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Are grasses that much greener with higher education?


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Old 16th March 2014, 2:20 PM   #16
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For me, the grass is MUCH greener.

My job now where I work in the field I got my Master's can't even compare to when I was waiting tables in college.

I love my job now whereas waiting tables was awful, so I am very, very glad I went to grad school. I wouldn't have my job without my Master's, as it's the minimum degree required.
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Old 16th March 2014, 2:33 PM   #17
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My husband has been facing something similar. He also wants to get into HR, but has had minimal success since all those positions want you to already have experience. He has an associates and bachelors in business and has over a year experience working in an office, underpaid and still having a hard time finding a full time administrative/HR position. Now he is trying for a job with the state. My advice is to try and get some experience before going back to school.

I've been working full time in admin since 2006....got plenty of experience. But no network :-/.


Hope your husband gets into state, he'd be set.
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Old 16th March 2014, 6:05 PM   #18
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I've been working full time in admin since 2006....got plenty of experience. But no network :-/.


Hope your husband gets into state, he'd be set.
It sounds like a bachelors degree will help you since you already have the experience. Does your company offer any sort of tuition reimbursement program?
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Old 16th March 2014, 7:03 PM   #19
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It sounds like a bachelors degree will help you since you already have the experience. Does your company offer any sort of tuition reimbursement program?

I already have a bachelor's, it's the master's I stopped pursuing for now.
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Old 16th March 2014, 7:27 PM   #20
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I don't know that a Masters helps all that much in working - I've been told that if what you desire is climbing the corporate ladder, putting those 2 years into getting work experience and networking is more beneficial instead.

IMO a Masters or PhD is only necessary if you're aiming for a career in academia. With the exception of a few jobs that require a Masters (architecture I think, and medicine in the USA?)
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Old 17th March 2014, 3:57 AM   #21
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In the US, a Master's degree is pretty much an unspoken requirement for accessing senior management roles (Director, VP, etc). You can get there without a Bachelor's, but it's rare and you will probably have a hard time being considered for C-level roles beyond that.

For non-management roles, it depends on the field. For technology roles it's pretty much irrelevant. For other jobs such as social work, and professional fields (ie finance, accounting, etc) is not necessary but you will be given access to better-paid roles if you do have it. To be a college professor in the US, a Master's won't even get you very far... you may get a teaching job but you won't get a tenure-track position without a PhD.
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Old 17th March 2014, 4:37 AM   #22
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IMO, having higher education whether bachelor, masters or doctorate is truly great asset in finding work. Yet, it doesn't guarantee that you will have greener grasses. You should have also skills, ability, experience and industrious too. Bachelor degree can be stepping stone but skills, ability, experience and industrious is your license to have greener pasture. Since not all that we learned from our schools is use in the job that is offer to us.
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Old 18th March 2014, 4:06 AM   #23
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Like some have said, it really depends on what degree you are going for. If you are going to major in liberal arts, dancing, history, or basket weaving, you are going to have a really hard time using those for a career, unless you are in an ivy league school, in which investment banking option can open up only due to the fact of being in such a school.

I'm going to guess that this is not an option open to you so it really come down to what type of degree and field you are trying to enter. You have to look at the current market and see what is in demand, and what degrees open the doors for you. Someone mentioned the medical field and some of the options are good, but some not so much.

Take the nursing field. About 5~10 years ago, you would get hired right away with just an associate degree in nursing, due to the demand. Now? Very difficult to get into the field due to the saturation of people getting a nursing degree, people going into the field for the money, and the number of schools opening up that can provide the degree.

It's the same with being a lawyer. Look at how many law schools there are in the US, way too many lawyers, very difficult to get a good paying job as a lawyer to help take care of the debt you build up. So yes, there are many degrees that won't pay out well, but there are some that will, but you have to research and be able to actually earn, so I will list some of them and the one I am currently pursuing.

1) Engineering - This goes into a wide range of different fields and has some good aspect. Some of the really good ones are electrical, chemical, and mechanical. Just a bachelor's degree can get you a position with a well paying job, and a master will help boost your income.

2) Medical Degree - AkA becoming a doctor. Pay ranges for this field is anywhere from 90k ~ 250k+ . This path comes with a huge time commitment, a large amount of debt, and also you have to actually want to be a doctor (care about people and such )

3) Specialized field that require a bachelors - These are special field where you have to pass certain exams and other requirements to enter. CPA is one of them, which I have heard can yield large gains from.

The other, which I am pursuing is becoming an actuary, a field not many really know about. To summarize, actuaries work with insurance company and "do the numbers" behind the risks and benefits of insurance. Aside from having a bachelors, you also need to pass a large number of exams, the first two being calculus based statistics / probability and finance.

The beauty of this field, is once you pass the first two exams and have your bachelors, you can enter the field very easily starting at around 50~60k. The companies will pay for your future exam and materials you require for them, and even allocate time at work for just studying. Almost never work over 40 hours a week, for each exam you pass you get a pay bump of 10~20k, and once you are done with all the exams (takes about 8 years after getting your bachelors) you make around 250k a year.

Now here is the thing that should be noticed about all of these fields, and why they are in such high demand. They are very hard to get into due to their difficultly, thus there is such a demand for people capable of doing said job. It is the basis supply and demand of economics (if you haven't notice, my major is economics ) Just to give you an idea of the difficulty of being an actuary, those exams I mentioned, the passing rate for each one is around 30%, that means 70% of the people that attempt the exam don't pass, at each stage. CPA is the same way (in fact I think it is even worse), engineering requires high levels of math and physical logic, medical school a great understanding of chemistry and biology.

So to sum up everything I said, is higher education a waste of time and money? It can be if not planned accordingly. But if you plan it carefully and follow the market, it can be one of the best investments in yourself.
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Old 18th March 2014, 4:26 PM   #24
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I agree with the above. My dad said his 24 year old roommate makes around 75k as a manager for tesla or something like that and in his words "Only with a bachelors in engineering". Well, that says it all right there. You're not going to make $50k out the door with a Business degree unless you have at least a few years experience.
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Old 3rd April 2014, 1:06 AM   #25
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I'm speaking from experience, I wouldn't bother pursuing a higher education. I have a graduate degree in business that has never amounted to much of anything.
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Old 10th April 2014, 2:45 AM   #26
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I am finding the grass is not any greener with a higher education.... I only have an Associates and wanted to pursue a 4 year degree like every normal person does, which not doing me any good. Im still working at dead end jobs, cant seem to make a living wage, and still not getting ahead. How am I to pay for such expensive education at these wages?

I have been left lonely and frustrated to figure things out on my own at home with very little to no guidance at all. The information I do obtain to further my education is either wrong or misinformation. I am having a bit of trouble having faith and trust in people that are trying to help.

At this point IMO, I dont think going into debt over a higher education is going to help.
I don't see it as a one size fits all.

In my town, yes you need a 4 year degree because this is a small town and your options are getting at least your 4-year and this will put you in upper - to higher middle class salary, or working at Wal-Mart. The people I know with at least a 4 year are all thriving and doing well, those without not so much.

But, there are not many options here for uneducated people so that's the way the cloth cuts. I think it certainly takes more than just a degree though. What is your work experience? What and who are your references? Did you do any internships/assisting while completing your education? There are things you can do to boost your options post grad, in my experience.

You have to spend money to make money, but of course like all must investments you need to be wise and not every person is. There are people you see in the news who spend so much on tuition at this fancy schmance schools only to go into a profession that nets 35k a year. Or, people who choose a career path that has very limited job opportunities.

Assoc. alone does very little unless say something like an RN program, but it could just be the area I live in.
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Old 10th April 2014, 3:13 AM   #27
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I have a degree and it did NOTHING for me.
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Old 10th April 2014, 4:11 AM   #28
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I have a degree and it did NOTHING for me.
See above.
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Old 10th April 2014, 1:08 PM   #29
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Yes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2p3...ature=youtu.be
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Old 11th April 2014, 1:03 AM   #30
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I have a degree and it did NOTHING for me.

What type of degree? e.g. 2 year, 4 year, etc.

What was your major?

What kind of networking did you do and did you have contacts in your field upon graduating?

Do any interning / assisting, or volunteering to get experience in the field?
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