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Considering another job change...


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Old 19th November 2007, 1:26 AM   #16
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This is KEY!

All I want is to be able to kick ass in court, let my work speak for itself, and then go home to my family, friends, and dog. Is that bad?


No that's NOT bad. That's smart as hell. Too bad it took my lawyer husband until he was over 50 to achieve it. He did so at my urging and pushing. How? By moving to an area with less competition and lower real estate rates. He finally started his own practice. He keeps his own hours. He has never done better. A little networking, a good ad in the yellow pages and a LOT of luck and pro bono stuff has really paid off in so far as referralls go.

Think about it. You're WAY younger than he is but why not go for it now before you have a family and more responsibilities? Think about it. He told me he wished I had suggested this years before.
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Old 19th November 2007, 1:27 AM   #17
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SG I think if you sound very enthusiastic in your objective they will understand why you're dissatisfied at your current firm.

Some may even have felt like you feel now. And had wanted to do something more personally rewarding with their time.

Do what you love. Love what you do. You only live once.
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Old 19th November 2007, 4:34 AM   #18
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Whatever you choose, it doesn't have to be permanent. Think of your long-term goals and place your next two years in the big picture. Or think of your short-term goals and adhere to them. The government job is probably easier and more rewarding emotionally, but no job is perfect. On the other hand, hating your life because of your job is the worst thing in the world. I am very much experience-oriented. In other words, I like to do the thing that will bring me a long-term benefit, knowledge and mileage. Five years from now, you don't want to be the same lawyer; you want to be more valuable in the market.

I would think in terms of specialization, too. The experience of a DA is great for criminal law. Have you thought about other government jobs? The White House? How about replace Arnold?

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Originally Posted by Star Gazer View Post
separation between associates and partners,
What does this mean?
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Old 19th November 2007, 3:25 PM   #19
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What does this mean?
It means there's an "us" (associates) and a "them" (the partners/owners of the firm) mentality. It's not a team-like environment. Instead, it's more of a master-servant dynamic.
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Old 19th November 2007, 3:58 PM   #20
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What is the $401k thing?

SG I know EXACTLY how you feel. I can't imagine how I going to cope doing the same thing for another 30years until I retire. But I am too scared to change careers because the money is quite good.

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I'm financially secure. I'm just not financially where I want to be given how hard I'm working. I also know myself enough to know that if I were to take a job making $50K more (the first year, and then $60-75K more the next year, and on, and on), I would never be able to leave that type of money because I'd get used to having it and rely on it in one way or another.
Me too. Absolutely, and I AM working for the government. I am not that highly paid given my profession. And what grates is alot of highly paid private dentists ALSO have good work-life balances.
I feel sometimes that even though I am providing a service for those that need it most, many of them are thankless, rude, demanding and difficult.

Having said that- i don't commute, i walk to work, and I start at nine, and get out at five on the dot most days.
WB and I are working towards having a better lifestyle- that is why he is a teacher. He is smart enough to do something very high-pressure but he loves the lifestyle he has.

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I just really want what I spend the majority of my time doing to MEAN something.
It does... but I think I could understand where you are coming from with respect to your current situation, given that most of your clients are not people as such, but are companies etc.
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Old 19th November 2007, 4:10 PM   #21
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My good friend has been an ADA since she got out of law school and loves it. She adopted a little buy from russia and they have been very generous with leave time with her. Plus she has tons of job satisfaction.
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Old 19th November 2007, 11:02 PM   #22
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Just a random thought...

Having to do with the government part. Have you ever considered military law? JAG.
I actually looked into it my self but it was 17 years ago.
Being ex military, I can say that, hours and pay might not be the greatest, although they are both better as a officer than enlisted, but as far as actually cases go, it would be allot more diverse than civilian.

I know the military is not for everyone, and to be honest, I did enjoy my time in but probably wouldn't do it again.

I do wish you luck in the hunt, and hope you find something that you can enjoy....and get payed.
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Old 24th November 2007, 12:34 AM   #23
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S_G..no advice, but I got a ticket for a seatbelt not on..... can you get me out of it???
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Old 24th November 2007, 1:11 AM   #24
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It means there's an "us" (associates) and a "them" (the partners/owners of the firm) mentality. It's not a team-like environment. Instead, it's more of a master-servant dynamic.
Oh, gotta love that.

Tell me something, SG: if I don't get accepted into law school, are you going to tell me "Don't worry, better for you!" or "Oh, I am so sorry"?
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Old 28th November 2007, 7:44 PM   #25
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Tell me something, SG: if I don't get accepted into law school, are you going to tell me "Don't worry, better for you!" or "Oh, I am so sorry"?
I beg and plead my friends not to go to law school. I'd do the same for you.
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Old 2nd December 2007, 11:36 PM   #26
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SG, I think there is a clash of two things here. First, your ego. You want to do something great for your community to feel valued and to satisfy your ego. That's fine. However, you also mentioned how you wanted to be part of a small company where everyone is on the same team helping each other out. However, that would clash with your ego because you would then have to compromise with your team members. What I really think is that you rather prefer team environment over your ego because you rather have fun with your coworkers than feel egotistic. Maybe you could combine the two where you could be like a mini leader of your team, to kind of steer the group along the right path. That would give meaning to your job because others depend on you to make the right choices so you would feel needed. Maybe that's it. To just feel needed? What do you think about all this?
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Old 3rd December 2007, 6:04 PM   #27
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Star Gazer I think you should go for the job that fills your heart. Money will come if you're doing what you love.

May I ask you a question? Can you give me an estimate of how much a corporate labor lawyer makes a year?
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Old 3rd December 2007, 6:17 PM   #28
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May I ask you a question? Can you give me an estimate of how much a corporate labor lawyer makes a year?
I'm not sure I understand your question. "Corporate" lawyers can mean many things, but when attorneys refer to a "corporate attorney" we are generally referring to attorneys who deal with the formation of corporations, governing its bylaws/articles, shares, etc., and the protection of their assets as an entity. I've never heard of the term "corporate labor lawyer" or "corporate labor law." Corporations themselves often have in-house/general counsel that works for the company, not a private firm, and those attorneys may handle labor/employment issues, but they still aren't called a "corporate labor lawyer."

If what you meant to ask was what does an employment/labor attorney make at a big firm, that would range depending on the size of the firm, its reputation, and it's location. At a large firm, a first year could start anywhere from $65,000 to $165,000 per year depending on its reputation and location. The more prestigious firms in bigger cities will pay more. Smaller firms, or those firms in smaller cities will pay considerably less, very rarely hitting over 6 figures.

At my class level in my city, a big firm would pay anywhere from $115,000 to $180,000 per year for my area of law. A small firm would pay anywhere between $70,000 and $95,000. In-house would be anywhere between $80,000 and $150,000, and a county job would pay around $85,000. The higher the pay, the more hours you're expected to bill and the more business you're expected to generate.

There's a LOT of variance and far too many variables to make it an easy equation.
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Old 3rd December 2007, 10:58 PM   #29
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Thank you for your reply. I'm sorry about my ignorance pertaining to law. The person I'm talking about works for a large corporation in a large city and is general counsel in labor law. I think that's correct.
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Old 3rd December 2007, 10:59 PM   #30
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Oh and he's worked for the corporation for at least 20 years.
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