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Old 14th July 2014, 8:30 AM   #61
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In terms of the degree, I have a feeling it with be in the health field with an element of helping other people but not with as poor of a career earning potential as social work or working in community development.

I have an overwhelming sense that doing an easy degree will have repercussions; you get what you pay for in life. A super easy degree that anyone could pass = a lower paying job and less earning potential UNLESS you do a masters.

I don't want to do a law degree which I have the marks to get into, however; I could handle a health science degree that has SOME science but is not hard core. Not the full on, hardest science out there by any stretch, but still demanding enough to make it harder than bare essay writing degrees. Doing a less demanding and much cheaper diploma this year will enable me to have time to hire a tutor, and also pay for one due to my part time income! I have the remainder of this year and some of next year to prepare for 2015, semester one, starting early March.

I started a food science degree and LOVED IT besides the math, as I couldn't even remember basic math.

They only made you do math for 6 months. And NOT at a calculus level. I just had not done math for over 15 years, I needed to have probably been getting a tutor for a year or 6 months if I did two tutoring sessions for two hours each per week.

Whichever degree I get into, lets face it. If it is going to be a worthwhile degree with more prospects, it is likely doing to be a little more full on than social science or social work.








Here's hoping that the remainder of this year is sufficient time for me to get he tutoring I need for the degree ahead.

It will either be a nursing, health science or food science degree.

All are three years.

I wasn't ready for it the first time I did it, but with a math and science tutor I am sure I will manage. After all, one subject everyone else found very hard and had a 70% fail rate, I passed with flying colours.

I got a math tutor for my food science degree but only after the degree started, when I badly needed it before hand.

You don't use math in a health science degree, it is mostly science from what I can recall, perhaps I could do that?








The career guide will know best. Based on my past, my aptitude for science versus essay writing and whatever degree is in the biggest area of growth career wise.......


I have the rest of this year to settle down and focus on the bachelors. Earn some money......etc.
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Old 14th July 2014, 8:41 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ufo8mycat View Post
Hopefully therapy will give you some clarity.

Things can change rather quickly and I am not too sure on the focus on being a "professional". If you are good at maths and science then taking a bridging course should bring you up to speed pretty quickly. If you did well in these subjects in school there isn't any reason why you wouldn't do well at uni. Not a huge amount has changed.

I was never "good" and I hate physics and will not do a degree which contains hard math or physics. However, I enjoyed chemistry and was naturally adept at memorizing ANYTHING biology. Average at math, will only do soft math which health science degrees contain mostly (hard math is left for engineering and accounting).

Personally I think you should always study what interest you rather than being driven but the current job market as it can change very quickly.

Science (bio and earth science are my favourites) and helping people, in short. They are my passions academically.

Nursing and health science degrees can amount to helping people. Plus I am about to start an aged care diploma this year so I can get my fix of helping people in a full on manner via the aged care work. Or volunteering.

I could always volunteer and get my fix of community service I feel a duty to give and feel the most proud of in terms of my personal fulfilment, and then have a PAID CAREER based in the sciences and health sectors......

I made the mistake of pursuing an honours degree in Social Work, when I could have done a better paid field and just volunteered as a means of helping people.

Aged care is an expanding industry - but mostly at the coal face rather than in the "professional" level roles.

It is considered a professional job here; you learn skills that are valuable and of demand. A professional career is on in which skills are learnt to a certain extent.

My background is health - I have an applied science degree, worked clinically then went into research. I am now a consultant in the private sector. I have had so many different roles, all loosely linked to health and social services and each has taught me something new.

Was is science focused or did they force hard math on you? I am only willing to learn basic math, my focus is on chemistry and biology. With only the basic math to get me by.

There are benefits to being flexible and keeping and open mind. Your ideal job my yet to be invented. I really disliked my graduate area, there were parts of it that were not suited to my personality but it didn't become apparent until I was on clinical practice.

So consider that it is that you don't like about working with toddlers (their unpredictability, unable to communicate, inflexibility, whatever it was that rubbed you the wrong way) and write that down.

Those things you identify are what you need to avoid in a job - not necessarily toddlers.
Honestly I have friends of all ages who have been annoying, including my great aunt who turned batty and demented before she passed; it NEVER Phased me!

I have always disliked toddlers in general. Everyone thinks they are little angels while I always though they were not cute at all.

I dislike them for the strain they put on your life I guess hence why I don't want kids.

Plenty of things about toddlers I can absolutely tolerate in other people or settings.
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Old 14th July 2014, 8:58 AM   #63
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I was not aware that there is an easy, `degree`, something that is easy for one is hard for another. Would you consider a Political science degree easy? I would consider a degree in nursing hard.

A degree is a discipline that shows an employer you can actually stick at something longer than 5 minutes.

My peer group all studied different things at university, some of us did further degrees. Some did not, some became Doctors, lawyers, Healthcare professionals, Teachers, Scientists, Journalistsí, Coach, drivers, Warehouse managers, Started their own businesses, Public service announcers at Charing Cross station. Hell some even went in to the Fashion industry.

Some went from 3 years of teaching to high level management positions in multinationals.

Some went from high level corporate managers to middle earning teachers.


Some went from driving the coach to owning a fleet of coaches.

Some disappeared in haze of narcotics and good times in Goa, only to return and become estate agents so they could do it all again.

I think your focus should not be on constantly money. Choose something you will enjoy and stick at it. Put the work in. Get your head down and what you want will come.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Leigh 87 View Post
In terms of the degree, I have a feeling it with be in the health field with an element of helping other people but not with as poor of a career earning potential as social work or working in community development.

I have an overwhelming sense that doing an easy degree will have repercussions; you get what you pay for in life. A super easy degree that anyone could pass = a lower paying job and less earning potential UNLESS you do a masters.

I don't want to do a law degree which I have the marks to get into, however; I could handle a health science degree that has SOME science but is not hard core. Not the full on, hardest science out there by any stretch, but still demanding enough to make it harder than bare essay writing degrees. Doing a less demanding and much cheaper diploma this year will enable me to have time to hire a tutor, and also pay for one due to my part time income! I have the remainder of this year and some of next year to prepare for 2015, semester one, starting early March.

I started a food science degree and LOVED IT besides the math, as I couldn't even remember basic math.

They only made you do math for 6 months. And NOT at a calculus level. I just had not done math for over 15 years, I needed to have probably been getting a tutor for a year or 6 months if I did two tutoring sessions for two hours each per week.

Whichever degree I get into, lets face it. If it is going to be a worthwhile degree with more prospects, it is likely doing to be a little more full on than social science or social work.








Here's hoping that the remainder of this year is sufficient time for me to get he tutoring I need for the degree ahead.

It will either be a nursing, health science or food science degree.

All are three years.

I wasn't ready for it the first time I did it, but with a math and science tutor I am sure I will manage. After all, one subject everyone else found very hard and had a 70% fail rate, I passed with flying colours.

I got a math tutor for my food science degree but only after the degree started, when I badly needed it before hand.

You don't use math in a health science degree, it is mostly science from what I can recall, perhaps I could do that?








The career guide will know best. Based on my past, my aptitude for science versus essay writing and whatever degree is in the biggest area of growth career wise.......


I have the rest of this year to settle down and focus on the bachelors. Earn some money......etc.
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Old 14th July 2014, 10:01 AM   #64
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I am considering applying to get into a law degree. The law degree IS NOT JUST law - it is ALWAYS a double degree.

So I could do social science majoring in welfare/ and a law degree in the span of four years.

I just figured, I tried to hard in high school and got 92% and law is only 90 to get considered for.....I mean, if other people had the marks, surely they would feel privileged to get entrance granted into a law degree? Insofar as law is concerned, I enjoy earth science/environmental science and welfare and human rights so surely a law degree would be transient into an area of interest to me? Where there is passion there is more of a fire, yes?

Either that or I will just do a health related field and have more time to work since I will have more of a life than I would doing the law degree. I am very fired up and adamant that I want to make up for lost time career wise, HOWEVER, the health related fields seem to be a much more in demand job market .




I can either do an aged care diploma between now and college semester one next year, get degree in the area of health science which is one of the most growing and in demand industries, and work as an aged carer part time whilst studying full time.



OR


DO the law double degree and have NO LIFE or chance to work (since I do not have to work and get gov study benefits that more than support me since I live at home!)









I will ask the career guidance counsellor. It is all about what will MOST LIKELY land me a job and a secure career path (of course if I work hard)
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Old 14th July 2014, 10:13 AM   #65
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Leigh...

I think you should make a proper list (or mind map) of the options you are considering. Do something like:

Option 1: Social science degree
Pros: etc etc
Cons: etc etc

Option 2: Law degree

And so on and so forth. When you get new 'epiphanies', go back to the list and modify/add accordingly. This way you will consolidate your decision-making in one place, instead of having your thoughts unravel unchecked.

I get that people have their own ways of making decisions, but your method isn't working - you're all over the place and not only do you change your mind wildly every few weeks, you have been doing so for the past several years. This will help you impose some structure on your thoughts and hopefully help you finally decide on and stick to something.
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Old 14th July 2014, 10:45 AM   #66
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People are trying to be kind and patient on here from what ive seen Leigh and you have gotten some sound advice. I agree with others the counseling is a good way to go keep that up. Fair enough you don't like little kids not every one is cut out for them. But like others said aged elderly can be just as hard to deal with something to really consider..
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Old 14th July 2014, 10:54 AM   #67
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I do not want to do a social work degree. Ever.

Social work or Social science (majoring in welfare) or arts/community development

CONS: very limited chance to ever increase your earning potential UNLESS you go on and do a masters in something like HR or business, and end up in management within a non for profit organisation or management in any company that involves human services...... I should imagine.

Low paid.

PROS: helping people. many areas of interest to me. No hard science or math. If you work hard you pass without having to entrench formulas or hard science types of setbacks...



Nursing

PROS: one of the degrees that lands you a job fairly easily IF you work hard and do volunteer experience, in say aged care or as a phone crisis counsellor

I could work part time in aged care as I studied and earn income before graduating

CONS: emotionally taxing and night shifts may be the only shifts on offer/must learn to adapt your circadian rhythm

WOULD NEED A LOT OF MATH TUTORING and I would get chemistry tutoring because chemistry is challenging

Biology is the only subject I would get through scott free.


Law, double degree

PROS:

There are many areas of law and you can pick what interests you

You can help people

You do a double degree and therefore a degree like social science that would be of interest to me than pure law based subjects

Having two degrees rolled into one gives you more career prospects; do you want to be a lawyer OR work in welfare with your social science degree taking precedence?

High earning potential if you work hard and want to go further career wise

Most jobs are at least MEDIUM income and not low paid jobs, even though many law grads do not turn out to be high flying lawyers, a great deal of them tend to end up in OKAY paying jobs

I have heard law offers a variety of career paths beyond just being a lawyer

CONS: no life, much to read, no days off, no slacking no time for part time work unless you have a high IQ and NEED to work to survive
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Old 14th July 2014, 10:59 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by TigerLilly78 View Post
People are trying to be kind and patient on here from what ive seen Leigh and you have gotten some sound advice. I agree with others the counseling is a good way to go keep that up. Fair enough you don't like little kids not every one is cut out for them. But like others said aged elderly can be just as hard to deal with something to really consider..



I hate toddlers because there is just something about them IN GENERAL I dislike immensely.

However, I am HIGHLY tolerant of abusive and annoying people of all ages BESIDES toddlers.

When I was ten I helped look after a severely disabled girl who absolutely loved me. She constantly asked where I was.

Since I was 10 I was unsure and uncomfortable initially but after years of spending time with her, I look after her when she threw tantrums, crapped her pants, screamed and didn't make sense....

I spent HOURS pretending to slam into a wall so she would laugh.





I am a lot more compassionate than most people, I have always had a lot of time to give to listening and tolerating challenges people throw at me.








I am the friend who is there to listen at 3am and miss sleep if I have a friend in need, even if it is a person I have not known for long and who isn't even a friend.



I honestly give a great deal more though and energy into helping people around me, I know many people in the aged care profession and I do NOT think my hatred of toddlers has ANTYHING to do with my ability to care for the aged, I don't CARE If an old person throws a tantrum it is JUST TODDLERS who I cannot stand doing those things.
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Old 14th July 2014, 11:11 AM   #69
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Nursing

- aged care and health are the number one growing industries with one of the highest post degree employment rates in Australia

- I am actually passionate about sciences that pertain to biology and chemistry. I hate hard math and physics though, neither of which is in nursing (basic math only)

- of all the health careers, nursing is my only fit; science degrees are generally considered useless UNLESS you become a doctor, to a masters in science and become quiet the expert; you have to do further study in science based degrees to ever earn a decent salary.

- I could do an aged care certificate this year, get a job in my area since it is THE most growing industry and ONE of the most likely professions to land you a job

- the aged care work could be something I do part time whilst nursing; prospective employers may look more favourably upon me, a woman who works as a carer to elderly, when they are looking for nurses

- whilst demanding, nursing isn't as time consuming as say, law, and would allow me to work part time

- I start phone crisis counselling volunteer work soon. This has a lot to do with mental health problems since these are the top people who call in and need assistance in a crisis

- it is a challenging degree, I would need MATH TUTORING, but the math is not ongoing as a subject and you only do pure math for 6 months to one year of the entire degree.

- it has a high rate of employment after graduating

- it is hard but the science isn't heading towards PHD level you can earn a salary without having to become an expert, as is the case with science based degrees in Australia where you need to do masters and PHD'S in order to get ANYWHERE with a science based degree




Law double degree

- you need a 90% entrance score and I got 92, so why not make something of myself, since many people want to aim high for themselves and I have the chance?

- I would do social sciences as my double degree and major in welfare which I am about to start relevant volunteer work in (phone crisis counselling)

- I wouldn't be able to work in aged care during the degree. My only experience would be in phone crisis counselling, I would have prior work experience as a personal trainer with a great reference in it and that is about it.

- I would need to bust my ass looking for experience, such as working in a legal office in admin at the front desk. I seem to have no luck of getting basic jobs so I am iffy about getting people to give me work experience in the field....

- I am not sure what law entails or if I am passionate about it in the way I am with nursing and sciences.....
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Old 14th July 2014, 11:13 AM   #70
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I do not want to do a social work degree. Ever.
Is this not the degree that you have been posting about feeling "passion" for for then past several months?

Regarding your hatred of toddlers:

Of course you are entitled to feel exactly how you feel about anything. The fact that you can go on and on for many pages about intense hatred for toddlers is a big red flag, though.

Can you see that?
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Old 14th July 2014, 11:16 AM   #71
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It seems to be that:

-medicine
-law
-accounting
-engineering
- pharmacy

Are the most solid "sounding" degrees.

Although as I said, the health sector is booming and expanding but nursing is the only thing I could really excel at, since frankly I cannot see myself becoming a scientist?

Things like: podiatry, biomedical science (contains math and physics), and the like are under the "health" umbrella, many of which I would likely have to do hard math for.

With Law, you really have to be a go getter and love the legal system, I am not sure if there are many other outlets to learn about so the legal elements of the degree do not become too dry......






Nursing or a law double degree seem to be the most fitting degrees so far career wise in terms of prospects and my passions. I am interested in a lot of different subjects, and law apparently covers a whole host of issues in various areas?

I do like writing a lot?

I enjoy science but not HARDCORE< rocket science crap.







Any ideas guys? I am seeing an expert but just thought I would ask.
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Old 14th July 2014, 11:18 AM   #72
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Originally Posted by Glinda.Good View Post
Is this not the degree that you have been posting about feeling "passion" for for then past several months?

Regarding your hatred of toddlers:

Of course you are entitled to feel exactly how you feel about anything. The fact that you can go on and on for many pages about intense hatred for toddlers is a big red flag, though.

Can you see that?

Of course I enjoy social work but I do not want to be stuck on 40K a year for life with no prospects of progressing unless I do a masters and/or diploma.

And no to your question, because frankly I think I am far more kind and compassionate and generous than most people.

Plenty of very altruistic people who are way more giving than you probably hate toddlers too.

I don't see why every "nice" person is supposed to think toddlers are cute little angels
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Old 14th July 2014, 11:21 AM   #73
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I should probably clarify: I don't hate ALL toddlers that much.

I hated the family I lived with, they were stingy, tight ass and not ethical in their practices. I think they are bad people with low morals. They talk down to others which I hate in people.

I loved a few toddlers I cared for.

I dislike a lot of toddlers that misbehave and scream and shout regularly; I am not their mum so why would I think it is cute or non offensive?

My main point about babies and toddlers is: what is so cute about them? I just don't find babies and toddlers cute unless I KNOW the toddler. Babies = never cute. Toddlers = cute sometimes if I KNOW their families and the toddlers are not brats.



My capacity to care for other members of my community has no bearing on me hating SOME toddlers and not thinking the majority are so cute.
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Old 14th July 2014, 11:41 AM   #74
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Nurses in Sydney 2012 - 2013:

Registered nurse/aged care = 30 - 35 dollars per hour

Registered nurse in the state of NSW where I reside starts from: 52K up to 75K



Since the pay doesn't ever sky rocket as a nurse, one day I may want a career chance; apparently some nurses including one I met change career paths after 20 years or so.....

Counselling is a passion of mine, namely relationship LOL, so I can see myself in nursing and aged care, and then doing a basic and cheap diploma course to get me on a different career path if need be.
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Old 14th July 2014, 11:41 AM   #75
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Didn't you already go through this decision process back when you initially chose to pursue the social work degree? I'm really confused about why you are now rehashing all of this same ground.

What has changed? You've talked endlessly about how much you wanted to go into social work and how great of a fit it was for you...and now you don't want to do it anymore? Why not?

It's not too late to get whatever degree you want to get and to pursue whatever career you want to pursue...but you have to make a decision, make a plan, and stick with it. If a career counselor will help you do that, great. You really just seem to be kicking the can down the road, though. You make a decision, do that for awhile, then change your mind, then lather, rinse, and repeat. Changing your mind again and again is only going to result in you being even further behind.
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