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Giving my two weeks' notice today


Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

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Old 23rd May 2017, 7:17 AM   #1
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Giving my two weeks' notice today

Not sure if this is the right place to post this, but I'll keep it brief and fairly anonymous. After some consideration and heavy prayer, I've decided today to tell my boss I won't be returning to my position. Excited to make the leap of faith. I don't have another job lined up but have saved enough to get by. I am currently applying and know if worst comes to worst there are a lot of side gigs I can take to sustain me. But I do have faith I will find a job that pays better than the one I'm currently at.

Just a lot of little and big things that led to my decision. Ultimately it comes down to feeling disrespected, undervalued and a lack of trust. I no longer enjoy coming to work. It feels more like a burden and obligation than it does a place where I can grow and reach my maximum potential. I'm also excited to see where life takes me once I take this step of faith. I've been at this company the past five years, and feel overall that it's time for a change.

Guess I woke up this morning just knowing... it's time.

Anyone here with any stories about quitting a professional job without having another one lined up? Would appreciate any advice or just to even read your story of similar experiences. Anxious but mostly I feel excited for the new changes to come.
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Old 23rd May 2017, 7:29 AM   #2
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Yup I've done that several times in my career. And it was huge for me, because I am naturally a "planner" and not much of a risk-taker (when it comes to my career, anyway).

My only regret is that I stayed too long at jobs I didn't like. You're making the right choice.

Fortune favors the bold.
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Old 23rd May 2017, 8:11 AM   #3
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Yes, I quit a job without having one lined up. I had a verbally abusive boss who made it routine to pull a provider into an empty patient room, at least once a week, and yell at them. The rules were constantly changing based on my boss's mood and it was just too stressful and demoralizing to keep up with his mood swings. The final straw for me was when he pulled me into his office for 20mins and told me he straight up that he was "threatening me", trying to intimidate me, etc. I went home that weekend, checked my finances, talked to family and friends, bought gap health insurance, typed my resignation letter and never looked back. I felt much happier after I left. I went through a small portion of my savings until I got a part time job that allowed me to cover my expenses and then some. I've been taking my time to find a full time job with a more proper fit and believe I've finally found it! I should start my new full job next month.

Trust your gut, things will work out.
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Old 23rd May 2017, 10:56 PM   #4
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You can only take so much. Funny how people above you in a job have all this power and when you remove yourself, they have no power at all. How crazy it is to put up with someone when you need the $ or are in a bad predicament.
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Old 24th May 2017, 1:46 AM   #5
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YES. I hate my job. A year ago I loved it. a major change happened, alot of people left. People who had been there 20 + years. I don't enjoy going to work. I cry my eyes out every day.

But there are bills to pay. its good pay but they don't Care about people, we are just a number. I admire your courage. I myself keep a look out every week. Something will come up. I've been with them nearly 15 years and I need to look out for myself because companies aren't loyal.

I am happy you are relieved and happy. Fingers crossed you find some thing and fingers crossed for me.
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Old 24th May 2017, 6:24 AM   #6
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Sounds really scary & involves too much risk. I'd have the other job lined up because it's much easier to get a job when you have one.

That said best wishes. I hope you get everything you want
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Old 24th May 2017, 4:35 PM   #7
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I agree with the above. It is much easier to get a job when you already have one.
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Old 26th May 2017, 9:02 PM   #8
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Gave my notice. Weight off my shoulder. Felt sooooo good. I like leaving on my terms as opposed to feeling oppressed all year long. Nothing empowers you like having the ability to walk away from something that no longer meets your expectations.
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Old 27th May 2017, 12:40 PM   #9
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I have previously quit jobs because I also felt undervalued.

I was fed up of colleagues not pulling their weight and getting away with murder. I believed I worked really hard and didn't feel appreciated and it really took its toll on my morale.

Good luck in your next venture and I hope you are treated well.
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Old 29th May 2017, 4:49 AM   #10
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One of the biggest let downs is that you arrive to work and keep busy and do a good job but it's not enough. Others are goofing around or know the boss isn't there so they slack. Others have dated mngrs and get treated with a lot of preference.
Mgt knows your a good worker and they pull a you can work faster or they add more tasks and make it hectic.
It just seems you can't win... You have coworkers with bad work ethic and mgt looking to exploit you.
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Old 1st June 2017, 11:12 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoolJoe View Post
Not sure if this is the right place to post this, but I'll keep it brief and fairly anonymous. After some consideration and heavy prayer, I've decided today to tell my boss I won't be returning to my position. Excited to make the leap of faith. I don't have another job lined up but have saved enough to get by. I am currently applying and know if worst comes to worst there are a lot of side gigs I can take to sustain me. But I do have faith I will find a job that pays better than the one I'm currently at.

Just a lot of little and big things that led to my decision. Ultimately it comes down to feeling disrespected, undervalued and a lack of trust. I no longer enjoy coming to work. It feels more like a burden and obligation than it does a place where I can grow and reach my maximum potential. I'm also excited to see where life takes me once I take this step of faith. I've been at this company the past five years, and feel overall that it's time for a change.

Guess I woke up this morning just knowing... it's time.

Anyone here with any stories about quitting a professional job without having another one lined up? Would appreciate any advice or just to even read your story of similar experiences. Anxious but mostly I feel excited for the new changes to come.
Yes, I had one job that was so toxic, I literally walked out in the middle of the day. I know that's a tough spot to be in, leaving without a back up job, but if it's that toxic you're probably better off.

After I walked out, the next day I put on my suit and tie and hit the pavement, i.e. literally walked into places I wanted to work and passed out my resume and introduced myself. I had to work two jobs for a while to pay the bills, but then found a great job.

How long did you work there? The reason I ask is when I walked out, I had only been with the company for 90 days so my resume did not have any glaring gaps. If you have been there for a while, it might be a little harder to explain why you are out of work, especially if they want a reference.
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Old 7th June 2017, 12:38 AM   #12
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When I quit, I was actually leaving my career, that's why I didn't have another job lined up. The job was fine, boss was great, good pay, no complaints. So it was quite the leap of faith, but a couple of things made it easier at the time: 1. I wondered why I didn't quit earlier. 2. my boss said come back anytime. 3. colleagues congratulated me, said they envied me.
Career change worked out and I never looked back.
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Old 7th June 2017, 1:48 AM   #13
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If possible, try to quit/resign on good terms. If you cannot find another job before your savings runs dry, you may be able to get a job with your past employer. It is not the ideal situation, to be sure, but neither is being homeless and hungry.

Prior to my kids I quit with confidence that it was for the best. Once my kids were born, I did not quit a job unless I had something else lined up.

If you can get a letter or two of recommendation, it may help with your job search. I would try to get at least one from management, and another from a coworker. More can be helpful, as it gives you options to choose from. When I was in charge of hiring, I not only wanted to know how a potential employee did with management, but also with their coworkers.

Many jobs have minimal/no interaction between the boss and their employees, but management tends to be aware of any issues with a worker. A coworker is a good gauge of people skills, and those were essential in my particular industry. Depending on the job you're looking for you may, or may not, need them. I always tried to plan ahead, just in case.

Best of luck.
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Old 7th June 2017, 3:28 PM   #14
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Officially checked out yesterday, exactly two weeks after giving notice.

Said my goodbyes and see ya laters to the people who mattered, received encouraging love and support and walked out of there with my head held high.

5 good years was basically crumbled by 5 bittersweet weeks where I felt mistreated and mishandled. But it's all good. Everything happens for a reason. Got an interview with a new company tomorrow. Moving on up!
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Old 7th June 2017, 3:32 PM   #15
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Best of luck on the interview.
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