LoveShack.org Community Forums

Reload this Page LoveShack.org Community Forums > Familial > Parenting

Educating the kids at home


Parenting Discuss tips, concerns, and all the mayhem involved in raising kids.

Like Tree45Likes
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 8th August 2017, 11:24 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 28
Educating the kids at home

We are educating the kids at home.
This is the reason why.

1. Small class size
2. We are in charge of the curriculum and it's level of quality.
3. Interaction with other kids is appropriate instead of confrontational.


This is the curriculum.

Math, Science, English, French, Geography, U.S. History, World History, Civics, Psychology, Art, Home Economics, Wood Shop, Horticulture, Job Skills and Social Skills.


That sounds fairly ordinary....
Except the fact of the matter is, is that it isn't.
It by itself is far better than the current state issued curriculum at this point in time, and they are far better and higher functioning than their age peers in most schools outside of the home

And my kids have a much better relationship with us, their parents.


In social skills this is what they are learning.

*Real acceptance of other people.
*Education about other people.
*Manners
*Etiquette
*Love and affection
*Relationships
*Marriage and how it works.
*Non-Abstinence based sex education
*Anger management
*Self help
*Personal Safety

None of which is taught in schools...
What is being taught in school by proxy is how to be a street punk and a bully.

And in science, what we are teaching them is the following.

Geology, Paleontology, Zoology, Evolution, Ecology, Botany.
Physics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Anatomy and Computer Science.

In math we start at basic addition, all the way to Calculus.

There isn't a public school in Philly where I am from that is doing nearly what we are doing.
central and stixx like this.
AndyMate30 is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 11:29 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 28
Considering they are of a generation that is being made devoid of social skills, they socially function far more on a par with the baby boomers which is overall amongst the best that America ever had, socially and interactively.
AndyMate30 is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 11:35 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 28
And for gym they get gymnastics classes, they are part of neighborhood sports, they get swimming, they get boxing, karate, tae kwon do, and mma and jiu jitsu, they get strength training and bodybuilding.

Last edited by AndyMate30; 8th August 2017 at 11:38 AM..
AndyMate30 is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 1:08 PM   #4
Established Member
 
knabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,182
Good for you. Did you have a question?

I assume you are a certified teacher
__________________
“Here's what is truly at the heart of wholeheartedness: Worthy now, not if, not when, we're worthy of love and belonging now. Right this minute. As is.”
― Brené Brown, The Gifts of Imperfection
knabe is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 1:10 PM   #5
Established Member
 
knabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,182
Does your curriculum meet or exceed state and federal standards?

Will your children participate in standardized testing?

Will their schooling be overseen by any truly accredited agency so that they can be accepted into a college of their choice?

Will they be able to take AP exams when the time comes?

Will they be able to experiment, dissect, explore, etc?

Will they experience diversity on a regular basis?

Will they participate in any team sports?
knabe is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 2:55 PM   #6
Established Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 2,322
Kids need other kids to learn life skills.
mikeylo is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 3:02 PM   #7
Established Member
 
d0nnivain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Northeastern USA
Posts: 24,693
Lots of people educate at home. There are tons of resources for homeschoolers these days through the internet. If I ever had kids I hoped I'd be able to do this for them. (I can't have kids)


Do make sure your kids interact with other kids for socialization purposes: scouts, etc. It sounds like your do have your kids in many things & they are not isolated, which is good.



I am involved with a program that teaches high school kids about the law. The kids are given a set of facts. They have a teacher coach & an attorney coach who instruct them about the law, the operation of the court system & the trial process. Then the kids try the case against other schools. For the past several years there has always been a "home school" team & those kids are extraordinary. The parents enjoying making sure their kids have some more traditional experiences & this collaborative program offers that to them. So do check out the available peer group activities from like minded goal oriented caring parents like you.
d0nnivain is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 3:08 PM   #8
Established Member
 
knabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,182
Hey, I have no problem with homeschooling. I considered it (I am actually a teacher). My best friend did it.

But I believe there should be qualifications and standards in place. I know a woman in TN who had a GED who homeschooled. It was....less than stellar (this was the mid-90's). I also know mom's who use grocery shopping as math class and trips to the mall as economics class, and....well, you get my drift.

There need to be standards. And it is possible to homeschool without condescendingly bashing schools. IF you have emotional intelligence.
knabe is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 3:08 PM   #9
Member
 
stixx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: New York
Posts: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyMate30 View Post
We are educating the kids at home.
This is the reason why.

1. Small class size
2. We are in charge of the curriculum and it's level of quality.
3. Interaction with other kids is appropriate instead of confrontational.


This is the curriculum.

Math, Science, English, French, Geography, U.S. History, World History, Civics, Psychology, Art, Home Economics, Wood Shop, Horticulture, Job Skills and Social Skills.


That sounds fairly ordinary....
Except the fact of the matter is, is that it isn't.
It by itself is far better than the current state issued curriculum at this point in time, and they are far better and higher functioning than their age peers in most schools outside of the home

And my kids have a much better relationship with us, their parents.


In social skills this is what they are learning.

*Real acceptance of other people.
*Education about other people.
*Manners
*Etiquette
*Love and affection
*Relationships
*Marriage and how it works.
*Non-Abstinence based sex education
*Anger management
*Self help
*Personal Safety

None of which is taught in schools...
What is being taught in school by proxy is how to be a street punk and a bully.

And in science, what we are teaching them is the following.

Geology, Paleontology, Zoology, Evolution, Ecology, Botany.
Physics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Anatomy and Computer Science.

In math we start at basic addition, all the way to Calculus.

There isn't a public school in Philly where I am from that is doing nearly what we are doing.
Love the job your doing. As someone who in college pursued the education field early in college I believe in home schooling for years and studied Montesori Methods.

The US system is broken and I have to say from my personal opinion that it may hold a child back, and may have with the Tracking System Policy.

I could be wrong since I do not have children. I was a tracked when I was young and it held me back. I was just a bored student so I got poor grades, but if you Un-Track a classroom that may bring other students down to a lower level of education.

No idea. Read the book "Keeping Track" by Jeanie Oaks. Though I am sure you already have.

Great job and great parenting! Your doing a wonderful job! Just dont isolate your kids from the outside. Engage them in sports, church, and engage with other children in the area.

Your job is to guide you child, not isolate them from the world. You can let them grow with all you listed but without the interaction it can cause problems.

This is just an opinion and I am not a professional.
stixx is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 4:06 PM   #10
Established Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 513
I have no problem with homeschooling, as long as the parent is educated themself and informed and isn't doing it for indoctrination purposes.

The only thing that the parent needs to make sure is that the child is properly socialized through extra-curriculars and/or groups.

I actually send my daughter to a really progressive private school and I love the education she is getting there.
noelle303 is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 4:29 PM   #11
Member
 
stixx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: New York
Posts: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by noelle303 View Post
I have no problem with homeschooling, as long as the parent is educated themself and informed and isn't doing it for indoctrination purposes.

The only thing that the parent needs to make sure is that the child is properly socialized through extra-curriculars and/or groups.

I actually send my daughter to a really progressive private school and I love the education she is getting there.
Since you just parroted me on a post I have to ask this...

What does an educated parent mean? I really curious as to what this statement means.
stixx is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 4:44 PM   #12
Established Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 835
I know of a couple (my friend's friends) homeschooling their son. Assuming that your kid spends a few hours at her/his homeschool with the teacher (you) each day, how do you find the time to prepare for teaching? Do you get subsidized by your state financially for this? What qualifications/certificates are required to homeschool your kid? Thanks.
JuneL is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 5:20 PM   #13
Established Member
 
RecentChange's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 3,715
I don’t have kids – so I don’t really have a dog in this fight.

That said, I think “school” as a lot more to teach a kid than simple English math and science.

I kinda disagree that "social skills" are something that can be taught, and not learned through immersion.

Humans are social beings, and learning how to interact with our peers and authority figures is invaluable.

I know “bullying etc” is a major issue for SOME kids, but honestly, I think most kids should learn how to handle “meanies” how to make friends, how to build alliances, judge character etc, which is difficult to do if most interaction with their peers is controlled and “approved” by adults. I was a fat kid, from the country, going to a huge high school with an extremely diverse population (from silicon valley elite, to kids from crime riddled inner cities). I learned how to stand up for myself when I needed to, and how to make friends with people from different walks of life.

I also appreciated having a wide diversity of teachers. Not only did they have different perspective to teach, but I as a student learned how to meet the varied expectations that they had.

For me, in my professional life, its not the Chem class which has allowed me to excel in my career, but rather my people skills.

I learned how to read people, how to meet expectations, how to build alliances, when to get involved in something, and when to mind my own business. I credit those skills when I was the last “man” standing after the rest of my department was laid off. I credit those skills for my promotions and loyalty my company has shown me. I can relate to people from different walks of life, because I learned that in public school, and I can manage an unreasonable boss, because I had some unreasonable teachers in school as well. I also learned how to be heard, and rise above a crowd, because when you have a huge class – you have to.

I understand some kids “sink” in the sink or swim culture of public schools, but certainly not all are “sinkers” and I think its important to recognize the other life skills the social aspect of public school teach.
RecentChange is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 5:34 PM   #14
Established Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 513
Quote:
Originally Posted by stixx View Post
Since you just parroted me on a post I have to ask this...

What does an educated parent mean? I really curious as to what this statement means.
I did what?

As far as a parent being educated, I don't necessarily mean that they need to have a teaching degree - to teach math, you should be familiar with it. To teach science, biology, literature, chemistry, physics etc, you should also be familiar with it. I'm saying that because these kids may grow up one day wanting to go to university, possibly study one of these subjects and they need a strong foundation.
noelle303 is offline  
Old 8th August 2017, 5:38 PM   #15
Established Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 835
Well said!!!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by RecentChange View Post
I don’t have kids – so I don’t really have a dog in this fight.

That said, I think “school” as a lot more to teach a kid than simple English math and science.

I kinda disagree that "social skills" are something that can be taught, and not learned through immersion.

Humans are social beings, and learning how to interact with our peers and authority figures is invaluable.

I know “bullying etc” is a major issue for SOME kids, but honestly, I think most kids should learn how to handle “meanies” how to make friends, how to build alliances, judge character etc, which is difficult to do if most interaction with their peers is controlled and “approved” by adults. I was a fat kid, from the country, going to a huge high school with an extremely diverse population (from silicon valley elite, to kids from crime riddled inner cities). I learned how to stand up for myself when I needed to, and how to make friends with people from different walks of life.

I also appreciated having a wide diversity of teachers. Not only did they have different perspective to teach, but I as a student learned how to meet the varied expectations that they had.

For me, in my professional life, its not the Chem class which has allowed me to excel in my career, but rather my people skills.

I learned how to read people, how to meet expectations, how to build alliances, when to get involved in something, and when to mind my own business. I credit those skills when I was the last “man” standing after the rest of my department was laid off. I credit those skills for my promotions and loyalty my company has shown me. I can relate to people from different walks of life, because I learned that in public school, and I can manage an unreasonable boss, because I had some unreasonable teachers in school as well. I also learned how to be heard, and rise above a crowd, because when you have a huge class – you have to.

I understand some kids “sink” in the sink or swim culture of public schools, but certainly not all are “sinkers” and I think its important to recognize the other life skills the social aspect of public school teach.
Not only that, and those adults are actually your parents.
JuneL is offline  
 

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

 

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Terrified of losing kids and home!!!!! Hannah100 Infidelity 46 8th March 2016 12:50 PM
Sleeping over your ex's home because of the kids? triciabuzo Dating 4 17th January 2013 1:18 PM
Hookup with Kids in Home mlpony Dating 23 22nd October 2012 1:45 PM
BF moved today- kids come home Sun- Help a hurting mom lifestyle1 Breaks and Breaking Up 12 7th November 2004 7:58 PM

 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 3:54 PM.

Please note: The suggestions and advice offered on this web site are opinions only and are not to be used in the place of professional psychological counseling or medical advice. If you or someone close to you is currently in crisis or in an emergency situation, contact your local law enforcement agency or emergency number.


Copyright © 1997-2013 LoveShack.org. All Rights Reserved.