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Working full time with a second job plus studying full time. Help!


Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

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Old 24th May 2014, 12:50 PM   #31
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I'm a nurse. I graduated at 22 with no debt. I bought my first home at 24, and paid it off in ten years. I'm now on my third, with some land; and I have done the traveling I wanted to do. I'm set to retire in three years.

But, you know, carry on ranting because of what a couple of people have told you.
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Old 24th May 2014, 1:03 PM   #32
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I'm a nurse. I graduated at 22 with no debt. I bought my first home at 24, and paid it off in ten years. I'm now on my third, with some land; and I have done the traveling I wanted to do. I'm set to retire in three years.

But, you know, carry on ranting because of what a couple of people have told you.

Nursing would have been a good career option. For me personally speaking. It must be rewarding.

I was going to go into nursing but hadn't done math in over 15 years and wasn't sure how to go about learning calculus and hard stuff/affording a tutor. Didn't think I could afford a tutor Yet what do you know, full time work is around the corner so I could probably.

You gradated when? At what age. My mate is nearly 22 and is set to graduate in a few weeks. She went to college fresh out of high school with out the typical Aussie "gap year" of overseas travel.

I had just noticed that a lot LESS Americans travelled overseas besides older couples who had obviously worked many years and could now afford it?

The Americans I did meet were all in prestigious types of fields, where as a LOT of Aussie students who work retail/waitress jobs are overseas.

I have had a few Americans tell me that it is very hard to get savings with student loans pending....

There are obviously exceptions?
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Old 24th May 2014, 1:08 PM   #33
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I definitely do think you should do what you're passionate about and that if you are passionate enough and focused enough, you will succeed. That said, I don't know anyone with a social work degree who ended up doing social work. The reason is this. There is a great need for these social workers, but they are paid by municipalities, cities, counties, etc. and as most of us know, due to budget constraints (the voters not wanting tax hikes), they can't afford to hire nearly as many as needed. You may find some position with a women's shelter or something similar, but then those folks mainly use volunteers. But like I said, always follow your dream because your passion and focus will eventually prevail. I certainly wouldn't advise anyone not passionate about it to pursue that field, though.

One thing I've learned from the work I do is that colleges will tell just about everyone there's jobs for every major. Why? Because they're in business to make money and attract students. I work peripherally in legal support and see lawsuits about it frequently. So don't take too seriously the pumping up you get from the career counselors on the payroll of a school. A better phone call would be one to people who hire to ask what they recommend.
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Old 24th May 2014, 1:09 PM   #34
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I'm a nurse. I graduated at 22 with no debt. I bought my first home at 24, and paid it off in ten years. I'm now on my third, with some land; and I have done the traveling I wanted to do. I'm set to retire in three years.

But, you know, carry on ranting because of what a couple of people have told you.
And tuition has increased several times over while wages have stagnated since you did all that. I can count on one hand the number of people my age who graduated debt free, and the number of people I know who bought a home by 24 is exactly 1. He worked on Wall Street straight out of a prestigious school his parents paid for. It's not like it was back then. Leigh's perceptions are a bit exaggerated and irrelevant to the topic at hand, but there's truth to what she believes. More than a lot of Americans would like to admit.

Leigh, be careful not to overdo it. I almost killed myself commuting to school full time while working evening shifts even part time. It's harder than it seems, especially if you have demanding coursework.
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Old 24th May 2014, 1:14 PM   #35
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^it wouldn't let me edit - I would add that the better way is to ask the career counselor for what types of places hire but then phone directly those employers and speak to their HR department and ask how frequently they hire and what the pay range is for someone fresh out of school. They may not reveal that last part, but you can ask. You can also ask them where they source their hires from and whether they can guide you to any other industry who uses social workers.
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Old 24th May 2014, 2:21 PM   #36
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Not to be too OT, but I am very happy to live in Australia. I have seriously considered moving to US and looking for job there but unfortunately, my salary would be less than a half of what I earn here. I am not sure how people over there can bear doing the hard yards of a PhD and then earn 40K as a postdoc. Awful. I know the living expenses are lower there but they are certainly not less than a half lower. Add to that the health care system (which hopefully Abbott doesn't ruin ) and yeah, Australia is
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Old 24th May 2014, 3:00 PM   #37
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I do pity students over there.

I pat myself on the back because I was a high school drop out and yet I went back to school as a mature adult and did really well and got accepted into prestigious degrees like law/sciences degrees yet chose to follow my passion despite the much lower.... salary outcome. I think any high school drop out like myself who was utterly miserable should feel proud of themselves for turning their lives around.

The reason I hate the US system so much is because it is not worth going to college in the USA unless you do a degree that amounts to a high salary. The student debt is astonishingly high! Without a well paid job soon after graduating you are SCREWED, sorry.

As a social work masters students in two years time, the student loan debt in the USA wouldn't warrant the salary for a social worker. You will be as worse off being a waitress your entire life, SANS student loan debt... Because the debt is smaller and easier to pay off here in AUS, you can graduate, normally get a job in your field unless you pick a useless degree, and then look forward to saving for things in the near future.

I have been told by Americans that a 40K student debt in a social science degree will get you a job totally unrelated to your major that you don't get paid enough to live on unless you have a room mate/room mates. And forget about ever travelling overseas. When travelling, I only EVER saw Americans that had prestigious jobs. I NEVER once met an American that was a nurse, social worker... oh I met ONE teacher who travelled a lot but she gets a higher salary as she worked in private schools and was childless and got help....

Where as broke Aussie students travel cos they work during college, live at home and save like crazy! SO MANY young aussies travel compared to young Americans because so many of them are stuck in student debt that they just cannot even THINK about travel, not even for years after they graduate!

I am well travelled and I have had Americans tell me this first hand!

My mate got a social science degree and is about to land a 40K job and save to travel overseas. And she didn't have to do hard math or anything remotely difficult during her degree??? Yet she gets to save for overseas travel? This is typical of our fantastic quality of life in Aussie land.

I just feel like in America you have to work a lot harder for a lot less fun.
All I have read on here is that you mostly do correspondence college courses, and have not worked much.

Being 'well traveled' is not an accomplishment.

Once you have worked job(s) and are able to support yourself, you will have something to go on about - rather than continuing to talk about what you want to do.
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Old 24th May 2014, 3:54 PM   #38
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I've always worked while in school. In my last 2 years, I was working close to 30 hours a week while in school full time. It also helped that my classes were online so I could work on homework nights and weekends. It's doable.
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Old 25th May 2014, 2:18 AM   #39
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I know I will go on to do a masters in something.

It may not be social work. It will depend on what my extensive research that I will conduct once I graduate with my bachelor's, finds.

There may be a better grad school option in 2.5 years that will allow me to still find purpose and meaning but that isn't social work.

It's great that I want to help people but I do need to ensure I pick an area of study that ... will actually land me a job!

Right now I'm just doing an arts/community development degree so i at leasthave that ooption of working with the disadvantaged on a small scale in non for profit type places.

If I can't find any meaningful work I will just do a masters in something unrelated. That makes sense based on the current job market...

I am open to changing my career trajectory since, we'll, it's just not smart to go into grad school and get a masters that isn't likely to amount to anything.

I don't want to get rich but I want a job that will at least pay the bills.

I enjoy a broad range of things so I am sure I will find something I enjoy out of any job.
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Old 25th May 2014, 2:24 AM   #40
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And tuition has increased several times over while wages have stagnated since you did all that. I can count on one hand the number of people my age who graduated debt free, and the number of people I know who bought a home by 24 is exactly 1. He worked on Wall Street straight out of a prestigious school his parents paid for. It's not like it was back then. Leigh's perceptions are a bit exaggerated and irrelevant to the topic at hand, but there's truth to what she believes. More than a lot of Americans would like to admit.

Leigh, be careful not to overdo it. I almost killed myself commuting to school full time while working evening shifts even part time. It's harder than it seems, especially if you have demanding coursework.


How are new graduates supposed to make ends meat with 40k student debt looming over their shoulders, when rent is about 1000 a month, debt is about 1000 per month and they are only earning enough money to pay for rent and the student debt?

Your college system is totally ridiculous and only thenbest paid degree based jobs will give students a chance in life.... the majority of new grads will live in near poverty.

I am not exaggerating I have been told the figures.... what they earn a month, what the loan repayment scheme is per month. ....

Many live with parents and still cannot afford the dept repayment on their salary.

It is such a joke. Students shouldn't have to make such huge repayments and they should be earning a more secure income before being asked to pay a cent off.




Australia is a much...much better country to live in. The USA is very cruel to its students.....
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Old 25th May 2014, 8:26 AM   #41
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Honestly? I think that if you really want this, you should just go and try it, and analyze less before the fact. Worst come to worst you end up needing to quit something, and learn something from the experience. Still way better than if you'd backed out before trying.
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Old 25th May 2014, 9:10 AM   #42
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All I have read on here is that you mostly do correspondence college courses, and have not worked much.

Being 'well traveled' is not an accomplishment.

Once you have worked job(s) and are able to support yourself, you will have something to go on about - rather than continuing to talk about what you want to do.


Well I ... tend to look less favourably upon people who can afford to travel but prefer to stay in their own country year after year.... unless they are actively helping rescue animals, and using their money elsewhere.

I am too much in love with seeing other countries to be able to ever have much common ground with a person who has no desire to travel.

And I think travel IS an accomplishment. It opens your mind and makes you a more interesting person.
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Old 25th May 2014, 9:12 AM   #43
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Honestly? I think that if you really want this, you should just go and try it, and analyze less before the fact. Worst come to worst you end up needing to quit something, and learn something from the experience. Still way better than if you'd backed out before trying.


I will be so stoked if the nanny situation works out well and I graduate within 3 years.

Anything else is a real bonus. I don't mind if I have to take longer to do the additional diploma which is designed to take a year. I will pay the 150 concession student fee to re enrol each year I take to do the diploma in youth work.

The second job is just a bonus, a way to earn more but my studies and the live in nanny position come first.
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Old 25th May 2014, 9:33 AM   #44
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Well I ... tend to look less favourably upon people who can afford to travel but prefer to stay in their own country year after year.... unless they are actively helping rescue animals, and using their money elsewhere.

I am too much in love with seeing other countries to be able to ever have much common ground with a person who has no desire to travel.

And I think travel IS an accomplishment. It opens your mind and makes you a more interesting person.
Everyone has their priorities, or ways in which they wish to spend their earnings.

Imo, 'travel' is as much an accomplishment as eating deserts.
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Old 25th May 2014, 1:48 PM   #45
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Everyone has their priorities, or ways in which they wish to spend their earnings.

Imo, 'travel' is as much an accomplishment as eating deserts.


Anyone with an average paying job can travel overseas far away once in their lifetime. Like a lot more.

Yet people who don't opt to leave their country ever, no offence, tend to be more boring to me.

Travelling brings such a rich experience to those who prioritize their earnings to accommodate it, that not doing so really lessens their life experience.

I don't look down on people who don't opt to travel, I just DO NOT relate to them.

I cannot understand why a person in a first world country would neve travel.

Return tickets are as little as 1500 from Syd to Los Angeles for crying out loud. Everyone medium income earner who has saved for years can afford that plus 2 weeks budget accommodation....
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