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Old 28th July 2014, 5:45 AM   #61
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Leigh. You are not being realistic and maybe not even honest You do not have experience with studying. I believe you left high school over a decade ago and have not completed any courses since

You may end up enjoying studying something but so far you have yet to do it.



Excuse me, I did a year 12 equivalent and did THE SAME exams of the same standard as other high schoolers in year 12 did.

I did this in 2009. Not over ten years ago.

I got my score. My score was not at the level of a genius but I would say a 92.3 ish when I only studied 3 to 4 solid hours per day of concentrated study, proves that I am hard working and have what it takes to do well academically if I work hard.

I would of course study more at college.

My score and the limited hours I did study, show that I have the ability to develop very effective study methods in order to do well with only a few hours a day study time.

I could have gotten mid 90's plus, if I had studied for 5 or 6 hours a day, I have no doubt.

I am ambitious and will do well, I am fairly sure of it.

It is called making up for lost time. Many people feel this way as I do. They have personal issues and then once they feel ready to dedicate everything to studying, they go for it and have a lot to prove to themselves.
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Old 28th July 2014, 5:48 AM   #62
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And LOL, what do you think I do all day whilst I am not working full time?

Well I do my course work for aged care/youth work, I am actually doing two diplomas at once.

Then I read articles of my interest all day. When I wasn't doing aged care and youth work, one diploma and one cert 3 in one hit, I would study materials online literally every day I wasn't working.

Love shack is the only bludging thing I do and I still feel as though I learn something on here. I learn a lot about people actually and relationships, stuff I relay back to people in real life as case studies.



I will better see things more clearly when I go alone to my uni for their information session where industry experts talk to us about their job, and the course co coordinators talk about the course material and answer any questions.
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Old 28th July 2014, 5:59 AM   #63
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And the reason I no longer work in the fitness industry is because it is disgusting and corrupt.

New trainers have to pay thousands to a gym in order to land a job at one, for the privilege of training there. They are not given new clients and have to go and convince people at he gym to use you. I HATE sales.

I stopped working for fitness when I left the state I was working in, for a women's gym where personal trainers got PAID to work on the floor, chow new members around and give them a briefing on using the equipment, and ensured everyone was using safe lifting practices.

I just cannot support paying thousands just to work at a place. It is not me, I am not a sales person. But I am good one on one with clients and I am sure I will use my qualification one day again, when I have the funds to develop my own private training.

My friend did aged care and then started his own training programs for the elderly. There is a lot of work for people who want to work with the elderly or mature aged, in fitness.If anything, I will get he aged care certificate and youth work diploma this year, and then I will update my Australian fitness accreditation.

Then I may be able to combine the fitness certificate three with aged care as my friend has done and become successful in.

I will NEVER go pay thousands to a greedy gym just to work for them, Sorry but they can make enough money of their trainers for the rent trainers have to pay.

I have a feeling that my imminent youth work diploma/cert 3 in aged care and cert 4 in fitness could all come in handy one day, especially when I graduate, I will have other credentials I can use.




Maybe a wellness centre wants a podiatrist who is also a personal trainer (I have a glowing reference), and is ALSO in aged care?????





I have now elaborated on yet another reason why I will probably nominate podiatry. I will have other credentials that could tie in nicely.





I did spend thousands on the fitness courses. I may use them again when I have another tertiary qualification, and can combine the disciplines of personal training and say podiatry if that is the path I choose to go down.
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Old 28th July 2014, 6:25 AM   #64
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Have you looked at exercise physiology? This might combine your interest in health, fitness and aged care quite nicely.
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Old 28th July 2014, 6:48 AM   #65
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Have you looked at exercise physiology? This might combine your interest in health, fitness and aged care quite nicely.



Physiotherapy is a good career which I don't have the grades to get into as it is a 96 entry required.........

However, the course advisor I spoke with today said that if I do well in podiatry, I can transfer to physiotherapy after one year of study.

So after year one of podiatry I will aim for high distinctions or AT LEAST distinctions. That way I can opt to transfer into physio if I so wish.

OR I could do well in a podiatry degree, and then after a few years I could gain entry into physiotherapy based on my podiatry degree, and probably knock a year off the physiotherapy degree.

This is a huge reason why I picked podiatry. Nuclear medicine or diagnostic radiotherapy don't have other degrees you can transfer to or chop and change with.

Where as podiatry can get you into other degrees after you graduate. I am into the health sciences so podiatry opens up doors for me if I turn out NOT to want to become a foot specialist.

Here are a few degrees I am interested in which I could do after podiatry, without having to complete the degrees in full:

- occupational therapy (low to medium job prospects, this degree would suit me)

- nutrition and dietetics (VIRTUALLY no prospects of employment unless you have another degree under your belt AND you are also a personal trainer)

- physiotherapy (VERY competitive. The brightest minds flock to physio due to such a high standard of entry, as in 99/100 scores at highly ranked universities.

- pharmacy ( little to no prospects, it is a very dire situation with pharmacy in Australia right now, new grads are yelling out DON'T DO IT)

- oral health therapy ( a fantastic little degree, heavy in areas I am good at, no hard physics I have never learnt before, and the job outlook is VERY GOOD)




I can transfer into ANY degree in the health sciences if I do podiatry. I can also combine my soon to be aged care certification, and certificate four in personal training with both look good together on a resume, for a job as a podiatrists.




My aim is to do extremely well in year one of podiatry so I have the option of getting into physiotherapy if I so choose, at a later date if I decide podiatry is not for me. Physiotherapy is a well paid and VERY challenging career.

Podiatrists the world over say that the job is repetitive and not very challenging and never really rises to become more challenging.

now, while I am totally fine with repetition and a laid back career, if I ever get bored of podiatry and need more of a challenge, I could do a number of things, such as apply to get into physiotherapy and knock 2 or so years off the degree.

I could do a masters in health science statistics or a graduate certificate in the health sciences.

I could open my own podiatry practice and update my knowledge in personal training and offer my personal training AND podiatry services in the one clinic.

I could do a bachelor or oral health therapy and would likely only need 1.5 to 2 years of it, and I could switch between careers to get a change every 5 years or so; be a dental assistant (dental therapists pull teeth, dental hygienists do not).






I am not sure what I would do if I didn't enjoy the bachelor of medical radiation science degree. There is less scope to get into other degrees since I KNOW I can ace podiatry, where as I DO NOT know if I can even pass the physics focused medical imaging degree.

What if after year one of medical imaging, I realise physics is not for me and do not have the marls to transfer degrees and need to start a new degree from scratch?







I have taken a few years of exercise and fitness due to my prior anorexia. I have reached my highest weight set point and done no exercise and ate whatever I wanted so I could learn to be happy without the obsessive fitness element I once had in my life.

I am at the stage now where I am very happy, happier than ever, at a more curvy weight. I am definitely ready for any fitness derived degree and industry.

Now all I care about is wanting to be healthier and exercise because I feel like a slob and I don't feel healthy. I don't have any obsessive need to be thin.
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Old 28th July 2014, 7:00 AM   #66
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Have you looked at exercise physiology? This might combine your interest in health, fitness and aged care quite nicely.



I think I will try to get into physiotherapy after year one of podiatry if I get good enough marks.

Physio ties into the aged care and personal training nicely.

It is highly competitive so I will need to determine how badly I want to do it, as it is a very difficult degree.

I may end up loving podiatry. Or if I love podiatry, graduate with good marks, and then want a career change five years later, I can likely get into physiotherapy and have a year or two knocked off the degree.
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Old 28th July 2014, 7:10 AM   #67
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Exercise physiology isn't physiotherapy. It is a different degree all together.

Sometimes Leigh I wonder if you actually read what people post
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Old 28th July 2014, 7:31 AM   #68
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Exercise physiology isn't physiotherapy. It is a different degree all together.

Sometimes Leigh I wonder if you actually read what people post


I thought you meant physiotherapy sorry.

A bachelor of exercise and sport science is the only degree pertaining to exercise physiology.

biomechanics
clinical exercise testing and prescription
exercise physiology
exercise testing and prescription
growth, development and ageing
motor control and learning
sport and exercise psychology.




Career options

Sports Administratoruon analytics link
Biomechanist
uon analytics link
Exercise Physiologist
uon analytics link
Cardiac Physiologistuon analytics link
Exercise Rehabilitation/Injury Management Advisorsuon analytics link
Lifestyle Co-ordinator
Player Development Manageruon analytics link
Sport Scientistuon analytics link
Sports and Exercise Physicianuon analytics link
Sports Development Officeruon analytics link
Strength and Conditioning Specialists





It is only a three year degree and not as intensive or hard to get into as physiotherapy. I could transfer after year one of podiatry and use my ATAR score to get in alone as my university only considers your highest score when accepting you into courses.
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Old 28th July 2014, 7:38 AM   #69
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I considered exercise science when I first did food science. It was my second choice. I was into personal training back then and thought both would be good career prospects when combined with my personal training.

Unfortunately, not even four year trained, accredited dieticians can get a job. Even the ones who do well. Food science enabled you to be a nutritionist which is ranked lower than a dietician. If dieticians can not get work, I am not sure how a nutritionist is supposed to.

A few people get 50K starting jobs as food science researchers at big companies. I heard of just one girl from my food science degree that obtained employment......

Exercise science apparently has low prospects for employment unless you have a CLEAR idea of what you want to do, and you follow it through with sheer determination, get volunteer experience in a relevant work place, and get good grades.

If I don't like podiatry though, I have a degree that does get credits for other health science degrees, as I also study very similar core subjects such as anatomy and physiology for the entire first year and biomechanics.

Exercise science and podiatry have a similar first year, and then they both go on to study biomechanics. I could likely transfer between degrees or, better still, get one degree and then only have to complete 1.5 years of the second degree.





I would really like the idea of sticking to podiatry and then study exercise science and get half the degree knocked off due to having a fair few overlapping courses.
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Old 28th July 2014, 7:47 AM   #70
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Exercise Physiology involves the study of the body’s response to physical activity. Exercise Physiologists are qualified allied health professionals who specialise in the delivery of exercise, lifestyle and behavioral modification programs for the prevention and management of chronic diseases and injuries




Pretty much all the reasons I originally became a personal trainer. Except I refuse to pay 1000's to work in a gym. I think these guys are disgusting for actually charging trainers 1000's just to work at their gym AND then charging them rent on top... When the gym makes mega profit from the clients alone...

I would love to still be doing personal training, except I hate the actual industry and I do not have the money to pay 1000s to the council to train people at beaches or parks.








Anyways, I prefer that podiatry is SPECIFIC, where as exercise science is not, it is very broad.

I think I could do quiet well if I started on podiatry, saved money, and then did exercise physiology and did the 1.5 or 2 year of the exercise and sports science degree.

It would be great to have my own practice where I could offer my services as a foot specialist, an exercise physiologist AND a personal trainer.

This would prevent the usual boredom most podiatrists face after the 5 year mark. I could perhaps use both podiatry and exercise physiology as careers to use interchangeably .






This is all hypothetical but it all sounds like it COULD work in theory.
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Old 28th July 2014, 7:53 AM   #71
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Oh.

To become an exercise physiologist:

An undergraduate degree followed by honours, masters or PhD in exercise science, sports science, human movement, physical education or related fields is necessary in this field.








If I wanted to go down the route of working with peoples entire bodies opposed to just the feet, I would be better off trying to get into physiotherapy through good marks received in the podiatry degree.

Or,if I got tired of working with purely feet, I could go and do a bachelor of physiotherapy and cut a year off the four year degree.

Something to consider later in life if I ever got tired of dealing with feet.
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Old 28th July 2014, 11:19 AM   #72
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I have explained multiple times that I have always been more Interested in science based degrees. Since forever.

Hence why I originally started one. I dropped put for reasons other than not being passionate.

Look I am self aware enough to know that I prefer science based degrees and dislike humanities.
Over the past two years, you have described yourself as being passionate (your word) about at least the following majors/professions: personal trainer, beauty therapist, food science/nutrition, fashion boutique owner, travel agent, dog walker, social work, and aged care, in addition to all the science based degrees you have been researching over the past couple of weeks. You've also pursued numerous certifications and diplomas in various areas (i.e., a youth diploma, beauty therapy) over the past two years. Did you finish any of them? It's fine if you've now decided you prefer science based degrees, but your past posts do not reflect that at all. I really think you need to just make a decision about your future. If you had made this decision two years ago, you would be over halfway there. Now you are off onto another trajectory in physiotherapy.

Your definition of "passion" for a career may be quite different than others. You seem to equate "passion" with what you are interested in at that moment, as opposed to something that is more steady, consistent, and ongoing. You tend to see this in people who are interested in the arts, who sometimes have to make a choice between following their "passion" (i.e. writing, acting, dancing, playing an instrument, art, cooking, gardening, starting their own business, etc.) or pursuing a career that is more stable and has a better chance of making a consistent living. How are you defining "passion"? Something you like reading about?
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Old 28th July 2014, 12:24 PM   #73
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I tried a series of short courses to see if I liked them. I never assumed they would be a life long career.

This is different - this is a bachelors degree or three or four years we are talking about.

Anatomy, physiology and areas of health science have ALWAYS BEEN MY NUMBER ONE INTEREST.

It is why I worked as a personal trainer for a while, years back, and also why I enrolled in a FOOD SCIENCE degree. Sadly, I was not in the state to re learn math as a mature aged student. Now I am ready to tackle any prior tutoring and additional effort I may need to put in above most normal students who have done math and physics more recently.

I have now decided to return to my strongest area of interest, which has always been anatomy, physiology and issues pertaining to health science.

Podiatry, oral heal and medical imaging are ALL to do with disease and working within this area on some level. They also contain strong anatomy and physiology in the first year of each degree.

My entire life I have had an interest in human anatomy and physiology, as well as chemistry and disease has also been something I have long been curious about since I was a child. I would obsessively ask my parents about all the above and I maintain that interest to the present day.

Social science and social work degrees, a few short courses in travel sales and beauty therapy, were passing phases; these are things I looked into because I wanted to avoid learning basic math and physics that is largely required for any degree pertaining to science.

When you suffer from a mental illness, you can barely read a page of a textbook much less face some difficult challenges such as re learning math or physics for a college level degree.....

Anatomy and physiology are areas I am very familiar with as well as being good at ROTE learning them. It makes sense to me to do something I have always had an interest in since I was little, and persevere in spite of the hard times, opposed to the things I tried to fill my time with due to wanting to avoid the re learning the math and physics for the degrees I truly wanted to do.




At the very least, I know a medical/applied health science style of degree is best suited to my natural strengths and interest levels.

The options I outlined regarding physio and so on and so forth, are BACK UP PLANS if say, I didn't like podiatry or medical imaging or oral health, which ever bachelor I decide to ultimately commit to. I highlighted that my uni does credit transfers and I can likely, if the degree "isn't" what I am after, transfer and maintain some credits, which will knock some time off the full, three or four year bachelor.




It wouldn't be the end of the world if I ended up hating a job in one medical/health science field, since I could transfer another medical based degree without having to do the ENTIRE bachelor from scratch! First year anatomy and physiology is a given for podiatry, oral health AND medical imaging. Oh and even Occupational health and therapy, not to mention exercise and sport science.

That is an entire first year of anatomy and physiology units I would not have to repeat, if I ended up hating the job OR if there were suddenly NO jobs.

Of course my goal is to stick to this next degree, and ensure it is the best one for me.
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Old 28th July 2014, 4:38 PM   #74
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Work in a career you love and you'll never work a day in your life - that's the mum my always pushed.


For a long time I wanted to be a footballer - it was achievable for a while, I played academy football, I got badly injured at the wrong time, put me out for months, I missed trials and what have you and just.. I never really got another lucky break.

Went into the fire service - I love it! Guess it wasn't my "career passion" in the sense it was what id dreamed of since I was a little boy. But when I sat down and was like "right so what do I want my job to be/to offer" it ticked every single box - I wanted to help people, make a difference, a physical job, a good career path, job security, follow in my granddads footsteps - so I was like this is what I want. And then I was lucky to get in first time cause normally it takes a couple of tries
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Old 28th July 2014, 5:19 PM   #75
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Work in a career you love and you'll never work a day in your life - that's the mum my always pushed.


For a long time I wanted to be a footballer - it was achievable for a while, I played academy football, I got badly injured at the wrong time, put me out for months, I missed trials and what have you and just.. I never really got another lucky break.

Went into the fire service - I love it! Guess it wasn't my "career passion" in the sense it was what id dreamed of since I was a little boy. But when I sat down and was like "right so what do I want my job to be/to offer" it ticked every single box - I wanted to help people, make a difference, a physical job, a good career path, job security, follow in my granddads footsteps - so I was like this is what I want. And then I was lucky to get in first time cause normally it takes a couple of tries
When I was studying real estate, I was looking for office work and ended up taking an online marketing position even though it wasn't real estate related. Well, I ended up loving it and changing my major to business management so I could study marketing. It's been almost 3 years and I am pursuing something I enjoy. Sometimes experiencing different types of work will put things into perspective. You don't really know what it's like to work in a certain profession until you try it. I think taking internships or volunteering with some of these places would benefit Leigh so she can decide what she enjoys most.
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