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"Different" reaction to reject letter


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Old 22nd February 2015, 3:45 PM   #1
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Arrow "Different" reaction to reject letter

(This was relayed to me second-hand)
Woman I’ll call Jane was scheduled to go in for a job interview a few weeks ago. The position was Exec Assistant to the boss in a mid-sized consulting firm. Jane was very unhappy in her current job, and the new job had several plusses (much higher salary, easier commute, more challenging duties). Jane arranged to take a personal day off for the interview, which was scheduled for sometime in the afternoon.

But sometime that morning Jane got a call…”Sorry, but we’ve decided to hire another candidate that we interviewed yesterday.” (Without even bothering to meet Jane.) “The person we selected is just so strong in several areas; we decided to make her an offer on the spot).” Then (from what I hear) the staff member went on and on praising the other applicant until Jane finally had to end the call.

Jane was extremely disappointed and angry that they didn’t even give her a chance and that she wasted a personal day off. But, there was nothing she could do.

A few days later in the mail Jane received a reject letter via snail mail (unusual these days). “Thanks……..we were impressed……we selected another applicant. If things don’t work out, we will be in touch.”

So, at the bottom of the letter Jane wrote “If things don’t work out, that will be your problem. I don’t want to work there.” And mailed it back to whoever sent it!!

Okay, she could have just tossed it, and yes, it’s a small world…….one never knows what bridge they’re burning. But when I look at the total picture, I have to admit I kind of like what Jane did. She was treated shabbily/rudely and I can understand her not wanting to ever have anything to do with that company.
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Old 22nd February 2015, 3:57 PM   #2
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Brilliant in theory.
I mean, who doesn't want to get the upper hand with a "Boom!" statement?

In practice?
not so...

Talk about sooting yourself in the foot. Now if their current successful candidate turns out to be a dud, she'll be passed over.
Then her firm may have cut-backs and she's made redundant.
She already dislikes the job enough to want to quit anyway...

The workplace, if she's in a specialised field, is a small world.

And in the field of Consultancy, Jim knows Bob, knows Mike, Knows Al, knows Dave, knows Derek, knows Brian, knows Jim.....

I guarantee that letter will be round offices like wildfire.... You know, Facebook an' all that?

Last edited by LoveShack.org Moderator; 22nd February 2015 at 8:49 PM..
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Old 22nd February 2015, 9:40 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by badpenny View Post
Brilliant in theory.
I mean, who doesn't want to get the upper hand with a "Boom!" statement?

In practice?
not so...

Talk about sooting yourself in the foot. Now if their current successful candidate turns out to be a dud, she'll be passed over.
Then her firm may have cut-backs and she's made redundant.
She already dislikes the job enough to want to quit anyway...

The workplace, if she's in a specialised field, is a small world.

And in the field of Consultancy, Jim knows Bob, knows Mike, Knows Al, knows Dave, knows Derek, knows Brian, knows Jim.....

I guarantee that letter will be round offices like wildfire.... You know, Facebook an' all that?

Lots of “if”s.

Look, she already said she doesn’t want to work there. Jane lives in a large city and it’s not like that place is the only employer. There are other fish in the sea.

Sure, it’s a small world and Jim knows Bob who is married to Sue and knows Jerry’s cousin, etc. etc. But such is life. And I fail to see what Facebook (a pathetic juvenile waste of time) has to do with anything.

True, she doesn’t like her current job, but that doesn’t mean she’s going to get laid off or that if she does that she would even consider going to work for those people. I certainly see no reason for her to wait on the edge of her chair for a call from the very people who already jerked her around.

Your reply is an example of how employers are often successful at intimidating people (especially people with zero self-confidence) - even people who don’t/never have/never would want to work at their precious company.

Last edited by applej4; 22nd February 2015 at 9:48 PM..
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Old 23rd February 2015, 5:03 PM   #4
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There may be a lot of 'ifs' but the fact is, and the fact remains, people DO talk.
There was the recent classic case of a guy who behaved rudely to a fellow passenger on the London Underground, and swore at him for getting in the way.

That same afternoon, said foulmouthed-passenger had to attend an interview, and guess who the interviewer was?

Yup.
The fellow passenger he had rudely sworn at, only that morning.

My goodness, I mean, what are the chances, huh?

Rare.
Remote.

But still possible.

It's a matter of form, a question of professionalism.
What she did was funny on the face of it, but actually irresponsible and childish.

You simply don't soil the bed you sleep in.

If you'll pardon the metaphor.
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Old 24th February 2015, 1:59 AM   #5
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(This was relayed to me second-hand)
Then it may not be 100% correct since you heard this 2nd hand and not from Jane's mouth.

Either way, she shouldn't have been so pissy with them, if anything, she should have said if another opportunity comes up, I'd love interview for a different position.

Don't burn bridges. People talk, especially in certain fields, it's a close network!
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Old 24th February 2015, 2:04 AM   #6
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But sometime that morning Jane got a call…”Sorry, but we’ve decided to hire another candidate that we interviewed yesterday.” (Without even bothering to meet Jane.) “The person we selected is just so strong in several areas; we decided to make her an offer on the spot).” Then (from what I hear) the staff member went on and on praising the other applicant until Jane finally had to end the call.
1)At least they called her to tell her.
2)They did apologize.
3)They told her why the position was filled.

-1)Sure, they went into too much detail about the person who got the job, but my guess the person who relayed this information was just the interviewer and not a "Boss". They were told to call "Jane". Possible that the person just didn't know when to shut up.
Quote:

Okay, she could have just tossed it, and yes, it’s a small world…….one never knows what bridge they’re burning. But when I look at the total picture, I have to admit I kind of like what Jane did. She was treated shabbily/rudely and I can understand her not wanting to ever have anything to do with that company.
Bolded. What was so rude? See my points above. One negative. She wasn't treated poorly.

She totally took it personally and reacted without thinking. Unprofessional!
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Old 24th February 2015, 2:24 AM   #7
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Frustrating, but yeah I have actually had an employer that previously passed me up to hire someone else. That person ended up not working out and they did want to hire me. However, a month had passed and I had just started another job so I had to decline. If they would have contacted me even just a few days earlier, I probably would have been working for them as the original hire did not work out. But yes, there is a chance Jane could have been contacted if the other candidate didn't work out. She'll never know now.
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Old 24th February 2015, 2:33 AM   #8
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Very unprofessional. If I were to find out about that letter, I would question what else she might do if I were to hire her, so I wouldn't. I'd question her ability to remain professional with her coworkers.
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Old 24th February 2015, 4:32 AM   #9
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I had a phone interview once, and the person at the end had told me I would be contacted on whether or not I would come in for an in person interview within a week. Week goes by, no word, I send an inquiry email, no response. Send a second one two weeks, still nothing, but completely ignored. And this was after the fact that when setting up the phone interview, they would respond back fairly quickly.

I found it extremely disrespectful, particularly after telling me I would be contacted. However I didnt go off sending a rude email on the matter, I just left it be. But because of it, if the company ever tried to contact me again for a position (which they may in a year or so since now I am in the industry and companies tend to headhunt from others) I could never accept an offer from them, because of that experience. I would respectfully decline and tell them why in a professional manner if it ever came up, but I would not go off like some bully just stole my piece of candy, it would only serve to potentially hurt my career.
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Old 24th February 2015, 1:43 PM   #10
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Haha! Seriously?

So essentially you folks think Jane should have thanked them for blowing her off and taken them freshly baked cookies. Get real.

They hired someone on the spot without even having time to do a background or reference check. Most likely that person who was “soooo strong” is a BS artist who 1) lied about her skills/qualifications 2) will create chaos in the office 3) will steal/embezzle then disappear.

I agree that when things don’t "work out" and the you-know-what hits the fan, it will be THEIR problem. Jane definitely dodged a bullet.
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Old 24th February 2015, 2:34 PM   #11
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Haha! Seriously?

So essentially you folks think Jane should have thanked them for blowing her off and taken them freshly baked cookies. Get real.

They hired someone on the spot without even having time to do a background or reference check. Most likely that person who was “soooo strong” is a BS artist who 1) lied about her skills/qualifications 2) will create chaos in the office 3) will steal/embezzle then disappear.

I agree that when things don’t "work out" and the you-know-what hits the fan, it will be THEIR problem. Jane definitely dodged a bullet.
The way this post comes off, kinda sounds like you're Jane. No one here said to suck up to them, aka give them cookies, just to be a professional and a grown adult about it. At best nothing will come from it and at worst it will backfire on "Jane"
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Old 24th February 2015, 2:59 PM   #12
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Haha! Seriously?

So essentially you folks think Jane should have thanked them for blowing her off and taken them freshly baked cookies. Get real.

They hired someone on the spot without even having time to do a background or reference check. Most likely that person who was “soooo strong” is a BS artist who 1) lied about her skills/qualifications 2) will create chaos in the office 3) will steal/embezzle then disappear.

I agree that when things don’t "work out" and the you-know-what hits the fan, it will be THEIR problem. Jane definitely dodged a bullet.
She may have dodged a bullet but it's not in her self-interest to respond to the situation the way she did. She didn't get the job. I don't agree that the company handled it well, but it's their decision who they hire and who they don't. There is no place for bitter, childish behavior in most work situations. "Jane" displayed bitter, chilidish behavior in her response. The fact is, word gets around and the risk of this getting out is not worth the self-satisfaction of a "revenge" letter.
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Old 24th February 2015, 3:11 PM   #13
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The way this post comes off, kinda sounds like you're Jane. No one here said to suck up to them, aka give them cookies, just to be a professional and a grown adult about it. At best nothing will come from it and at worst it will backfire on "Jane"
Puhleeze.I'm retired. Not ancient but most likely old enough to be Jane's grandmother.Using your logic I could say that you are the flakey employer, or that you've had trouble finding a job so you put up with anything just to get on payroll somewhere/anywhere.
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Old 24th February 2015, 4:17 PM   #14
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Puhleeze.I'm retired. Not ancient but most likely old enough to be Jane's grandmother.Using your logic I could say that you are the flakey employer, or that you've had trouble finding a job so you put up with anything just to get on payroll somewhere/anywhere.
Yikes, defensive much? Anyways, when an employer passed me up and called a month later, they were eager for me to say yes, even though I just started another job. They were very pushy since it was through a staffing agency, saying they would request more pay for me and etc etc. I did not want to jump from job to job and I finally said "Look, if I would have known a few days earlier, I would have accepted. But I already started another job and I don't want to leave them high and dry after a few days of work. I will have to decline the offer at this time." It wasn't my fault they waited so long to get back to me. Like anyone else, I moved on to another opportunity. It was annoying how pushy they were, but I stayed professional. 6 months later I was called again as the position was open, but I had already secured a permanent position, so again I politely declined. But still a good example of why you do not want to burn bridges.
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Old 24th February 2015, 4:29 PM   #15
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Yeah, yeah, everybody has a "glad I didn't burn bridges because they later offered me my dream job" story. ho hum

While I’ve never written a snarky reply to a reject letter, I can think of two situations years ago where I interviewed for a job and on the way out the door decided “no way do I want to work here”. One of the employers called me and actually made an offer, and even though the money was a lot better, I said “No, thanks”. They asked why and I said “I’ve decided to keep looking. I wouldn't be happy there. Good luck with your search. Gotta go, buhbye.” They probably didn’t like being rejected but such is life.

When I was between jobs and money was tight (about 20+ yrs ago) I was called to interview for a job where the turnover was high (revolving door) and the boss who interviewed me was an obnoxious dick. Even sitting in the lobby I could overhear lots of gossip and office politics. I received a form reject letter, laughed, and tossed it into the trash. I continued to work temp jobs and eventually got a really good position from which I retired.
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