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Working full time with a second job plus studying full time. Help!


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Old 22nd May 2014, 9:58 PM   #1
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Working full time with a second job plus studying full time. Help!

Help guys.

I need tips on how to handle full time study and work.

And I mean full time.

I will not only be a live in nanny albeit in a very nice house/in a nice area and with a nice family (thankgod), BUT...I also got a job at a patisserie. They said they are going to work around my hours that I am available, which is during the day from 10 - 2, and weekends. I will also be volunteering for one hour per week/helping a child improve his reading. I love it.

So I get my evenings off from about 7 ish....I am a night owl so I was thinking to study from 7 until 11. Then cram study for 6 to 7 hours during my weekends since I have WEEKENDS OFF from the nanny job. I suppose that will be my time to study. Evenings and weekends. With work during the day and on days off from the patisserie gig I will study.

Should I have a small energy drink prior to study or will that hinder me form sleeping and in turn, make me TIRED and crazy the next day

Any tips?

I have been formerly lazy, living in a huge flat without my parents even living with me. They own it. I have lived here. I have never "had" to work before.
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Old 22nd May 2014, 10:00 PM   #2
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I have to volunteer once a week for that hour, as I am doing a diploma of youth work which is essentially volunteering for 400 hours and then doing some easy work, it doesn't involve very academic writing and I can do it in my University holidays.....

SO I wont touch the diploma work until my breaks off from University. I will just do the volunteering component.
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Old 23rd May 2014, 12:54 PM   #3
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Not many people like to hear it where caffeine is concerned, but caffeine is just like any other drug stimulant -- it makes you energetic briefly and then it makes you sluggish in the morning.

I drank caffeine my whole life, and my whole life I was sluggish in the mornings and not worth a damn until I had my caffeine. I wanted to sleep all morning. Then I went on a structured diet that made you leave caffeine behind, so I did that. Within two months, I was no longer sluggish and tired in the morning. I would wake up feeling much more alert and wake up earlier and not feel I "needed" something to wake up. It also lessened my anxiety levels and made me a better sleeper in general.

Caffeine is a drug that makes you crash afterward. I advise to get through this period, you give up caffeine entirely. I promise you'll do much better that way. I am old and work two jobs, so I know what it's like. You need to not have anything you're dependent on.
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Old 23rd May 2014, 1:19 PM   #4
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If you're going to do all of this, you need to do so intelligently.

I might suggest that 4 hours a night of studying is overkill. If you need to study that much, you're doing it wrong.

I say that as a double major + minor from my college time in Computer Science, Religion, and English Literature from Boston University. With that full course load and a job, I only ever had to study 2 to 3 hours a night.

You'll need to have some stuff done for you. If you're wasting two hours on the weekend doing laundry, consider dropping it off at a laundromat to have them do it for you.

On the weekend, make sure not to cram at home. Go somewhere nice to study, otherwise you will drive yourself crazy and get cabin fever.

Also, set aside an hour or two on the weekend for down time.

You'll be having a full plate, but it is manageable as long as you take care of yourself and don't get overly stressed.
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Old 23rd May 2014, 2:16 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by preraph View Post
Not many people like to hear it where caffeine is concerned, but caffeine is just like any other drug stimulant -- it makes you energetic briefly and then it makes you sluggish in the morning.

I drank caffeine my whole life, and my whole life I was sluggish in the mornings and not worth a damn until I had my caffeine. I wanted to sleep all morning. Then I went on a structured diet that made you leave caffeine behind, so I did that. Within two months, I was no longer sluggish and tired in the morning. I would wake up feeling much more alert and wake up earlier and not feel I "needed" something to wake up. It also lessened my anxiety levels and made me a better sleeper in general.

Caffeine is a drug that makes you crash afterward. I advise to get through this period, you give up caffeine entirely. I promise you'll do much better that way. I am old and work two jobs, so I know what it's like. You need to not have anything you're dependent on.
Damn, you really answered all my questions without my asking. I never knew why I was sluggish in the morning until now...even when I've had enough sleep. I feel like I've just had an epiphany.
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Old 23rd May 2014, 9:55 PM   #6
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Ok.

I am giving up energy drinks.

I have wantedto gget healthier for years and giving up those god awful drinks is a small albeit helpful start.
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Old 23rd May 2014, 9:58 PM   #7
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My degree is a low grad one as it's only two and a half years long and I don't need to learn any theory or difficult concepts.

So 3 hours a night every day including weekends sounds like a part time degree?
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Old 24th May 2014, 2:31 AM   #8
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Sigh, people seem to think you can just go in and make a decent living without a degree.

They say unless you do a "hard" degree, with hard math or science for instance as in engineering, business, IT, computer science, food science, chartered accounting, marketing OR the non math law degree, that it is POINTLESS getting ANY OTHER degree and you may as well just get into retail or sales and work your way up.

Why is it pointless to want to work directly with people that are disadvantaged on a daily basis and try to link them to services/improve their lives? You still make enough working in community development and as a social worker to pay the bills, take out a mortgage and not starve or live in a total dump.

I don't understand why people are short sighted enough to think an unskilled person like myself can just walk into a 40 - 50 K job. Yeah RIGHT. Only a select few individuals have the business mind to excel without tertiary education! I AM NOT one of them. I need to pick my passion and select a path, with the help of a career counsellor, that has a high rate of landing jobs, has a growing industry..

I basically picked what I was passionate about and took the path I needed that is the MOST likely path to result in employment in that field.

I am not sure why people assume there is any other way to achieving your dreams other than hard work and luck/opportunity?
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Old 24th May 2014, 2:32 AM   #9
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I cannot imagine working towards anything other than what I feel strongly about and have a purpose in doing?
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Old 24th May 2014, 2:42 AM   #10
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The absolute most important thing to do in regards to getting your degree is knowing what jobs you can do with your degree. The jobs you can do must also be in demand.

The last thing you want to do is have a degree in something like archaeology where you will never find a job.

For women, that is more acceptable as long as the husband has a real job that can support both of them.

BTW: Your schedule sounds crazy. Good luck
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Old 24th May 2014, 3:00 AM   #11
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I have no problem with you pursuing your passion. Do what you love, do it well and the financial rewards will follow. It may take more time in some fields and situations, but I believe it's difficult to become truly successful without doing something that you love.

Avoid the energy drinks.

I also worked full-time while in college. At times, I had two part time jobs and often worked 40 to 60 hours a week between them. My senior year, I was fortunate to land a full-time night shift job. I was able to complete my work in about 4 hours which left me 4 hours to study.

I looked at working full-time while going to college as a blessing because it forced me to make the best use of my time. Forced me to be focused, organized and disciplined. I seemed to get the best grades when I was the most busy because that's also when I was the most focused and productive.

Pay attention to what works and doesn't work for you and adjust accordingly. I don't think any of us can tell you what will work for you and what won't other than generic suggestions like being focused, organized, disciplined and consistent. Just know that you can be very successful academically while working and those time management skills you learn will be helpful later.

Good luck!
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Old 24th May 2014, 5:07 AM   #12
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Leigh

How will this patisserie job work out when the kids are not in school during holidays etc. Won't you be expected to take care of them then?

As for the rest of your schedule. You need to build in some time out. You cannot be working or studying all day, every day without burning yourself out.
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Old 24th May 2014, 5:09 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by somedude81 View Post
The absolute most important thing to do in regards to getting your degree is knowing what jobs you can do with your degree. The jobs you can do must also be in demand.

The last thing you want to do is have a degree in something like archaeology where you will never find a job.

For women, that is more acceptable as long as the husband has a real job that can support both of them.

BTW: Your schedule sounds crazy. Good luck

I am getting the community development degree then a masters in social work.

I made sure it was a booming industry, employment wise, before signing up.

It won't likely be hard to get employment in the actual field fairly early on after graduating, but the pay won't be good until several years down the track ONCE you have worked your way up into management which is only really possible with ADDITIONAL diplomas or an additional masters degree.

Or you could always work 10 plus years and hope to pave the pathway into a more senior position however, working harder and acquiring another qualification or two within a 4 year process will enable me to move up in the ranks and get a better salary.

But yeah, my area of passion has a lot of jobs on offer, lol, cos NO ONE ELSE WANTS TO DO my future job, LOL.

Taking kids away from parents? It is not everyone's cup of tea....Not to mention very unsafe in rough areas. Although Australia isn't as bad as the US.
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Old 24th May 2014, 5:11 AM   #14
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Leigh

How will this patisserie job work out when the kids are not in school during holidays etc. Won't you be expected to take care of them then?

As for the rest of your schedule. You need to build in some time out. You cannot be working or studying all day, every day without burning yourself out.

They said to call them to arrange the hours I am available. They work around our availability as long as we give them a few weeks warning, which they really appreciate.

Not sure if I am even needed in school holidays, we didn't discus how often they needed me in those situations MINUS the school runs....
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Old 24th May 2014, 5:37 AM   #15
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You mean you have still not discussed the job requirements in full? Seriously Leigh you need to have that conversation as an absolute priority. You are going to be living in their house and you must all be absolutely clear on what falls within your duties. It's not like other jobs where you actually get away from the workplace at the end of the day. I am afraid to say that I am still skeptical about the amount you are being paid plus accommodation etc for the small amount of work you describe. It does not stack up.
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