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Hiring someone who has been fired?


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Old 14th December 2009, 11:50 AM   #16
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LB...

Spin...

You need to work on your spin so that even though you were let go with cause that the interviewer has no real idea.

You can spin a "I got fired for not doing my job" into "They let me go because the company was downsizing and you were having a personality conflict with your bosses boss".

Just spin it to look in your favor... Make it look like it was the best thing happened to you and it was just a stepping stone onto better things..
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Old 14th December 2009, 11:50 AM   #17
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Honestly, high school jobs are not heavily weight toward your first job after you have obtained your degree.
Well, yea I understand that. But how could they ever find that out? I don't think there are records of employment history anywhere. My friend left a job off her resume (a professional one) that she worked at for 8 months and got hired at a marketing firm. They never found out or questioned her about it (she has worked there for 3 years now).

I know I will have a gap but it's pretty easy to say that I just couldn't find a job in my field after college given the current economic situation.
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Old 14th December 2009, 11:52 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Art_Critic View Post
LB...

Spin...

You need to work on your spin so that even though you were let go with cause that the interviewer has no real idea.

You can spin a "I got fired for not doing my job" into "They let me go because the company was downsizing and you were having a personality conflict with your bosses boss".

Just spin it to look in your favor... Make it look like it was the best thing happened to you and it was just a stepping stone onto better things..
I said the personality conflict at one interview and didn't get hired.

I didn't get laid off though, and if they call my work, couldn't they say they would rehire me if I were just downsized. My work is saying they wouldn't rehire me....that looks bad!
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Old 14th December 2009, 11:58 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Lauriebell82 View Post

So what other response would be good? I don't even know!
Okay, since all they are doing is confirming the dates you work there, that is a good (and they are following the law).

You have to turn what they are saying into a positive; "you didn't meet their standards." But in the interview, tell all the GREAT things about the job and the positive things you learned there. It will come across as a bad attitude to say you don't know what the true problem was.

ALLUDE to a discrepancy in the wardrobe coordination versus anything emotional or political -- that will make the "not meeting of standards" appear oddly benign instead of directly regarding your job performance. The important thing in an interview is to not dwell on why or the fact that you were fired, but that you loved the job, learned a lot, and had if pressed, had a misunderstanding about the uniform.
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Old 14th December 2009, 12:01 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Lauriebell82 View Post
I said the personality conflict at one interview and didn't get hired.

I didn't get laid off though, and if they call my work, couldn't they say they would rehire me if I were just downsized. My work is saying they wouldn't rehire me....that looks bad!

BIG NO-NO!!!! Never, never, never say personality conflict. Because, as far as the hiring person is concerned, YOU were the one fired so you were the one causing the problems.
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Old 14th December 2009, 12:02 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Lauriebell82 View Post
I don't think there are records of employment history anywhere.
Of course there are. It is your credit report and by applying for a job, many employers pull the credit history of potential employees as part of a routine back-ground check.
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Old 14th December 2009, 12:03 PM   #22
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Okay, since all they are doing is confirming the dates you work there, that is a good (and they are following the law).

You have to turn what they are saying into a positive; "you didn't meet their standards." But in the interview, tell all the GREAT things about the job and the positive things you learned there. It will come across as a bad attitude to say you don't know what the true problem was.

ALLUDE to a discrepancy in the wardrobe coordination versus anything emotional or political -- that will make the "not meeting of standards" appear oddly benign instead of directly regarding your job performance. The important thing in an interview is to not dwell on why or the fact that you were fired, but that you loved the job, learned a lot, and had if pressed, had a misunderstanding about the uniform.
Yeah, it really wasn't performance related (at least from what they had told me) it was more minor personality conflict type deals.

Yours is a good idea, to spin it as the standards were more just company policy related and not due to my performance as a counselor.

So what would be a good way of saying something about the uniform?
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Old 14th December 2009, 12:06 PM   #23
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Of course there are. It is your credit report and by applying for a job, many employers pull the credit history of potential employees as part of a routine back-ground check.
Hmm, possibly. In social services though you generally need to only get a criminal history background check, child abuse, and an FBI fingerprint clearance. I don't know if a credit report check is included or not..I'm thinking no...not sure though!

They won't hire me anyway though if I get fired! Kind of a catch 22 I guess...

Oh agreed about the personality conflict..it looks like I start fights. I never said that again after that.
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Old 14th December 2009, 12:16 PM   #24
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So what would be a good way of saying something about the uniform?
Interviewer: "So, tell me about Job Blah-Blah."

LB: "I loved that job. <Expand on all the great factors about the job.>"

Interviewer: "And why are you no longer there?"

LB: "Unfortunately, I was told it was a discrepancy in following the company's standards regarding the uniform. I have a feeling it might have been more than that, but when I inquired, I was not given any additional information. It is a shame because I loved <and then go back into all the POSITIVE stuff about the job.>"
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Old 14th December 2009, 12:46 PM   #25
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Interviewer: "So, tell me about Job Blah-Blah."

LB: "I loved that job. <Expand on all the great factors about the job.>"

Interviewer: "And why are you no longer there?"

LB: "Unfortunately, I was told it was a discrepancy in following the company's standards regarding the uniform. I have a feeling it might have been more than that, but when I inquired, I was not given any additional information. It is a shame because I loved <and then go back into all the POSITIVE stuff about the job.>"
That sounds pretty good actually! The only thing that I worry about is that it just sounds terrible. I guess I'm all paranoid now.

Oh, actually my fiance just said that they only way they could find out where I worked is if I applied for a credit card and listed my employer. I don't have any credit cards and have not applied for any loans for the time period that I worked at my job. Plus it costs money and social services wouldn't pay for it since most of them make you pay for your own clearances (criminal history, child abuse, ect.) I think I'm safe in that aspect. Anyway, the worst they can do is find out my employment history and not hire me. They aren't hiring me anyway! I really don't have much to lose anymore...
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Old 14th December 2009, 12:58 PM   #26
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Pull your own credit report and double check (you are allowed to do so for free once a year and is a good idea anyway).
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Old 14th December 2009, 1:06 PM   #27
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LB - how about opening your own practice? You have a Master's right? In your state can you practice as an MFCC? Are there groups of MFCC's that lease space and that basically work together but really run their own practice?
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Old 14th December 2009, 1:10 PM   #28
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LB - how about opening your own practice? You have a Master's right? In your state can you practice as an MFCC? Are there groups of MFCC's that lease space and that basically work together but really run their own practice?
You have to have a liscense (LPC) and be credentialed through an insurance agency in order to do that. I can't actually even get a job at a private counseling firm without a liscensure because they can't bill for me.
I am an NCC (nationally certified counselor) but all that does is qualify me to get my LPC. You need so much supervision hours (equivilant to 2 years) and I have about 9 more months to go. You have to be in the field to get the supervision hours also.

I actually don't even want to open my own practice, it takes money and you have to have a ton of insurance. It's very risky also, you almost have to have a second job to support yourself until your practice takes off.
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Old 14th December 2009, 1:16 PM   #29
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You have to have a liscense (LPC) and be credentialed through an insurance agency in order to do that. I can't actually even get a job at a private counseling firm without a liscensure because they can't bill for me.
I am an NCC (nationally certified counselor) but all that does is qualify me to get my LPC. You need so much supervision hours (equivilant to 2 years) and I have about 9 more months to go. You have to be in the field to get the supervision hours also.

I actually don't even want to open my own practice, it takes money and you have to have a ton of insurance. It's very risky also, you almost have to have a second job to support yourself until your practice takes off.
Ok gotcha. How about going back to school for your PhD? So many people that are having a horrible time getting jobs are going back to school. In your case, it would cover the time frame, give you more experience and make you more marketable. You have experience as a cashier and you could work that while going back to school.

I know its not your plan but maybe something to think about?
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Old 14th December 2009, 1:24 PM   #30
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Ok gotcha. How about going back to school for your PhD? So many people that are having a horrible time getting jobs are going back to school. In your case, it would cover the time frame, give you more experience and make you more marketable. You have experience as a cashier and you could work that while going back to school.

I know its not your plan but maybe something to think about?
Yeah, I thought about that and checked into it. Most of the Phd programs in our area are about 4 years and are very expensive. I am lucky enough to not have any loans for both my bachelors and masters and I don't want to put myself in any debt. Fiance is in debt with school and car loans so adding to it would probably effect us very greatly.

I enjoy being a masters level counselor, I just need to get another job! I actually may have even more trouble, as they are hiring less for psychologist positions because nobody can afford to pay them. I don't want a private practice so really a phd wouldn't do much for me...
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