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Educating the kids at home


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Old 8th August 2017, 6:48 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by noelle303 View Post
I did what?

As far as a parent being educated, I don't necessarily mean that they need to have a teaching degree - to teach math, you should be familiar with it. To teach science, biology, literature, chemistry, physics etc, you should also be familiar with it. I'm saying that because these kids may grow up one day wanting to go to university, possibly study one of these subjects and they need a strong foundation.
Since I cant PM you on this vB setup for some reason I will explain.

Parroting is a mimic, a copy or a reproduction in manner.

Hope this helps. ok.
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Old 8th August 2017, 7:07 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by stixx View Post
Since I cant PM you on this vB setup for some reason I will explain.

Parroting is a mimic, a copy or a reproduction in manner.

Hope this helps. ok.
Ok, I don't really know why you'd think I copied you? We may have similar opinions, but rest assured, I didn't even fully read your post.
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Old 8th August 2017, 7:14 PM   #18
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Yes my kids are tested by the state.
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Old 8th August 2017, 7:16 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by AndyMate30 View Post
In social skills this is what they are learning.

*Real acceptance of other people.
*Education about other people.
*Manners
*Etiquette
*Love and affection
*Relationships
*Marriage and how it works.
*Non-Abstinence based sex education
*Anger management
*Self help
*Personal Safety

None of which is taught in schools...
You're right and wrong. A lot of this IS taught in schools. And the stuff which isn't taught in schools should be coming from a child's parents anyway. So home school or not, your children would still be receiving the same information. No advantage to home schooling in this list.
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Old 8th August 2017, 7:22 PM   #20
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I chose public schooling for many of the reasons you don't want it.

I strongly believe in not protecting children from the world. I want them to experience the world and learn to deal with different types of people. I want them to learn resilience. How do they improve their social skills if they don't get the opportunity to socialise with people from diverse backgrounds and different levels of motivation? How can they function at university or in their workplace if they haven't learned to block out the noise and power through their work?

I find it ironic that you think you can teach real acceptance of others when you also talk about public schools breeding punks and bullies. If this is how you view public school kids, it sounds like you have minimal acceptance of others. You're being a very poor role model.
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Old 8th August 2017, 8:53 PM   #21
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You're right and wrong. A lot of this IS taught in schools. And the stuff which isn't taught in schools should be coming from a child's parents anyway. So home school or not, your children would still be receiving the same information. No advantage to home schooling in this list.
No I don't tolerate or accept street punks and bullies
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Old 8th August 2017, 8:57 PM   #22
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No I don't tolerate or accept street punks and bullies
But leaning how to deal with them is a life skill.

And not all public school kids are "street punks and bullies"! The majority are good kids who become good people.
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Old 8th August 2017, 9:19 PM   #23
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No I don't tolerate or accept street punks and bullies
But you seem to equate punks and bullies with schools. Do you teach your kids that most kids in regular public or private schools aren't punks or bullies?

I agree with RC that learning how to deal with bullies is a life skill. What will your kids do when they meet the first bully in university or work and they've had no practice in dealing with them?

What is your experience with the restorative justice programs used in many schools to combat bullying? How effective do you find it?
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Old 8th August 2017, 10:27 PM   #24
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I pulled my daughter out of high school due to being bullied there and she finished up while being taught at home. While I agree that school may be an unsafe environment at times, realistically you can't protect your children forever.

Why you are instilling fear of others their own age is beyond me.
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Old 8th August 2017, 10:46 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by AndyMate30 View Post
No I don't tolerate or accept street punks and bullies

They may as well learn to deal with it, than hide from it....Real adult life has punks and bullies as well....at work, the store, everywhere...

You can direct them and lead them, show them the good and bad about life,. but sheltering won't do a damn bit of any good..Unless they never plan to leave the house..

TFY
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Old 9th August 2017, 12:37 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by basil67 View Post
I chose public schooling for many of the reasons you don't want it.

I strongly believe in not protecting children from the world. I want them to experience the world and learn to deal with different types of people. I want them to learn resilience. How do they improve their social skills if they don't get the opportunity to socialise with people from diverse backgrounds and different levels of motivation? How can they function at university or in their workplace if they haven't learned to block out the noise and power through their work?

I find it ironic that you think you can teach real acceptance of others when you also talk about public schools breeding punks and bullies. If this is how you view public school kids, it sounds like you have minimal acceptance of others. You're being a very poor role model.
home schooling provides advancements in education possibly, but as I stated.....you must have your children social and in different environments.

I have no children myself, but I dated a woman that I became instant dad overnight. I date her and not a sign of a toy because dad had custody. Then she got them that summer. When she told me she thought I would run. I didnt.

All public school and I did for them in a matter of months that they never understood. Just basics like picking up toys, excusing from the table, helping with cooking and learning, etc.

I love kids. Never had my own, but I put myself in an instant dad position wth a woman. I have to admit it was fun reading books, getting my nails painted with cheap polish I would buy them, christmas, etc. and all that chaos that goes with it.

That gal call could not gimme space and I had to lt her go, but I was more sorry for saying goodbye overall for the kids. I was starting to like all that messy crap I had to deal with. I think it was one of the best experiences I had i life to be honest. It was crazy chaos but it was a blast. It made me think about having my own later on....I would still like to if I can meet the right gal.

Heck,,,I might even home school them. Its not an isolation if you do it right, but I think it takes more time of a parent to engage child socialization. As I said and agree.....You isolate those kids and its only problems for them. Not healthy at all.
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Old 9th August 2017, 10:03 AM   #27
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I can't comment much on the American educational system but living in Canada I know there is a lot of work put in at the younger grades at least about acceptance, other people (other cultures ), self help, personal safety. And sex education is an important part of the grade 4-9 curriculum. Some of those things aren't taught to the same degree, although often come up still.

Personally I think there are pros and cons to home education. You can definitely teach your kids a lot more at home in less time. Educating classes of 30 kids who are all learning at different levels isn't particularly efficient.

But I'm not sure that home schooling is always the best way to teach your kids about social interaction, because that is exactly what you are keeping them away from. You say you want your kids to learn about conflict resolution and about other people, but if they were in a school with hundreds of other kids of various backgrounds, they would learn about other people, and have to develop their conflict management skills to at least some degree.

Make sure you provide your kids with lots of opportunities to interact with a wide variety of other kids, that is my basic message about home schooling.
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Old 9th August 2017, 10:51 AM   #28
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i assumed 'home schooled' was a child sitting at the kitchen table and a parent teaching them. that is not necessarily the case. i coach a HS girls ice hockey team. there is a family that 'home schools'. they can play HS sports even thou they do not attend as they live in the town. it was quickly apparent they are really alternative schooled. they go to X home for math, Y for biology, Z for a foreign language, etc. there are often 10 children in the same 'class'. these children were very well read and knowledgeable on various topics.

as for socialization --- the biggest/overblown reason ... adding to the above, this family was active in youth sports, the arts and had a large family in the area. they were as socially 'adjusted' as any other child AND those on their teams (including HS) could have cared less where they went to school --- except on snow days.
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