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Picking Career in Mid to Late 20's


Business and Professional Relationships Networking and maintaining a positive environment in the work place is important! Surviving the 9-to-5 within.

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Old 20th December 2012, 5:01 AM   #91
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I have just figured out when things get really hard for me and i am struggling it triggers me to want to study.....and i never finish it because i get sick......yep took up study right smack in the middle of a depression again...i have printed out the assignments...and they are on the floor in my room////sustainable agriculture....deb
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Old 20th December 2012, 11:41 AM   #92
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Of course no job is easy to find. The best you can do, is pick a degree where you talk to both a career expert/guide, and proffessionals in the industry, as well as doing your online research of first hand accounts of what it is like to get a job in the field.....
Through talking to several people, the right people, you can pretty much determine if there are many jobs out there in the industry, if your likely to get a job in that field, in addition to other things about the job.

For instance, you know IT and engineering are well paid jobs. You also know that there are many useless degrees if you do not think it through, and figure out what work you can get through your degree.
You can find out a little bit about: weather there are many jobs out there in the field, and the likelyhood of you even getting a job within the first year of graduating.
From what I know in regards to social work, if you are passionate about helping those people, and have an appealing persinality, are prepared to work hard, and are just positive and eager to start work, you will likely find a job as a social worker.

I am not going to major in anything that has a LOW likelyhood of me getting a job out of. That is for sure.
What I have going for me is: a warm and caring personality that gets along with most people, hard working, will apply all day every day for the job and come across as personable, friendly..
Best of all, I think I have enough of a "spark" about me, that WILL ultimately make at least SOME people want to give me a chance at a job in the industry.

The problem with getting work now, is that I am going for the lowest jobs on the job chain; fast food, food serving at cheap establishments, and the like.
I am NOT always super fast at serving and doing all those things, on my trial (first shift). I am, however, good at doing it all after a few shifts, but either want teenagers that they can pay less OR extremely experienced adults in their mid 20's.

I will get over 200 a week on student allowance, and plan to live on about 60 dollars a week (although I have not worked it out exactly yet).
No, you are misunderstanding what I wrote: I meant one of my classmates flunked out of school. It had nothing to do with finding a job...my class has not graduated yet. I know a lot of people dismiss the social work program as "easy" but it isn't easy for everyone. Same as hard sciencs, math, accounting, and yes, the social sciences are not easy for every one. I know some people who failed sociology too, although many people dismiss it as "easy".

You are right that one should research the field one wants to go into, and some degrees are more likely to get you hired than others. Where I live, social work is one of the degrees that should get you a job. Out of everyone I know who has studied social work (not social service worker diploma, not social science degrees, but bachelor of social work) the only ones I know who are not employed in the field are working in other fields because they chose to leave the field and find other work. I do not know of a single person who has studied social work and not gotten a job in the field. I'm sure there are some, I just haven't met any. But, I live in an area that has a real need for social workers, and some positions are left vacant for years because it is too hard to get social workers to fill those jobs.

My class has one semester left until graduation, and some of the social service agencies are telling my classmates and me to apply yesterday. Every one I've spoken to, including professors and social work professionals, expects that everyone in my class will be employed as social workers after we graduate. As far as "useless degrees" (your term) go, where I live social sciences such as sociology, psychology, etc. are considered "useless" unless you go on to do your master's, and then you have to qualify for that ie. get a high enough GPA, get good references, work experience (sometimes) etc. Of course, things may be different where you live.

Last edited by Nanuk; 20th December 2012 at 11:48 AM..
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Old 23rd December 2012, 3:39 AM   #93
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No, you are misunderstanding what I wrote: I meant one of my classmates flunked out of school. It had nothing to do with finding a job...my class has not graduated yet. I know a lot of people dismiss the social work program as "easy" but it isn't easy for everyone. Same as hard sciencs, math, accounting, and yes, the social sciences are not easy for every one. I know some people who failed sociology too, although many people dismiss it as "easy".

You are right that one should research the field one wants to go into, and some degrees are more likely to get you hired than others. Where I live, social work is one of the degrees that should get you a job. Out of everyone I know who has studied social work (not social service worker diploma, not social science degrees, but bachelor of social work) the only ones I know who are not employed in the field are working in other fields because they chose to leave the field and find other work. I do not know of a single person who has studied social work and not gotten a job in the field. I'm sure there are some, I just haven't met any. But, I live in an area that has a real need for social workers, and some positions are left vacant for years because it is too hard to get social workers to fill those jobs.

My class has one semester left until graduation, and some of the social service agencies are telling my classmates and me to apply yesterday. Every one I've spoken to, including professors and social work professionals, expects that everyone in my class will be employed as social workers after we graduate. As far as "useless degrees" (your term) go, where I live social sciences such as sociology, psychology, etc. are considered "useless" unless you go on to do your master's, and then you have to qualify for that ie. get a high enough GPA, get good references, work experience (sometimes) etc. Of course, things may be different where you live.


But why is social sciences or social work useless, as far as degrees go?

And sh*t, do you HAVE to do that well if you are to do your masters??????

I was thinking of getting credits, not distinctions or anything....

I was considering an HR Management masters. Which could lead to a good paying job if you work hard and have a knack at it.

Should I do a bachelor of social sciences or a bachelor of social

I know with social work, at least I will get a job. I really like the idea of helping people in that way.

Lastly: do ALL social workers start on 30K and end up on 30K the rest of their careers? it is just waitresses get about 20 - 30 K if they work full time, so.........

You know, I do not want to do a four year degree to get paid the same as a waitress does. NOTHING against waitresses, I want to be one throughout Uni, but studying for years at a time should result in a higher pay check than workers who have not studied at all or worked hard to GEt their job...
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Old 23rd December 2012, 6:02 AM   #94
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For my degree I needed to get a Distinction (70%+) average to do Honours or Masters. It may be different for whichever institution you've applied for, and different again depending on which degree you decide on. You should be able to check the prerequisites for those higher-level courses on the university's website, or in the UAC book, or just ring up the department and ask for some help understanding how their program works.

It really depends on the field (I don't know much about social work) but generally:
It's possible to get a good job with a Bachelor's degree (it just means they'll have to give you a bit of extra training)
It's possible to get a good job with Honours/Masters (you might start in a higher pay bracket)
It's possible to get a good job with a PhD (you will definitely start in a higher pay bracket)
It's possible to get a good job with no degree, but it may not be one you really want. It all depends on what you actually want to spend your time doing. If you don't want to be a waitress, don't be one. If you want to be a social worker, become one.If you can live comfortably on $30K, that's marvelous, and if you don't want to, work hard so that you'll climb that ladder.
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Old 23rd December 2012, 3:26 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by Leigh 87 View Post
But why is social sciences or social work useless, as far as degrees go?

And sh*t, do you HAVE to do that well if you are to do your masters??????

I was thinking of getting credits, not distinctions or anything....

I was considering an HR Management masters. Which could lead to a good paying job if you work hard and have a knack at it.

Should I do a bachelor of social sciences or a bachelor of social

I know with social work, at least I will get a job. I really like the idea of helping people in that way.

Lastly: do ALL social workers start on 30K and end up on 30K the rest of their careers? it is just waitresses get about 20 - 30 K if they work full time, so.........

You know, I do not want to do a four year degree to get paid the same as a waitress does. NOTHING against waitresses, I want to be one throughout Uni, but studying for years at a time should result in a higher pay check than workers who have not studied at all or worked hard to GEt their job...
I am in the process of applying for my master's in social work for next September, and most of the schools I have looked at require at least a 70% average in the bachelor's program for the master's program.

I am not sure what to tell you....go with your heart. I am not saying these degrees are useless....if I thought social work was useless, I would not be taking it. I know some people with social science degrees who are working as social workers, but only after they got a second degree, a post-degree bachelor of social work. I know some people who got degrees in social sciences like sociology to get jobs as social workers after they graduated, but they found that to do so they would need the second degree. They managed to find positions such as social work assistants, but not jobs as social workers. I know a lot of people with just bachelor's degrees in the social sciences who have jobs that have nothing to do with what they studied, but after they get the master's degrees, they often find jobs that are related. Professional programs like social work, nursing, education, engineering, etc. teach you not only the theories of the field, but teach you "how" to do the work. I had originally wanted to be a psychologist and counsel people and from what I understand (but I could be wrong) in my bachelor of arts or science degree in psychology, I would learn the theories, etc., but I wouldn't learn how to actually counsel people until in the master's program. I know someone who followed this path. In my social work program, which is a professinal program, I have already been taught how to counsel people. After Christmas I will be doing my second internship with the Department of Mental Health and Addictions at a hospital and I will be counselling people, before I get my bachelor's in April.

I am aware that things may be different in Australia, so I try not to make assumptions. I live in Canada, and things may be different in these two countries. For example, I am also wanting to get my degree in law (several universities offer joint master of social work/law degrees) but I think I read somewhere that you can get a bachelor of laws degree in Australia as a first degree and practice as a lawyer; in Canada and I believe the USA too, you pretty much need a bachelor's degree in something first before even applying to law school. My university offers a concentration in Human Resources, but it is in the Faculty of Business, not social sciences. Several of the universities where I live offer HR in business, and entry into those programs usually requires courses in calculus. That is common in a lot of business/commerce programs in Canada, but it may be different where you are. Maybe in Australia, HR is in the social sciences field.

I would think that wherever you are, social workers begin with an entering salary but likely move up after gaining experience. I think where you are might depend on how much you make, as well as the demand for the field. I have heard of social workers making very low salaries in some places, but I live in Northern Canada where there is a high demand for social workers because there is a shortage. Social workers with just bachelor's degrees can make up to $60,000 a year to start where I live, but I live in a rural area that is hard to recruit, so the agencies have to make the job package as attractive as possible. You can get housing in some cases that is free or heavily subsidized. The more experience and training you get, the more you make. I should make more with my master's degree than someone with a bachelor's, and even more still if I go on for my PhD.

Whew! I didn't mean to write a book, but I wanted to further explain some of my comments and address some of your questions. Go with what your heart tells you. I know it's hard. Good luck!

Last edited by Nanuk; 23rd December 2012 at 3:37 PM..
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Old 24th December 2012, 1:25 AM   #96
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For instance, you know IT and engineering are well paid jobs. You also know that there are many useless degrees if you do not think it through, and figure out what work you can get through your degree.
Many jobs that pay well, have high competition for entry.

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Originally Posted by Leigh 87 View Post
I am not going to major in anything that has a LOW likelyhood of me getting a job out of. That is for sure.
That is something to research before you begin your degree to career path. First determine where you want to live. In some areas, social work may be plenteous, in other places not so much. I would guess (knowing little about the field) there will be more work in more progressive, urban areas.

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Lastly: do ALL social workers start on 30K and end up on 30K the rest of their careers? it is just waitresses get about 20 - 30 K if they work full time, so.........

You know, I do not want to do a four year degree to get paid the same as a waitress does. NOTHING against waitresses, I want to be one throughout Uni, but studying for years at a time should result in a higher pay check than workers who have not studied at all or worked hard to GEt their job...
Like most careers, pay will fit with competency. You can get into a job with a degree, but if you are mediocre, you will probably advance more slowly (if at all). Here is some information on social worker salaries:

Social Worker (BSW) Salary - Salary.com

Median salary is $47,409. Median is another way to report average, but is often used to reduce the impact of outliers (people making very little in field and people making very high salary).

Profile from US News and World Report:

Child & Family Social Worker Job Overview | Best Jobs | US News Careers

In case you are not aware, you do not have to go into college knowing 100% what you want to do. No need to stress making major decisions so soon. The first year or two is generally basic prerequisites required by pretty much all degrees. You can go to a community college to take these then transfer to a four year university. Will be cheaper and generally smaller classes. Once you are enrolled, you can talk to a counselor in the career services center or academic advisor at your college. They will generally have a self-assessments you can take which can help you devise a career plan based on your interests and skills. Usually you will also get to talk to faculty and students.

Good luck!!
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Old 26th December 2012, 3:30 AM   #97
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Wow. I am overwhelmed with the detailed and time consuming responses. Especially from the poster who is DOING her degree in social work.
I am not certain I want to follow in your path; I definately want to study to be a social worker.
After MUCH consideration, I have decided to do a degree in social work.
I have thought a good few months about which degree I want, based on the employment prospects I wish for.

The determining factor in my decision was: with a social work degree, I just have to pass to get employment, and be flexible (willing to move for work).
You do not need a masters or to do honours in social work to get a job in the field. Where as with a degree in social sciences, if you do not do well in the degree, there are very few options I can think of. From what I have seen, you need a masters after your bachelor of social sciences in order to get anywhere.

I am determined, have a nice personalility and work well with people, and have a HUGE drive to work in the area of social work. Therefore, even if I do not get a masters in social work or even honours, I feel that there is les pressure on me; it looks like I can get a job as a social worker even if I DO NOT do that well at Uni (despite my best efforts)

So there you have it. I have honestly thought a LOT... ALOT about my future career. I am certain this time. I have picked exactly what I WANT to do, that is within my academic capacity. I DID want to be a nutritionist in 2010, however it was too difficult and was riddled with science and math... I just did not do enough school to handle that without extensive tutoring....

A nutritionist and social worker were always my top two career titles I aspired to; I tried one, it did not work out, so I am opting for the other one.
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Old 26th December 2012, 3:35 AM   #98
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Originally Posted by TheFinalWord View Post
Many jobs that pay well, have high competition for entry.



That is something to research before you begin your degree to career path. First determine where you want to live. In some areas, social work may be plenteous, in other places not so much. I would guess (knowing little about the field) there will be more work in more progressive, urban areas.



Like most careers, pay will fit with competency. You can get into a job with a degree, but if you are mediocre, you will probably advance more slowly (if at all). Here is some information on social worker salaries:

Social Worker (BSW) Salary - Salary.com

Median salary is $47,409. Median is another way to report average, but is often used to reduce the impact of outliers (people making very little in field and people making very high salary).

Profile from US News and World Report:

Child & Family Social Worker Job Overview | Best Jobs | US News Careers

In case you are not aware, you do not have to go into college knowing 100% what you want to do. No need to stress making major decisions so soon. The first year or two is generally basic prerequisites required by pretty much all degrees. You can go to a community college to take these then transfer to a four year university. Will be cheaper and generally smaller classes. Once you are enrolled, you can talk to a counselor in the career services center or academic advisor at your college. They will generally have a self-assessments you can take which can help you devise a career plan based on your interests and skills. Usually you will also get to talk to faculty and students.

Good luck!!

Thank you! I am really, really looking forward to studying actually.. I never applied myself in high school AT ALL (despite having the ability to get A's and B;'s in everything)

I am at a stage in my life where I have a HUGE drive to study; it sounds strange, but I ALWAYS always knew that my ""time"" to study for a career would just "come"when I was "ready..... Do you understand?

That time has come now. And I have never been more certain of what profession I want to be.
And look, starting at about 30k and progressing to 50k would be just lovely! I would be thrilled!

I am VERY passionate about the job, and I believe people who are passionate about their jobs, succeed. Because it will be hard and I won't get paid well at first, if ever.... So the drive I have to BE a social worker will serve me well.


I will update everyone when I am a year through my degree.
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Old 1st January 2013, 5:11 AM   #99
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I have finalized my decision: I changed my application to either a bachelor of social work, or a bachelor of teaching.

Social work of teaching will most likely get me a job at least, and you can earn a living doing them if your single and childess, and live cheaply.

They are both my ideal careers that I most want to do; besides nutrition, which I never liked any more than those other two.



................................




I have to do basic math in order to do either of those degrees, so I am going to do one year without math and ely the math section to the second year or even third.

I am not able to go right into math without AT LEAST 6 months math tuition.

Lucky, I have found a tutor: my friend who is an engineer. Who will only charge 20 dollars per hour. WAY cheaper than most tutors!




..............................

So there ya go people, I will have to re learn the most basic math after all, and then do it for ONE semester total.

It's no big deal, just a on going tutoring for up to a year might be needed.
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Old 1st January 2013, 8:01 PM   #100
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Good for you! Sometimes we just have to do stuff we normally don't want to do, to get what we want in the end!

I guess standards are different in different countries. I didn't have to do any math - at all - for my BSW degree. As for salary, several people I know who are not single or childless make good livings as teachers and social workers, but again, I know that salaries are different based on where you live, demand for workers, work loads, etc. Sounds like you should make a comfortable living though...that's good.

Good luck!
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Old 1st January 2013, 10:20 PM   #101
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I have to do basic math in order to do either of those degrees, so I am going to do one year without math and ely the math section to the second year or even third.

I am not able to go right into math without AT LEAST 6 months math tuition.

Lucky, I have found a tutor: my friend who is an engineer. Who will only charge 20 dollars per hour. WAY cheaper than most tutors!


So there ya go people, I will have to re learn the most basic math after all, and then do it for ONE semester total.

It's no big deal, just a on going tutoring for up to a year might be needed.
Believe it or not, I had to take a math class 5 times before passing. Couldn't pass it at community college and ironically I passed it the first try at my University. Anyways, I actually recommend you get the math out of the way as soon as you can. Don't push the hardest subjects towards the end. I wanted to do this, but ended up having to the last dreaded math class my first year at University...passed and it's over with. And now I'm glad I got it done. There should also be plenty of free resources as far as tutors, I would avoid even spending a cent if I were you.
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Old 2nd January 2013, 5:13 AM   #102
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Thanks for the imput.

I am in Australia. You do not need a masters in teaching or social work just to get a job here.

I am leaning móre towards social work actually; the word, in whichever country, needs people to help others deal with crisis. SO many people here are on welfare (centrelink we call it in AUS) and so many families are in crisis situations.

In fact, I would be in a crisis situation, if it were not for my parents really nice flat which they let me reside in; or, my partners lovely huge house, which his father lets us both reside in, rent free.

I live an extremely comfrotable life, more so than MOST professions can afford right now.

Therefore, that pushes me to want to help more people! Seeing as I too, would be on the crisis list for social workers, would it not be for my parents and partners father.



..........

Yeah, so I need maths out of the way ASAP, I am just going to find out what math I need for social work, and then get a tutor for 6 months to one year.

My mate in the US who is bright (but had not done math in ten years due to being a mature ages Uni student) had to do ONE WHOLE YEAR of math tutoring BEFORE EVEN STARTING the social work math.

I may need a year of math tutoring just to pass ONE SEMESTER (6 months) of college level BASIC math.

I am not happy about the math at all - I do not think you need 6 month of math for SOCIAL WORK, but oh well. Whatever.

I will do what it takes in order to get the job I want. 6 months of math at Uni is no big sacrifice.

I may find that after 12 years of no math, that basic math is not that bad.

Who knows.
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Old 28th January 2013, 8:40 PM   #103
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Leigh how are you going? Why is it when i started a thread earlier I never got this many detailed answers on here? All I got is you should be grateful for your current job, despite getting screwed over big time. Why didn't anyone answer my questions about what field I should do? (Sorry if ive hijacked a bit).
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Old 30th January 2013, 3:02 PM   #104
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Have you found out which math you need ?

I think you will find that you won't need a tutor for math, there are alternatives ... but it depends which type it is, and if you have an example.
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Old 30th January 2013, 6:57 PM   #105
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Have you found out which math you need ?

I think you will find that you won't need a tutor for math, there are alternatives ... but it depends which type it is, and if you have an example.



Well I got into social work - a 50k job here ultimately, that you walk into if you simply volenteer before your finish your degree.
Not the highest paid job but one I can easily live on and save.
Ill be doing what I WANT, and be able to live off of it. ANd save for travel if I save.





RADU- there are not actual math courses in and of themselves... You know how they list the "courses" within each subject?

We do about 4 courses per semester I think.
Each course makes up 1/4 of our time..
Now, there IS a tiny bit of math WITHIN one course.There were about 12 things within that course though, that we are going to look into in a shallow way.... NOTHING in depth.
You only learn the math you need for social work, no allegbra or stupid crap we do not need.

NORMALLY for math - there is a whole course decidated to math, that you do as an actual couse...
With teaching - math is one of the 4 ot 5 courses you have for each semester.


......I am doing so little math that I will only need my friend, who is an engineer, to help me.
He has kindly offered to help me whenever I need help, he is a VERY nice person, and I have no doubt he will help me on short notice.
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