role over the developers regardless of whether that is what you truly believe or not. I'm not sure if you are talking about more of a project manager role or a supervisor role, but as much as some of the theories say that management isn't necessary and you can just let project teams go and they'll achieve success, that doesn't always blend with reality.

This is probably getting too detailed for a general discussion board though, if you want PM me as I have experience as a software developer and a project manager with leadership expectations and can give you some more targeted thoughts.
JFReyes likes this.
GunslingerRoland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th July 2017, 2:51 PM   #9
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by GunslingerRoland View Post
I agree that this seems to show some age discrimination. It sounds the person asking it has some strong feelings on the different generations and managing them and while their does need to be some knowledge of generational differences it seems very specific and pointed like he has a strong belief in the right way vs. the wrong way to manage millennials.

Honestly I would do a little reading on the generational differences, you can probably find some resources online, at the library or the book store for that, BUT I would also try to see if you can get some insight from people you trust at work and see if you can find out what the "right" answer to this question is.

Like if the person interviewing you believes that millennials are all lazy, then you're answer should be about how you'll make sure that they'll meet all their objectives. If he believes millennials are the companies best resource, then you should talk about how you'll harness their creativity and drive. Etc. etc.

Also I know you are paraphrasing your answer, but I hope you had a lot more depth to it than that. I mean if you believe that your role as a manager isn't to manage, but to use say a servant leadership model and focus your energies around enabling maximum productivity for your team, then say that. Don't just say, well I work with them and we get along.

Depending on your organizational structure, you may need to have more of a true managerial type role over the developers regardless of whether that is what you truly believe or not. I'm not sure if you are talking about more of a project manager role or a supervisor role, but as much as some of the theories say that management isn't necessary and you can just let project teams go and they'll achieve success, that doesn't always blend with reality.
Thank you for your insight, there's some good advice there.
JFReyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th July 2017, 9:35 AM   #10
Established Member
 
Rockdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Indiana
Posts: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by JFReyes View Post
Thanks for your reply. If I may ask, if you were looking for a supervisor to such millenial staff and asked the same question, what would be an acceptable/credible answer? Or would you look for an "old millenial" (30-37 y/o) to fill the position?
My experience is I prefer older employees. The younger ones might very well be capable, have aptitude and in my business the physical energy. However that doesn't make a dependable employee. The younger they are the more they miss work or are on the phone dealing with their personal crisis.

If I come off cynical and I may very well be after 25 years of it.
preraph and knabe like this.
Rockdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th July 2017, 3:26 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,254
Quote:
A large % of the most profitable companies in the world are tech companies, whose main workforce consists primarily of millennials. I doubt the issue lies with the millennials.
To be frank, this remark is WHY many older managers and employers are dubious of a portion of the millennial and younger workers. There is a defensiveness, lack of respect, and unwillingness to take responsibility that tends to seep out.

I've never had a problem with younger colleagues. In my last job I somehow kind of because a "mom" to some of them But in order for an employee to contribute, they need to be dependable, productive, professional, and willing to take constructive criticism. A portion of the generation who was told every breath they took was "awesome" and "terrific" didn't develop those qualities.
knabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th July 2017, 4:35 PM   #12
Established Member
 
CautiouslyOptimistic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Northeast USA
Posts: 2,232
I think you should craft your answer around the types of things that are important to Millenials when they are looking for a job. Google it, read articles. For example, flexibility is huge. How would you, as a manager, handle requests for flexible work schedules, work at home benefits, etc.? (Hint: in an interview, a good response would be to give this as an example of a need/want they might have, and ask the interviewer if they know what the company policy on that is).
JFReyes likes this.

Last edited by CautiouslyOptimistic; 14th July 2017 at 4:54 PM..
CautiouslyOptimistic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th July 2017, 8:57 AM   #13
Established Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by CautiouslyOptimistic View Post
I think you should craft your answer around the types of things that are important to Millenials when they are looking for a job. Google it, read articles. For example, flexibility is huge. How would you, as a manager, handle requests for flexible work schedules, work at home benefits, etc.? (Hint: in an interview, a good response would be to give this as an example of a need/want they might have, and ask the interviewer if they know what the company policy on that is).
Great ideas, thank you!
JFReyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th July 2017, 1:36 PM   #14
Established Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 17,503
If someone asked me that question, I'd have to ask them what they mean, what they view the differences between millennials and others, honestly. Because if the guy asking is a millennial, it's a trap. If he's not, what is his issue with them and then you could give a better answer. So I'd probably say "In regards to?" I mean any answer that says you'd treat them differently than anyone else in the workplace -- well, that would be wrong. So maybe "I'd hold all employees to whatever standard the company sets" might be another way to answer it.
__________________
"I care not much for a man's religion whose dog and cat are not better for it." -- Abraham Lincoln
preraph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th July 2017, 1:56 PM   #15
Established Member
 
amaysngrace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Jersey Shore
Posts: 23,324
If they earned a computer engineering degree not only are they intelligent but also hard working. They also are a lot more diverse in the acceptance of others so perhaps that old boss could learn a thing or two from a millennial.
__________________
just dance
amaysngrace is offline   Reply With Quote
 

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

 

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is there a way to force yourself to turn deal breakers into non deal breakers? NJ123 General Relationship Discussion 90 21st October 2016 11:01 AM
Recent Criminal Convictions-Deal or no Deal Ponzoli Dating 6 7th November 2007 5:30 PM
Would this be a deal breaker for you, or no big deal? Tangerina Dating 7 7th May 2007 12:07 PM
Please help me deal with this... KC514 Breaks and Breaking Up 8 25th December 2005 10:06 AM

 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 9:55 AM.

Please note: The suggestions and advice offered on this web site are opinions only and are not to be used in the place of professional psychological counseling or medical advice. If you or someone close to you is currently in crisis or in an emergency situation, contact your local law enforcement agency or emergency number.


Copyright © 1997-2013 LoveShack.org. All Rights Reserved.