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Who Followed Their Career Passions?


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Old 27th July 2014, 6:18 PM   #46
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I'm changing my previous advice after browsing through some of your older threads. Honestly, Leigh, I think you should focus on employability and job prospects. Your "passions" seem to change so frequently that relying on "passion" will only result in you flailing about in circles, as you have been doing for the past four years. Every time you get a new passion you want to change your degree. There is nothing wrong with developing new interests and passions as you go through life (and in fact it is to be expected), but you need to make a plan and stick to it for a degree and career. So, focus on employability. At least that way you can get a job even as your passions change.
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Old 27th July 2014, 6:21 PM   #47
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Interesting.


Well I don't want to pursue a degree I know has no job prospects. I want a full time pay check. In an area I am interested in. I'm really not even fussy about what the job is.
Look up career opportunities with good job prospects that don't require extensive education.
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Old 27th July 2014, 7:59 PM   #48
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I have seen a days work of a podiatrist and a medical imaging specialist.
Hang on, when? You only discovered last week that nuclear medicine was your passion. Before that you were looking at Radiation Therapy?

I have also seen my dentist at work, that doesn't mean I know what it means to be a dentist all week.

I chose my undergraduate degree of television. I saw a documentary on using stereotactic radio surgery to treat inoperable brain tumours and I was 17 so went yep, I want to work with cutting edge technology and machines that go ping.

It took a full decade from when I graduated to when that particular piece of equipment came to Australia. So I didn't hang around. I love the degree but I didn't enjoy the job. It was repetitive and not very challenging. Some patients could also really ruin your day - so I knew it was time to move on.

I always had an interest in law but didn't get the marks at uni to get into a course. So when I started working in what was essentially an administrative role I went back to uni part time and did my Masters in Law with a focus on health law and emerging technology. It was something that was just right place right time as the issues of genetics and the law exploded the year I finished.

I am starting uni again today in a course JUST to get some better skills in an emerging and in demand skill area. I am not that interested in the course and think it will be quite dry but I want to be confident in my technical skills before I start charging clients for it.

If I had my time again I wish I did an arts degree. I really love sociology and would love to research in this area. I am kinda coming across to it a bit, which is why I am wanting to learn more about qualitative methods and emergent design.

I largely follow my interests - and those interests tend to be how can I apply the latest theories to my own area of health. So I have done courses in agile, lean six-sigma, balanced scorecard and other business areas to expand the techniques I use in consulting.

I am always learning something - which is something that is important to me. I am really, really good at being a student!
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Old 27th July 2014, 9:32 PM   #49
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I'm changing my previous advice after browsing through some of your older threads. Honestly, Leigh, I think you should focus on employability and job prospects. Your "passions" seem to change so frequently that relying on "passion" will only result in you flailing about in circles, as you have been doing for the past four years. Every time you get a new passion you want to change your degree. There is nothing wrong with developing new interests and passions as you go through life (and in fact it is to be expected), but you need to make a plan and stick to it for a degree and career. So, focus on employability. At least that way you can get a job even as your passions change.


I have explained multiple times that I have always been more Interested in science based degrees. Since forever.


Hence why I originally started one. I dropped put for reasons other than not being passionate.


Look I am self aware enough to know that I prefer science based degrees and dislike humanities.
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Old 27th July 2014, 9:35 PM   #50
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Look up career opportunities with good job prospects that don't require extensive education.
But I like studying. I am academic. Although I am not that intelligent I do well and feel greatest when I am studying.

I cannot imagine working in a long term career that didn't involve three or more years of study.

I am studying ages care atm and will soon get a job since it is a stable area to gain employment.
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Old 27th July 2014, 9:57 PM   #51
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i think a lot of people suffer from great confusion over a job and a passion. sometimes they end up being one in the same, but generally they do not. you don't have to live a passionless life at work just because your major and career don't match. people who are passionate and hard-working, in general, will find fulfillment in anything they do by working hard and applying themselves. don't focus on finding a passion per se, focus on finding a good job that matches your skills, and pays the bills. it does not have to be the "perfect job," just one that you can see yourself marginally happy in. people underestimate how much joy and passion a job can actually bring. it's the work and the work product that makes one happy. once you feel stable and secure in a job that is even marginally ok, that leads to working towards the passion. you basically just pick *something* that matches your skill set and get going. don't strive for the "perfect" in a major/job
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Old 27th July 2014, 10:03 PM   #52
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Hang on, when? You only discovered last week that nuclear medicine was your passion. Before that you were looking at Radiation Therapy?

They are both areas I have strong inclination towards. Therapy is to do with working with oncology patients and NM is to do with administering radioactive drugs; both involve becoming experts at processing medical images. Both degrees and prospective careers are very appealing to me. Working with disease and illness in some capacity is where I want to work.

Nuclear medicine was degree that most interested me but I am still very positive about both job outcomes; not so positive I will even like or be good at physics and then what would I do? I would stick it out but

At least with podiatry I know I have more affinity with the

I have also seen my dentist at work, that doesn't mean I know what it means to be a dentist all week.

I chose my undergraduate degree of television. I saw a documentary on using stereotactic radio surgery to treat inoperable brain tumours and I was 17 so went yep, I want to work with cutting edge technology and machines that go ping.

I am also really, really wanting to work with cutting edge technology. I suppose it wont reach Australia immediately so that is not the only reason I would enter into such a degree....

It took a full decade from when I graduated to when that particular piece of equipment came to Australia. So I didn't hang around. I love the degree but I didn't enjoy the job. It was repetitive and not very challenging. Some patients could also really ruin your day - so I knew it was time to move on.

While I like challenging study where I get that satisfaction of having moved past difficult concepts, a prefer more repetitive, basic and non challenging work. It seems lazy but once I become an expert at something I would prefer to just do the same thing every day, and rather, read up on latest research and methods to keep up to date.

I always had an interest in law but didn't get the marks at uni to get into a course.

I only got the marks to study law at my particular Uni since the ATAR was 90 and I got just over 92. At a GO8 university I wouldn't have had the marks to get in lol.

Law is my definition of the most boring degree out there. To ME. I hate lots of long essays and written assessments......

I am starting uni again today in a course JUST to get some better skills in an emerging and in demand skill area. I am not that interested in the course and think it will be quite dry but I want to be confident in my technical skills before I start charging clients for it.

You mean a graduate certificate in the area of medical imaging, or health science?

If I had my time again I wish I did an arts degree. I really love sociology and would love to research in this area. I am kinda coming across to it a bit, which is why I am wanting to learn more about qualitative methods and emergent design.

Humanities are the least favourite degrees. I have always wanted to study science in some capacity. I don't mind reading and writing of essays but I felt lacking when I did an entire degree based on writing essays and reports.

I did social science for a semester and loved the topics we discussed and studied but hated doing it as a degree - I found myself yearning for more scientific based learning methods where you read/learn material and use formulas or memorization to get by and do online quizzes.

I largely follow my interests - and those interests tend to be how can I apply the latest theories to my own area of health. So I have done courses in agile, lean six-sigma, balanced scorecard and other business areas to expand the techniques I use in consulting.

I am aiming for a repetitive job that with which I can go and learn various other skills pertaining to the job, on the side. I don't want a job like nursing where you run around with your head cut off in very high stress settings. I would favour repetitive and non challenging any day.

I am always learning something - which is something that is important to me. I am really, really good at being a student!
Well I hope I am as good of a student as you are!
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Old 27th July 2014, 10:06 PM   #53
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i think a lot of people suffer from great confusion over a job and a passion. sometimes they end up being one in the same, but generally they do not. you don't have to live a passionless life at work just because your major and career don't match. people who are passionate and hard-working, in general, will find fulfillment in anything they do by working hard and applying themselves. don't focus on finding a passion per se, focus on finding a good job that matches your skills, and pays the bills. it does not have to be the "perfect job," just one that you can see yourself marginally happy in. people underestimate how much joy and passion a job can actually bring. it's the work and the work product that makes one happy. once you feel stable and secure in a job that is even marginally ok, that leads to working towards the passion. you basically just pick *something* that matches your skill set and get going. don't strive for the "perfect" in a major/job
Good advice.


I at least know that science/medicine/applied health science style of degree is where I am at, in terms of my personal attributes, my level of interest and the resulting careers I have looked into.

I have heard and seen first hand how repetitive some of the jobs I looked into can be and I don't really mind that it is boring and repetitive, I am positive as a person and believe I would find a way to enjoy my work.
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Old 27th July 2014, 11:08 PM   #54
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But I like studying. I am academic. Although I am not that intelligent I do well and feel greatest when I am studying.

I cannot imagine working in a long term career that didn't involve three or more years of study.

I am studying ages care atm and will soon get a job since it is a stable area to gain employment.
You can always do enrichment courses...but if your focus is getting out there and starting your career, you should do that sooner than later. It gets harder to start your career later in life.
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Old 27th July 2014, 11:45 PM   #55
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You can always do enrichment courses...but if your focus is getting out there and starting your career, you should do that sooner than later. It gets harder to start your career later in life.


I am at an age where I am very dedicated towards achieving a professional career. I believe I have tried enough things to have a fair idea of the areas in which I am most interested.

ANY of those degrees I have spoken of in my other threads, I will be thrilled to simply pass them and even more happy to get good grades!

To even just GET the degree, in the area of my interest, and then GET a full time or even part time professional job.... it would mean the world to me.

I am DEAD set dedicated towards simply getting that degree and gaining employment in a professional job. I do not care if the job is less than amusing. As long as it is in a field of interest such as applied health science and medicine, and I can actually use my professional skills to carry out the day to day work.... be is picking at peoples feet at a very simple level or process the same medical images day in and day out.

At this stage, it will do a WORLD of good for me to simply FINISH a degree in the area of health and medical science, and then get a proper job.







But I am not slacking off and I am doing aged care and I am confident that I will soon work in the field before University starts. And once it starts I Can work 15 hours a week for 18 - 20 dollars and earn 300 a week plus save my aus study of 200 a week, PLUS give my parents 75 a week in utilities.




If I cannot get work in my relevant field by the time the three year degree is done and dusted, on well, I can work in aged care and still have the satisfaction and personal pride of having completed a degree; plus years worth of savings from working during college....
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Old 28th July 2014, 12:28 AM   #56
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I have decided that I don't want to blindly follow my absolute passion.

I would rather focus on doing something in an area I am interested in and that has job prospects.

I would be really happy doing a professional job that simply involves diagnosing and/or treating patients, be it medical imaging or podiatry.

I have my spare time to read about all the passions I want.
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Old 28th July 2014, 1:35 AM   #57
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Hi again guys,


I have talked at length to the university again. They said to come along to their open days for my courses. I will be able to talk to the course advisors about employment trends current and future, as well enquire about the physics element and whether I am suited/what path I would have to take regarding tutoring.

Furthermore, consulted with a woman who deals with a few health science degrees. She said that if I don't like podiatry or medical imaging, that if I get distinctions minimum in every course for my first year, I can then switch over to another degree such as physiotherapy or what not (since my back ground is in personal training, perhaps that is something to consider).

Or, I could transfer from podiatry to medical imaging and have many credits transferable.

So after the first year, it is apparently not the end of the world if you get reasonable good grades and want to transfer.

Worst case scenario, if I graduate in an area where I end up hating the work, I can either get another bachelors degree that is short tracked so I would only have to do two years or less, rathe than three or four years, OR; there are a bunch of graduate certificates and 12 - 18 month masters in the health sciences......



She said it is unlikely if I fail that I will have to start from scratch. Especially with aged care and a degree under my belt.
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Old 28th July 2014, 2:26 AM   #58
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Worst case scenario, if I graduate in an area where I end up hating the work, I can either get another bachelors degree that is short tracked so I would only have to do two years or less, rathe than three or four years,
This is correct - it's only one year worth of courses, actually, but it really helps to do the prereqs for the courses even if it's not technically required, so some people do it in two years. I did mine in 1.5, self-studying the prereqs. I think Aussie universities would be quite similar in this regard.
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Old 28th July 2014, 2:55 AM   #59
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But I like studying. I am academic. Although I am not that intelligent I do well and feel greatest when I am studying.

I cannot imagine working in a long term career that didn't involve three or more years of study.

I am studying ages care atm and will soon get a job since it is a stable area to gain employment.
Leigh. You are not being realistic and maybe not even honest You do not have experience with studying. I believe you left high school over a decade ago and have not completed any courses since

You may end up enjoying studying something but so far you have yet to do it.
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Old 28th July 2014, 5:40 AM   #60
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Leigh. You are not being realistic and maybe not even honest You do not have experience with studying. I believe you left high school over a decade ago and have not completed any courses since

You may end up enjoying studying something but so far you have yet to do it.



I got cert four in fitness and did one year of year 12 equivalent and I would not get enough of studying.

I am effective at studying and get what is needed done without wasting time.

I have absolutely no doubt I can do well at college.

I know people who have graduated back from my own high school and primary school. People I believe I am brighter than (got higher scores than them all through primary school as a child) and also the people who got lower high school exam scores than me, many are not doing PHD'S.

I grew up with people of a similar level of intelligence to me who have graduated with masters many moons ago.



Really. Study is the least of my worries. I am extremely efficient and organised when I have studied.
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