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Who Followed Their Career Passions?


Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

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Old 26th July 2014, 10:05 AM   #16
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What if the patient was a toddler? They get diabetes and foot problems too you know.

I don't care if I have to deal with them for appointments, I just don't want to specialise in working with them all day every day. Many women like myself find toddlers unpleasant. Nothing wrong there.
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Old 26th July 2014, 10:41 AM   #17
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I don't care if I have to deal with them for appointments, I just don't want to specialise in working with them all day every day. Many women like myself find toddlers unpleasant. Nothing wrong there.
Yep. Unpleasant and annoying.
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Old 26th July 2014, 11:43 AM   #18
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Like I mentioned in the other thread, I got my grad degree in my late 30s. There weren't a lot of job prospects but I did find a job after graduation. Though I should clarify, the chances of being successful in the specific concentration of the degree I received are next to none. The job I found was in the general industry so I did have interest in it. Plus it was a place I'd interned while in school.

I just feel that searching for a career passion (when it's not obvious) is putting a lot of unnecessary pressure on oneself. Every job provides opportunities and they can grow upon each other.

Good luck!
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Old 26th July 2014, 3:24 PM   #19
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I wanted to be a soccer player in my youth and when that didn't materialise, nothing took its place. I was a straight A student, studied Physics at university, graduated, and now 5 years later (at 25)...I'm a postman!

I just can't get passionate about the thought of any regular career, being a teacher/lawyer/doctor/accountant etc..
Being indoors all the time would kill me.

At the moment I'm getting paid just to walk around in the great outdoors delivering mail, I can listen to my romance language recordings whilst doing so for some intellectual stimulation and to boost my fluency in them.

There is zero stress and no work to take home or worry about. I can work all the hours I like, and if I were to do say a fifty hour week, that would come to 27k a year, but I could earn more if I wanted. Newly qualified teachers start on around 20k, with huge stress, working 12+hour days and taking work home with them.

Sometimes I feel like I'm missing out and should be getting into a career as all my peers are doing - posting their success and grand titles all over facebook.
But should I really when I have such a nice job and no real work related passion?
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Old 26th July 2014, 7:16 PM   #20
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Can't you start down one path and transfer to another if it doesn't interest you? A friend of mine started out in med school and switched to studying design, which is arguably less "practical" but he's much happier. You can't 100% know what's going to engage you until you try it out, right?
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Old 26th July 2014, 8:00 PM   #21
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Can't you start down one path and transfer to another if it doesn't interest you? A friend of mine started out in med school and switched to studying design, which is arguably less "practical" but he's much happier. You can't 100% know what's going to engage you until you try it out, right?
Year one is general so you can get credits transferred.


At my age I can't afford to waste more time.
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Old 26th July 2014, 9:00 PM   #22
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You know this is off topic and im sorry but I just noticed something Leigh and Eternal you two could be sisters if that's your guys rl pics in your avis...
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Old 27th July 2014, 5:15 AM   #23
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Well you live in Holland park. Nice area, must not be doing too poorly.

I get adoration from my partner and other men. I mean, don't all us ladies have another man we know of who is in love with us (yet who we dutifully do not talk to much or see in person?)

I am doing this degree for ME. I want to live an intelligent and worthwhile life.

Going into podiatry, my second choice of degree which I would " do if I won lotto", I can see myself working with diabetics and the ailing/elderly and obese people that have food problems... of all degrees of severity. The patient care aspect I would love.

I just found nuclear medicine a more interesting field but still love the idea of the safer degree (podiatry). It is still something I would like.




I mean, don't we all read about the topics of interest that most enthral us, in our SPARE TIME? Not for our every day jobs?
Leigh, what happened to you wanting to do social work?
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Old 27th July 2014, 5:52 AM   #24
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Leigh, what happened to you wanting to do social work?



Oh, I always wanted to do a medical science style of degree, originally to be a nutritionist, but then I freaked out because I hadn't done math or physics for over ten years. I didn't even give it a go because I assumed I would fail.

I thought I would like social work because it had no math and I wanted to help people and I could avoid math. While I enjoyed reading about social issues, it turns out I cannot stand humanities based degrees as I have always been MUCH more science orientated. I would much rather work out problems all day than writing a huge essay on the same topic.

I am now at the stage where I am willing to do what it takes in order to do a science/health science/medical based degree I am actually excited about and therefore willing to battle through the hard times/the boring elements of the degree/the bad points of the actual job. I find that if you are driven by a certain area of study and you like what you job does on a fundamental level, you don't get TOO perturbed by hard work, or boring and monotonous parts of your daily job....

I am 100% sure I will be happier in a science/health/medical based degree and resulting profession than I would be in any humanities based degree/career.

It has just been a matter of me researching various degrees that interest me and ensuring there are REAL job prospects.
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Old 27th July 2014, 6:43 AM   #25
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I'd advocate a balance. Don't go purely based on salary - salary fluctuates with time and location. But unless you have a substantial trust fund that you can live on for the rest of your life (do you?), you do need to give employability SOME thought IMO. Especially as, as ES says, you're not even 100% sure what you'd really want and keep changing your mind. If you had believed that you had been cut out for some career path for years, then I would've told you to follow your dreams.
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Old 27th July 2014, 7:24 AM   #26
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I'd advocate a balance. Don't go purely based on salary - salary fluctuates with time and location. But unless you have a substantial trust fund that you can live on for the rest of your life (do you?), you do need to give employability SOME thought IMO. Especially as, as ES says, you're not even 100% sure what you'd really want and keep changing your mind. If you had believed that you had been cut out for some career path for years, then I would've told you to follow your dreams.

I have a flat and my parents support me but I will worked in aged care soon as I am quickly getting through the certificate and there is plenty of work available.

So I will be paying utilities of about 75 a week once I work again, and that is it. I don't have pressure to have to "work to live" like most people of my age. Hence I can afford to study full time and only choose to work say, two five hour shifts per week in aged care. Or I don't have to work at all, I just want to. I think I am in a good place to begin a bachelors degree. I don't have financial pressure and I can 100% focus on the degree at hand.

I have always "known" I am more into chemistry and life sciences, I have always been motivated to study hard enough to do well in these areas. I am also the most "interested" in anything scientific. I like global issues but who doesn't follow them? I don't want to make a career out of it in say, foreign relations or anything. The month I was in my food science degree I was getting perfect marks and was thrilled with the course work. It is just as soon as I found out math was a compulsory course, I quit. I assumed I .."didn't have what it takes" to learn math as a mature adult, and start from scratch.

With humanities based degrees something was missing. I know anything without at least 50% science is not for me.





Given what I know, I am most passionate about being able to work with anything to do with diseases/diagnosing them in any capacity/ and/or treating disease. I know I don't want to go into research as a straight science degree is too broad and results in dire employment prospects. I have seen it happen 1000 times......

Therefore, I am definitely certain that the optimal area for me to study in and gain employment in a hopefully similar field to that of my degree, is" any APPLIED science degrees with a SPEFIFIC job outcome. The applied science degrees that focus on something SPECFIC and actually have clinical PLACEMENT.

I happen to live near a local uni which has a great track record with their student placements..... in both medical imaging degrees and podiatry dergees I REALLY love how students get 1000 plus hours of work in their field.

Given that I have no idea if I like or am even good at physics or math since I never gave myself that chance to develop those skills, I think a degree like podiatry is ideal for me. Medical Imaging degrees are physics HEAVY which is a bad idea for me since I have no idea if I have an inclination towards physics.

My local campus has the degree, they have 1000 hours of placement, it is ALL medical/anatomy/physiology/biomechanical based. Students often walk into jobs and although the job market can change, I LOVE that podiatry is a small industry, there are not a great deal of us floating about and I do believe that, pit of all careers, we have reasonable prospects in the future of finding work.



What I most like is that in podiatry, you get to use your technical expertise to actually diagnose and treat people. It is one on one patient care, you work by yourself mostly, and you can go on to open your own practice after you have gained experience and want to move up a level.



I do think I have at least a fair idea of the academic areas of pursuit that I have a good inclination and aptitude towards, that would be challenging but doable; both the degree and career aspects.
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Old 27th July 2014, 7:37 AM   #27
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Balance.

To me balance is:

- following your true academic interests
- ensuring it is not out of your grasp and being honest with yourself about what your true limits are in terms of what course work you can actually pass
- ensuring that there are reasonable employment prospects and forecasts and use common sense; for instance, there will always be sick people, overweight people, people with diabetes and people who get cancer and need their medical images dealt with by medical imaging professionals.

As I said, the degrees I narrowed it down to ALL start on similar starting salaries: medical imaging jobs AND podiatry and also the oral health therapy degree that is at my local campus and is also a medical style of degree.
I can definitely seeing myself in each career only, I have no idea if I like or am good at physics and therefore medical imaging shouldn't even be something I consider until I get some basic physics 101 lessons via a tutor.
I am factoring in, first and foremost, is my strongest areas of interest. Diagnosing and/or treating patients or at least working with disease in some capacity.

I am much more certain I can not only pass but get high distinctions in anatomy, physiology and cell biology. Podiatry is therefore a degree in which I feel secure in actually passing and excelling in, one would hope.

I have NO idea if I would flop or fly through a medical imaging style of degree.






I quiet honestly would just enjoy becoming a professional at anything pertaining to disease diagnosis and/or treatment.

If the reasonable pay was not there I would still do that over humanity based professions; even if teachers or social workers got the big dollars I would still MUCH rather work as a low paid medical/health care provider. I guess you could say that I WOULD still go down the medical imaging OR podiatry route even if they were low paid, simply because it beats the heck out of working in the humanities to me, personally. It is still important to factor in employment prospects but they are not the be all or end all, as long as I feel there is a reasonable chance I can actually SECURE employment.
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Old 27th July 2014, 10:09 AM   #28
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To me balance is:

- following your true academic interests
- ensuring it is not out of your grasp and being honest with yourself about what your true limits are in terms of what course work you can actually pass
- ensuring that there are reasonable employment prospects and forecasts and use common sense; for instance, there will always be sick people, overweight people, people with diabetes and people who get cancer and need their medical images dealt with by medical imaging professionals.
Regarding the bolded points... I have two degrees (yes, unfortunately, I made the wrong choice for my first). IMO, whether or not you can pass or tolerate or enjoy the coursework of your degree is not anywhere near as important as whether or not you can tolerate and enjoy the actual relevant WORK that you'd do after your degree. With enough effort and time spent, most people can technically pass most degrees, even if they scrape through and fail a few times. But working in a career for years... that's much harder to cope with and should be your primary consideration.

That is why shadowing is so important. If my 18-yo self had actually had thought about shadowing someone at work for a week, I would not have chosen the degree that I did at first (even though I graduated with a pretty good GPA). Fortunately I was able to salvage some of it via a fast-track second degree for graduates, but it wasn't an ideal pathway by any means. So, learn from my mistakes.
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Old 27th July 2014, 10:19 AM   #29
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I started out in engineering. At the two year mark, decided I didn't want to transfer. So I talked to my counselor about what degree I could pick up staying where I was, and it turned out I was 100% on track with chemistry.

So, my first degree was somewhat by default. I used that degree in industry for thirteen years, banking some good money in the process. But, there wasn't anything passionate about it. Meanwhile, my dog was very sick with a pretty rare and exotic illness. I spent a lot of time at the library reading about it, and got interested in medicine.


Went back to school for nursing at 33; graduated at 35 (all my science stuff transferred, even after that length of time. What didn't, I Klepped out of).


Been doing that for another thirteen years. My heavy science background equipped me to advance to places that just an RN wouldn't. Was thinking about going back to school one more time, but opted to focus on planning my retirement instead. Acquired second husband in the process, and have the mental and emotional support I didn't have the first time around.
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Old 27th July 2014, 10:28 AM   #30
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I have seen a days work of a podiatrist and a medical imaging specialist.

The jobs both look like something I could do long term.

May I ask, what made you want to do your first degree? And could you easily get a job or, did you just not like the job?

Did you have any placements as a student? Both degrees I'm interested in have 1000 plus hours work placement.

I don't think I will suddenly walk into either hypothetical job from either degree and suddenly realise that " I hate the job".
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